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Registros recuperados: 4
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Effects of Roads and Traffic on Wildlife Populations and Landscape Function: Road Ecology is Moving toward Larger Scales Ecology and Society
van der Ree, Rodney; University of Melbourne; rvdr@unimelb.edu.au; van der Grift, Edgar A.; Alterra, Wageningen UR, Netherlands; edgar.vandergrift@wur.nl; Clevenger, Anthony P.; Western Transportation Institute, Montana State University, USA; apclevenger@gmail.com.
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Animal movement; Animal-vehicle collisions; Barrier effect; Ecological threshold; Gene flow; Habitat fragmentation; Mitigation; Population viability analysis; Road ecology; Road-effect zone; Traffic mortality; Traffic noise; Traffic volume; Transportation planning.
Ano: 2011
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Frogs Call at a Higher Pitch in Traffic Noise Ecology and Society
Parris, Kirsten M; University of Melbourne; Australian Research Centre for Urban Ecology, Royal Botanic Gardens Melbourne; k.parris@unimelb.edu.au; Velik-Lord, Meah; University of Melbourne; meah@unimelb.edu.au; North, Joanne M. A.; University of Melbourne; fflojjo@yahoo.com.
Male frogs call to attract females for mating and to defend territories from rival males. Female frogs of some species prefer lower-pitched calls, which indicate larger, more experienced males. Acoustic interference occurs when background noise reduces the active distance or the distance over which an acoustic signal can be detected. Birds are known to call at a higher pitch or frequency in urban noise, decreasing acoustic interference from low-frequency noise. Using Bayesian linear regression, we investigated the effect of traffic noise on the pitch of advertisement calls in two species of frogs, the southern brown tree frog (Litoria ewingii) and the common eastern froglet (Crinia signifera). We found evidence that L. ewingii calls at a higher pitch in...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Acoustic interference; Ambient noise; Amphibian decline; Animal behavior; Bioacoustics; Road ecology; Signal design; Traffic noise; Urban ecology; Vocal communication; Litoria ewingii; Crinia signifera.
Ano: 2009
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Impacts of Traffic Noise and Traffic Volume on Birds of Roadside Habitats Ecology and Society
Parris, Kirsten M.; School of Botany, University of Melbourne, Australia; Australian Research Centre for Urban Ecology, Royal Botanic Gardens Melbourne, Australia; k.parris@unimelb.edu.au; Schneider, Angela; Department of Zoology, University of Melbourne, Australia; angelas@unimelb.edu.au.
Roadside habitats are important for a range of taxa including plants, insects, mammals, and birds, particularly in developed countries in which large expanses of native vegetation have been cleared for agriculture or urban development. Although roadside vegetation may provide suitable habitat for many species, resident animals can be exposed to high levels of traffic noise, visual disturbance from passing vehicles, and the risk of collision with cars and trucks. Traffic noise can reduce the distance over which acoustic signals such as song can be detected, an effect known as acoustic interference or masking. Studies from the northern hemisphere show that the singing behavior of birds changes in the presence of traffic noise. We investigated the impact of...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Acoustic interference; Ambient noise; Bioacoustics; Conservation biology; Road ecology; Signal design; Traffic noise; Vocal communication..
Ano: 2009
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Road Impacts on Abundance, Call Traits, and Body Size of Rainforest Frogs in Northeast Australia Ecology and Society
Hoskin, Conrad J.; Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, Australia; Conrad.Hoskin@anu.edu.au; Goosem, Miriam W.; James Cook University, Cairns, Queensland, Australia; miriam.goosem1@jcu.edu.au.
Frogs are potentially sensitive indicators of road impacts, with studies indicating particular susceptibility to road mortality. Calling, i.e., breeding, behavior could also be affected by traffic noise. We investigated effects on frog abundance and calling behavior where a busy highway crosses rainforest stream breeding habitat in northeast Australia. Frog abundance was repeatedly surveyed along five stream transects during a summer breeding season. Abundance of two species, Litoria rheocola and Austrochaperina pluvialis, increased significantly with perpendicular distance from the road along two transects. No trends in abundance were detected for A. pluvialis on two other transects where it was common, or for Litoria serrata on one transect where...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Call frequency; Call masking; Litoria rheocola; Road kill; Stream; Traffic noise.
Ano: 2010
Registros recuperados: 4
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