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The demand for health: differences between the native Dutch and immigrants in the Netherlands AgEcon
Cornelisse-Vermaat, Judith R.; Maassen van den Brink, Henriette.
This paper estimates the demand for health by using a health capital model for different population groups (native Dutch, Surinamese/Antillean, Moroccan, and Turkish) in the Netherlands. Also the effect of overweight on health utility is investigated. We found a decrease in the demand for health for age, overweight, and smoking, we found an increase in the demand for health for level of education and marital status. The analyses show a strong effect of gender. Being female in all groups is negatively related to health utility. Turkish and Moroccan ethnicity is negatively related to health status.
Tipo: Working or Discussion Paper Palavras-chave: Demand for health; Health production; Ethnicity; Overweight; Food habits; Health Economics and Policy; C24; C25; I10; I12.
Ano: 2003 URL: http://purl.umn.edu/46731
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The effects of food habits and socioeconomic status on overweight. Differences between the native Dutch and immigrants in the Netherlands AgEcon
Cornelisse-Vermaat, Judith R.; Maassen van den Brink, Henriette.
Overweight is a worldwide growing epidemic. The Netherlands is among the countries with the highest prevalence for overweight, together with the USA, UK, and Germany. This paper investigates differences in overweight between native Dutch and three immigrant groups in the Netherlands, and the effects of food habits and socioeconomic status on overweight. The results show that all immigrant groups have a higher prevalence for overweight than the Dutch, apart from Moroccans. Males are overweight more frequently than females. Takeaway food, eating out, and fresh vegetables decrease BMI, while convenience food, ready-to-eat meals, and delivery food (in some cases) increase BMI. In all groups, BMI increases with age. For Surinamese/Antilleans and Turks BMI...
Tipo: Working or Discussion Paper Palavras-chave: Overweight; Ethnicity; Food habits; Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety; C20; D12; I12.
Ano: 2003 URL: http://purl.umn.edu/46732
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The main problems of food allergic consumers concerning food labeling: an ethnographic study AgEcon
Voordouw, Jantine; Cornelisse-Vermaat, Judith R.; Frewer, Lynn J..
It has been estimated that 5–8% of children and 1–2% of the adults in developed countries are affected by food allergy, with symptoms ranging from discomfort to fatality. At present, avoidance of problematic foods is the only effective treatment strategy. As of November 25 th , 2005 food manufacturers in the EU are obliged to list 12 potentially allergic ingredients in food. Although the label is still not always fully understood by the consumer, or they get confused by precautionary labelling practices. This paper aims to gain insights into the information preferences of food allergic consumers regarding existing food labelling and additional information delivery systems. The results of this study will facilitate the development of best practices in...
Tipo: Conference Paper or Presentation Palavras-chave: Food allergy; Consumers; Food labelling; Information needs; Consumer/Household Economics; Food Consumption/Nutrition/Food Safety.
Ano: 2006 URL: http://purl.umn.edu/10041
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