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Registros recuperados: 8
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Historical framework to explain long-term coupled human and natural system feedbacks: application to a multiple-ownership forest landscape in the northern Great Lakes region, USA Ecology and Society
Steen-Adams, Michelle M.; Department of Environmental Studies, University of New England; Pacific Northwest Research Station, USDA Forest Service; msteenadams@une.edu; Langston, Nancy; Department of Social Sciences, Michigan Technological University; nelangst@gmail.com; Adams, Mark D. O.; Department of Environmental Studies, University of New England; madams3@une.edu; Mladenoff, David J.; Department of Forest and Wildlife Ecology, University of Wisconsin-Madison; djmladen@wisc.edu.
Current and future human and forest landscape conditions are influenced by the cumulative, unfolding history of social-ecological interactions. Examining past system responses, especially unintended consequences, can reveal valuable insights that promote learning and adaptation in forest policy and management. Temporal couplings are complex, however; they can be difficult to trace, characterize, and explain. We develop a framework that integrates environmental history into analysis of coupled human and natural systems (CHANS). Our study demonstrates how historical data and methods can help to explain temporal complexity of long-term CHANS feedbacks. We focus on two sources of temporal complexity: legacy effects and lagged interactions. We apply our...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: CHANS; Environmental history; Feedback; Forest landscape; Great Lakes; Historical ecology; Lagged interaction; Legacy; Ownership; Tribal; Unanticipated consequence.
Ano: 2015
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Impact of ocean-atmosphere current feedback on the ocean mesoscale activity: regional variations, and sensitivity to model resolution ArchiMer
Jullien, Swen; Masson, Sébastien; Oerder, Véra; Samson, Guillaume; Colas, François; Renault, Lionel.
Ocean mesoscale eddies are characterized by rotating-like and meandering currents that imprint the low-level atmosphere. Such a current feedback (CFB) has been shown to induce a sink of energy from the ocean to the atmosphere, and consequently to damp the eddy kinetic energy (EKE), with an apparent regional disparity. In a context of increasing model resolution, the importance of this feedback, and its dependence on oceanic and atmospheric models resolution arise. Using a hierarchy of quasi-global coupled models with spatial resolutions varying from ¼° to 1/12°, the present study shows that the CFB induces a negative wind work at scales ranging from 100 to 1000 km, and a subsequent damping of the mesoscale activity by ∼30% on average, independently of the...
Tipo: Text Palavras-chave: Currents; Feedback; Mesoscale processes; Air-sea interaction; Coupled models; Mesoscale models.
Ano: 2020 URL: https://archimer.ifremer.fr/doc/00601/71329/69759.pdf
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Modeling Social-Ecological Feedback Effects in the Implementation of Payments for Environmental Services in Pasture-Woodlands Ecology and Society
Huber, Robert; Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research WSL; robert.huber@wsl.ch; Briner, Simon; ETH Zurich, Agri-food and Agri-environmental Economics Group, Department of Environmental Systems Science; briners@ethz.ch; Lauber, Stefan; Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research WSL; stefan.lauber@wsl.ch; Seidl, Roman; ETH Zurich, Natural and Social Science Interface, Department of Environmental Systems Science; roman.seidl@env.ethz.ch; Widmer, Alexander; ETH Zurich, Environmental Policy and Economics, Department of Environmental Systems Science; widmeale@env.ethz.ch; Le, Quang Bao; ETH Zurich, Natural and Social Science Interface, Department of Environmental Systems Science; quang.le@env.ethz.ch; Hirschi, Christian; ETH Zurich, Environmental Policy and Economics, Department of Environmental Systems Science; christian.hirschi@env.ethz.ch.
An effective implementation of payment for environmental services (PES) must allow for complex interactions of coupled social-ecological systems. We present an integrative study of the pasture-woodland landscape of the Swiss Jura Mountains combining methods from natural and social sciences to explore feedback between vegetation dynamics on paddock level, farm-based decision making, and policy decisions on the national political level. Our modeling results show that concomitant climatic and socioeconomic changes advance the loss of open grassland in silvopastoral landscapes. This would, in the longer term, deteriorate the historical wooded pastures in the region, which fulfill important functions for biodiversity and are widely considered as landscapes that...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Agent-based modeling; Dynamic modeling; Feedback; Human-environment systems; Integrated study; Payments for environmental services; Policy network analysis.
Ano: 2013
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Smart Meter Devices and The Effect of Feedback on Residential Electricity Consumption: Evidence from a Natural Experiment in Northern Ireland AgEcon
Gans, Will; Alberini, Anna; Longo, Alberto.
Using a unique set of data and exploiting a large-scale natural experiment, we estimate the effect of real-time usage information on residential electricity consumption in Northern Ireland. Starting in April 2002, the utility replaced prepayment meters with “smart” meters that allow the consumer to track usage in real-time. We rely on this event, account for the endogeneity of price and plan with consumption through a plan selection correction term, and find that the provision of information is associated with a decline in electricity consumption of up to 20%. We find that the reduction is robust to different specifications, selection-bias correction methods and subsamples of the original data. At £15-17 per tonne of CO2e (2009£), the smart meter program...
Tipo: Working or Discussion Paper Palavras-chave: Residential Energy; Electricity Demand; Feedback; Smart Meter; Information; Resource /Energy Economics and Policy; Q40; Q41; D8.
Ano: 2011 URL: http://purl.umn.edu/108202
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Sustainable Development of the Boreal Forest: Interaction of Ecological, Social, and Business Feedbacks Ecology and Society
Chapin, F. Stuart; University of Alaska; fffsc@aurora.uaf.edu; Whiteman, Gail; Queen's University; whiteman@nsi-ins.ca.
Humans are an integral component of ecosystems, just as the products of ecosystems are critical to social systems. To understand the future state of the boreal forest, we must understand the ecological, social, economic, and business interactions that link ecological and social systems into a common regional system, as well as the feedbacks that govern changes in these interactions. We analyze the negative feedbacks that promoted a sustainable interaction between ecological and social systems prior to the development of business systems, which are dominated by positive feedbacks that have reduced the sustainability of the boreal system. We suggest a minimum set of interactions that are required to improve the sustainability of a business-based boreal system.
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Boreal forest; Business; Consumerism; Ecosystem; Feedback; Social system; Sustainability..
Ano: 1998
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Synthesis of human-nature feedbacks Ecology and Society
Hull, Vanessa; Center for Systems Integration and Sustainability (CSIS), Michigan State University; hullvane@msu.edu; Tuanmu, Mao-Ning; Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Yale University; Center for Systems Integration and Sustainability (CSIS), Michigan State University; mao-ning.tuanmu@yale.edu; Liu, Jianguo; Center for Systems Integration and Sustainability (CSIS), Michigan State University; liuji@msu.edu.
In today’s globalized world, humans and nature are inextricably linked. The coupled human and natural systems (CHANS) framework provides a lens with which to understand such complex interactions. One of the central components of the CHANS framework involves examining feedbacks among human and natural systems, which form when effects from one system on another system feed back to affect the first system. Despite developments in understanding feedbacks in single disciplines, interdisciplinary research on CHANS feedbacks to date is scant and often site-specific, a shortcoming that prevents complex coupled systems from being fully understood. The special feature “Exploring Feedbacks in Coupled Human and Natural Systems (CHANS)”...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: CHANS; Feedback; Policy; Sustainability; Telecoupling; Time lag.
Ano: 2015
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The Economic Significance of Bioeconomic Feedback Loops: The Case of a Recreational Fishery AgEcon
Deisenroth, Daniel B.; Craig, Bond.
Tipo: Conference Paper or Presentation Palavras-chave: Bioeconomic; Feedback; Optimal Control; Fishery; Dynamic; Environmental Economics and Policy; Q57.
Ano: 2010 URL: http://purl.umn.edu/61414
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The effect of reciprocal connections between demographic decision making and land use on decadal dynamics of population and land-use change Ecology and Society
Zvoleff, Alexander; San Diego State University, Department of Geography; azvoleff@conservation.org; An, Li; San Diego State University, Department of Geography; lan@mail.sdsu.edu.
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Coupled human-natural system; Environment; Feedback; Fertility; Land use; Marriage; Population.
Ano: 2014
Registros recuperados: 8
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