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2006 Global Cotton Outlook AgEcon
Mohanty, Samarendu; Pan, Suwen; Welch, Mark; Fadiga, Mohamadou L.; Ethridge, Don E..
Tipo: Report Palavras-chave: Agricultural and Food Policy.
Ano: 2006 URL: http://purl.umn.edu/53154
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2007 Global Cotton Outlook AgEcon
Ethridge, Don E.; Mohanty, Samarendu; Pan, Suwen; Fadiga, Mohamadou L.; Welch, Mark; Yates, Samantha.
Economic Fundamentals - Real GDP growth is projected to be stable at about 2.5% per year in developed countries and be around 5% in developing nations. A more favorable exchange rate between China’s currency and the U.S. dollar may make U.S. cotton more affordable to China’s growing cotton textile industry.
Tipo: Report Palavras-chave: Agricultural and Food Policy.
Ano: 2007 URL: http://purl.umn.edu/53155
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Assessing the Impacts of the Chinese TRQ System and U.S. Subsidies on the World Cotton Market AgEcon
Pan, Suwen; Welch, Mark; Mohanty, Samarendu; Fadiga, Mohamadou L.; Ethridge, Don E..
This article compares how eliminating the U.S. cotton subsidy program and the Chinese cotton tariff-rate quota (TRQ) would affect the world cotton market. The results show China's TRQ has a greater negative impact on the world cotton market than do U.S. subsidies. Compared to a base-level estimate, the elimination of China's TRQ increases the world cotton price and increases the quantity of world cotton traded, whereas the elimination of U.S. cotton subsidies increases the cotton price (but less than under TRQ elimination) and decreases the world cotton trade. The combined effect of eliminating both programs is also shown.
Tipo: Journal Article Palavras-chave: International Relations/Trade.
Ano: 2005 URL: http://purl.umn.edu/23895
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Assessing the Impacts of the Chinese TRQ System and U.S. Subsidies on the World Cotton Market: Technical Annex AgEcon
Pan, Suwen; Welch, Mark; Mohanty, Samarendu; Fadiga, Mohamadou L.; Ethridge, Don E..
This document is the technical annex to the full paper "Assessing the Impacts of the Chinese TRQ System and U.S. Subsidies on the World Cotton Market" which is available separately.
Tipo: Journal Article Palavras-chave: International Relations/Trade.
Ano: 2005 URL: http://purl.umn.edu/23884
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Chinese Tariff Rate Quota v.s. U.S. Subsidies: What Affects the World Cotton Market More? AgEcon
Pan, Suwen; Welch, Mark; Mohanty, Samarendu; Fadiga, Mohamadou L.; Ethridge, Don E..
Paper replaced with new version 8/17/05
Tipo: Conference Paper or Presentation Palavras-chave: Cotton; International trade; Subsidies; TRQ; International Relations/Trade; Q11; Q17.
Ano: 2005 URL: http://purl.umn.edu/19111
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Cotton in a Free Trade World AgEcon
Pan, Suwen; Fadiga, Mohamadou L.; Mohanty, Samarendu; Welch, Mark; Ethridge, Don E..
The United States has issued a proposal to the world trading community outlining several steps to jumpstart the stalled World Trade Organization (WTO) negotiations on agriculture. The proposal is intended as a challenge to members of the WTO to improve market access through “ambitious tariff reduction” and to “move aggressively” to cut trade-distorting domestic support (Portman, 2005). Although the major parameters of the proposal are yet to be defined, these steps seem consistent with commitments made by WTO participating countries to move agricultural trade negotiations forward in the framework agreement of July 2004.
Tipo: Report Palavras-chave: Agricultural and Food Policy.
Ano: 2005 URL: http://purl.umn.edu/53147
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Cotton Trade Liberalizations and Domestic Agricultural Policy Reforms: A Partial Equilibrium Analysis AgEcon
Pan, Suwen; Fadiga, Mohamadou L.; Mohanty, Samarendu; Welch, Mark.
This paper analyzed the effects of trade liberalizing reforms in the world cotton market using a partial equilibrium model. The simulation results indicated that a removal of domestic subsidies and border tariffs for cotton would increase the amount of world cotton trade by an average of 4% in the next five years and world cotton prices by an average of 12% over the same time horizon. The findings indicated that under the liberalization policy, the United States would lose part of its export share to Brazil, Australia, and Africa. Furthermore, net cotton importing countries with minimum domestic and trade distortions would import less because of higher cotton prices whereas net cotton importing countries that subsidize domestic production and/or impose...
Tipo: Conference Paper or Presentation Palavras-chave: Agricultural and Food Policy.
Ano: 2006 URL: http://purl.umn.edu/35469
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Guide to Foreign Crop Subsidies and Tariffs AgEcon
Ethridge, Don E.; Mohanty, Samarendu; Pan, Suwen; Welch, Mark; Fadiga, Mohamadou L.; Velandia-Parra, Margarita M.; Yates, Samantha.
This study attempts to summarize information on farm policies being used for seven major crops–corn, cotton, rice, sorghum, soybeans, sugar, and wheat–by a group of 21 countries representing both developing and developed nations. Overall, the study concludes that agriculture has a special status in both developed and developing countries with a wide variety of subsidy and protection instruments in place.
Tipo: Report Palavras-chave: Agricultural and Food Policy; International Relations/Trade.
Ano: 2009 URL: http://purl.umn.edu/53138
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India Edible Oil Consumption: A Censored Incomplete Demand Approach AgEcon
Pan, Suwen; Mohanty, Samarendu; Welch, Mark.
A Censored Incomplete Demand System is applied to household expenditures for edible oil in India. The results show that edible peanut oil is still a luxury good in India, whereas expenditure elasticities for other edible oils are relatively low. The food habit, location, education of household heads, and other demographic variables have significant effects on the choice of edible oils.
Tipo: Journal Article Palavras-chave: Censored Incomplete Demand System; India edible oil; Unit value; Agribusiness; Demand and Price Analysis; Production Economics; C21; D1; Q11.
Ano: 2008 URL: http://purl.umn.edu/47261
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Sino-U.S. and Sino-E.U. Textile Safeguard Agreements: Comparing the Effects to Free Market Conditions AgEcon
Pan, Suwen; Welch, Mark; Mohanty, Samarendu; Fadiga, Mohamadou L..
The effects of Sino-US and Sino-EU safeguard agreements on US, China and world cotton and textile sectors are investigated using a partial equilibrium model. The effects are compared to a free trade scenario under the provisions of the Agreement on Textiles and Clothing (ATC). The two agreements capping Chinese textile exports would decrease China's textile and apparel exports, production and domestic consumption by an average 1.57 percent, 0.63 percent and, 0.32 percent respectively. The safeguard agreements cause an increase in the U.S. cotton textile price index and a slight decrease in U.S. net textile imports and textile consumption. The agreements cause a decrease in the world cotton price and the quantity of cotton traded, but these trends...
Tipo: Conference Paper or Presentation Palavras-chave: International Relations/Trade.
Ano: 2006 URL: http://purl.umn.edu/21117
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The 2007 USDA Farm Bill Proposal: Implications for the U.S. Cotton Industry AgEcon
Pan, Suwen; Welch, Mark; Fadiga, Mohamadou L.; Mohanty, Samarendu.
The proposed 2007 farm bill contains fundamental shifts in policy option mainly dictated by a desire to render the U.S. agriculture “more market oriented’ and the programs less costly to the U.S. treasury. The proposal adopts a revenue-based counter cyclical payment while maintaining the current price-based counter cyclical payment scheme. Under the revenue-based system, payment would be triggered when the actual national revenue per acre falls below the national target revenue per acre. The choice is left to producers who will be allowed a one time option to select one of these two schemes.
Tipo: Report Palavras-chave: Agricultural and Food Policy.
Ano: 2007 URL: http://purl.umn.edu/53146
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The Impact of India's Cotton Yield on U.S. and World Cotton Markets AgEcon
Pan, Suwen; Welch, Mark; Mohanty, Samarendu; Fadiga, Mohamadou L..
Cotton is India’s main cash crop. It contributes to the livelihood of 60 million people and accounts for 30 percent of the country’s agricultural domestic product (Barwale et al., 2004). Total cotton acreage in India is estimated at 9 million hectares, the largest in the world (Gandhi, 2006). About 65 percent of cotton production activities are rainfed and subject to the vagaries of weather. Cotton is grown in nine states, spread over three agroclimatic zones with different planting schedules. Planting usually ends by the first week of June in northern regions (Punjab, Haryana, and Rajasthan), by mid-August in the central region (Gujarat, Maharashtra, and Madhya Pradesh), and by the first week of September in parts of the south (Andhra Pradesh, Karnataka,...
Tipo: Report Palavras-chave: Agricultural and Food Policy.
Ano: 2006 URL: http://purl.umn.edu/53149
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The Impacts of Eliminating Step 2 Program on the U.S. and World Cotton Market AgEcon
Mohanty, Samarendu; Pan, Suwen; Welch, Mark; Ethridge, Don E..
Brazil made a formal complaint to the World Trade Organization (WTO) Dispute Settlement Panel against U.S. cotton programs in 2003, alleging that these subsidies depressed world cotton price and were injurious to Brazilian farmers. The petition was supported by Australia and West and Central African cotton producing countries. After long deliberations, the WTO appellate body came out with their final ruling in March 2005 that upheld most of the initial decisions of the WTO Dispute Settlement Panel. In addition to the finding of serious price suppressing effects of U.S. cotton programs during the period 1999/00-2002/03, the ruling also included a June 30, 2005 deadline to withdraw Step 2 and export credit guarantee programs. In an attempt to comply with the...
Tipo: Report Palavras-chave: Agricultural and Food Policy.
Ano: 2005 URL: http://purl.umn.edu/53148
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U.S. Proposal for Doha Round WTO Negotiations: What's at Stake for the U.S. Cotton Industry AgEcon
Fadiga, Mohamadou L.; Mohanty, Samarendu; Welch, Mark; Pan, Suwen; Ethridge, Don E..
The Ministerial Declaration that emerged from the recently concluded World Trade Organization (WTO) ministerial conference in Hong Kong continued the efforts of members to reform and liberalize the world cotton market “…ambitiously, expeditiously, and specifically” (WTO, 2005). The special attention devoted to cotton serves as recognition of the nexus between trade and development and the potential role cotton plays as an engine of economic growth for some of the world’s least developed countries (LDCs). The emphasis on cotton also may indicate that agreement in this area may open the door to broader agreement on the agricultural sector in general.
Tipo: Report Palavras-chave: Agricultural and Food Policy.
Ano: 2006 URL: http://purl.umn.edu/53151
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U.S. Proposal for WTO Hong Kong Ministerial Conference: What's at Stake for Cotton Producers? AgEcon
Fadiga, Mohamadou L.; Mohanty, Samarendu; Pan, Suwen; Welch, Mark.
This study analyzed the cost to U.S. cotton producers of two policy alternatives under which the U.S. seeks to cut its total AMS payments for cotton by 60%. We considered two scenarios; the U.S. decides to act unilaterally versus conducting the policy initiative along with multilateral tariff and subsidy eliminations from the Rest of the World. The study found a 12% cut in target price and 8% cut in loan rate are necessary to reach the 60% AMS targeted reduction under the unilateral scenario. In that regards, U.S. net farm income decreases considerably despite an appreciation of U.S. farm price. Under a multilateral trade liberalization from the Rest of the World, a 9% cut in the loan rate and 4% in loan rate are enough to reach the AMS reduction...
Tipo: Conference Paper or Presentation Palavras-chave: United States; Hong Kong; Cotton subsidies; Tariff; Net farm income; International Relations/Trade; Q11; Q17.
Ano: 2006 URL: http://purl.umn.edu/21273
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World Cotton Outlook: Projections to 2015/16 AgEcon
Ethridge, Don E.; Welch, Mark; Pan, Suwen; Fadiga, Mohamadou L.; Mohanty, Samarendu.
The Global Fibers Model developed at the Cotton Economics Research Institute at Texas Tech University was used to generate 10-year projections of cotton and textile production, mill use, and trade for 24 countries/regions under specified assumptions for macroeconomic variables, weather, and policies/programs, referred to as the baseline. Global results and results for selected major countries are presented here. Results indicate a continued dominance of China in textile production and cotton trade, rising global production of cotton, and shifting cotton export market shares, with the U.S. losing and Brazil gaining.
Tipo: Working or Discussion Paper Palavras-chave: Agricultural and Food Policy.
Ano: 2006 URL: http://purl.umn.edu/53169
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