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Registros recuperados: 7
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Does Government’s Biofuel Incentive Payment Program Work in the Presence of Asymmetric Information? AgEcon
Maung, Thein A.; Yuan, Yan.
Since combustion of fossil fuels can release a large amount of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere thereby accelerate the rate of climate change, biofuel from biomass has been suggested as a fuel of the future. We argue that if biofuel is to become a fuel of the future, the principal (government or social planner) should make monetary incentive payments to farmers willing to dedicate their farm land to growing bioenergy crops. The problem arises when the principal does not have information on whether these biofuel farmers are actually low-cost types or high-cost types. The idea of a biofuel incentive payment program is to distribute more incentive payments to high-cost farmers so as to induce them to participate in the program. Principal-agent model is...
Tipo: Conference Paper or Presentation Palavras-chave: Resource /Energy Economics and Policy.
Ano: 2010 URL: http://purl.umn.edu/61816
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Economics of Biomass Fuels for Electricity Production: A Case Study with Crop Residues AgEcon
Maung, Thein A.; McCarl, Bruce A..
In the past, studies on agricultural feedstocks for energy production were motivated by rising fossil fuel prices interpreted by many as caused by resource depletion. However, today's studies are mainly motivated by concerns for climate change and global warming. Currently, most studies concentrate on liquid fuels with little study devoted toward electricity. This study examines crop residues for electricity production in the context of climate change and global warming. We use sector modeling to simulate future market penetration for biopower production from crop residues. Our findings suggest that crop residues cost much more than coal because they have lower heat content and higher production/hauling costs. For crop residues to have any role in...
Tipo: Conference Paper or Presentation Palavras-chave: Resource /Energy Economics and Policy.
Ano: 2008 URL: http://purl.umn.edu/6417
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Economics of Sourcing Cellulosic Feedstock for Energy Production AgEcon
Gustafson, Cole R.; Maung, Thein A.; Saxowsky, David M.; Nowatzki, John; Miljkovic, Tatjana.
This study investigates the economics of supplying wheat straw and corn stover within 100 mile radius of a potential new biorefinery in southeast North Dakota. In particular, straw and stover total delivery costs, potential straw and stover supply sites and least cost transportation routes are identified using a linear programming transport model and a GIS (Geographic Information Systems) mapping system. We show that USDA/NRCS (Natural Resources Conservation Service) future crop residue removal rate policies will be important for determining whether it is economically viable to harvest crop residues as potential feedstock for energy generation. Increase in residue removal rates narrow the size of residue supply areas and consequently result in lowering...
Tipo: Conference Paper or Presentation Palavras-chave: Wheat Straw; Corn Stover; Density; Transportation Cost; GIS; Community/Rural/Urban Development; Crop Production/Industries.
Ano: 2011 URL: http://purl.umn.edu/103260
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Market Penetration of Biomass Fuels for Electricity Generation AgEcon
Maung, Thein A..
The electric power sector is a main source of carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions that contribute to global warming. In the U.S., fossil fuel fired power plants are responsible for about 38% of the total CO2 emissions from all sources. Switching a significant portion of the U.S. electricity generating capacity from fossil fuels to biomass fuels would help reduce CO2 emissions from the electric power industries. At present, biomass accounts for only about 1% of the fuel used for electricity generation in the U.S. In contrast, coal alone accounts for about 50%, and nuclear, natural gas and petroleum explain for about 20%, 16% and 3% respectively of the fuels used for electricity generation. There are a number of factors that may influence the extent to which...
Tipo: Conference Paper or Presentation Palavras-chave: Resource /Energy Economics and Policy.
Ano: 2006 URL: http://purl.umn.edu/21377
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The Economic Feasibility of Energy Sugar Beet Biofuel Production in Central North Dakota AgEcon
Maung, Thein A.; Gustafson, Cole R..
This study examines the financial feasibility of producing ethanol biofuel from sugar beets in central North Dakota. Under the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007, biofuel from sugar beets uniquely qualifies as an “advanced biofuel”. EISA mandates production of 15 billion gallons of advanced biofuels annually by 2022. A stochastic simulation financial model was calibrated with irrigated sugar beet data from central North Dakota to determine economic feasibility and risks of production for a 10MGY (million gallon per year) and 20MGY ethanol plant. Study results indicate that feedstock costs, which include sugar beets and beet molasses, account for more than 70% of total production expenses. The estimated breakeven ethanol price for the...
Tipo: Conference Paper or Presentation Palavras-chave: Ethanol; Sugar beets; Molasses; Net Present Value; Risk; Agricultural Finance; Resource /Energy Economics and Policy.
Ano: 2010 URL: http://purl.umn.edu/61235
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The Economic Feasibility of Sugarbeet Biofuel Production in Central North Dakota AgEcon
Maung, Thein A.; Gustafson, Cole R..
This study examines the financial feasibility of producing ethanol biofuel from sugar beets in central North Dakota. Under the Energy Independence and Security Act (EISA) of 2007, biofuel from sugar beets uniquely qualifies as an “advanced biofuel”. EISA mandates production of 15 billion gallons of advanced biofuels annually by 2022. A stochastic simulation financial model was calibrated with irrigated sugar beet data from central North Dakota to determine economic feasibility and risks of production for a 10MGY (million gallon per year) and 20MGY ethanol plant. Study results indicate that feedstock costs, which include sugar beets and beet molasses, account for more than 70% of total production expenses. The estimated breakeven ethanol price for the 20MGY...
Tipo: Report Palavras-chave: Agribusiness; Crop Production/Industries; Production Economics.
Ano: 2010 URL: http://purl.umn.edu/95745
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The Viability of Harvesting Corn Cobs and Stover for Biofuel Production in North Dakota AgEcon
Maung, Thein A.; Gustafson, Cole R..
This study examines the impact of stochastic harvest field time, corn cob and stover harvest technologies, increases in farm size, and alternative tillage practices on profit maximizing potential of corn cob and stover collection in North Dakota. Using three mathematical programming models, we analyze farmers’ harvest activities under 1) corn grain only harvest option, 2) simultaneous corn grain and cob harvest(one-pass) option 3) separate corn grain and stover harvest (two-pass) option. Under the first corn grain only option, farmers are able to complete harvesting corn grain and achieve maximum net income in a fairly short amount of time with existing combine technology. However, under the simultaneous corn grain and cob one-pass harvest option, our...
Tipo: Conference Paper or Presentation Palavras-chave: Cob; Stover; Harvest field time; Optimization; Farm size; Tillage; Crop Production/Industries; Production Economics.
Ano: 2011 URL: http://purl.umn.edu/103613
Registros recuperados: 7
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