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Registros recuperados: 14
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Adaptive Comanagement in the Venice Lagoon? An Analysis of Current Water and Environmental Management Practices and Prospects for Change Ecology and Society
Munaretto, Stefania; University IUAV of Venice, Faculty of Urban and Regional Planning, Venice, Italy; VU University - Institute for Environmental Studies (IVM), Amsterdam, Netherlands; stefania.munaretto@ivm.vu.nl; Huitema, Dave; VU University - Institute for Environmental Studies (IVM), Amsterdam, Netherlands; dave.huitema@ivm.vu.nl.
Adaptive comanagement (ACM) is often suggested as a way of handling the modern challenges of environmental governance, which include uncertainty and complexity. ACM is a novel combination of the learning dimension of adaptive management and the linkage dimension of comanagement. As has been suggested, there is a need for more insight on enabling policy environments for ACM success and failure. Picking up on this agenda we provide a case study of the world famous Venice lagoon in Italy. We address the following questions: first, to what extent are four institutional prescriptions typically associated with ACM currently practiced in the Venice system? Second, to what extent is learning taking place in the Venice system? Third, how is learning related to the...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Adaptiveness; Comanagement; Governance; Institutions; Learning; Venice lagoon.
Ano: 2012
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“Letting the leaders pass”: barriers to using traditional ecological knowledge in comanagement as the basis of formal hunting regulations Ecology and Society
Padilla, Elisabeth; Resilience and Adaptation Program, University of Alaska Fairbanks; erobins@alaska.edu; Kofinas, Gary P.; Department of Humans and Environment and Institute of Arctic Biology, University of Alaska Fairbanks; gary.kofinas@alaska.edu.
We studied a case of failure in applying traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) in comanagement as the basis for formal hunting regulations. We based the study on the Porcupine Caribou (Rangifer tarandus) Herd “let the leaders pass” policy, established for the Dempster Highway of the Western Canadian Arctic, and identified conditions creating barriers in the successful application of TEK through comanagement. Stated as propositions, identified barriers include: (1) the context-specific nature of TEK limits its application in resource management regulations; (2) changes in traditional authority systems, hunting technology, and the social organization of harvesting caribou affect the effectiveness of TEK approaches in a contemporary...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Caribou; Comanagement; Traditional ecological knowledge; Wildlife management.
Ano: 2014
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An Integrated Approach to Analyzing (Adaptive) Comanagement Using the “Politicized” IAD Framework Ecology and Society
Whaley, Luke; Water Science Institute, Cranfield University; l.whaley@cranfield.ac.uk; Weatherhead, Edward K.; Water Science Institute, Cranfield University; k.weatherhead@cranfield.ac.uk.
Scholars of comanagement are faced with a difficult methodological challenge. As comanagement has evolved and diversified it has increasingly merged with the field of adaptive management and related concepts that derive from resilience thinking and complex adaptive systems theory. In addition to earlier considerations of power sharing, institution building, and trust, the adaptive turn in comanagement has brought attention to the process of social learning and a focus on concepts such as scale, self-organization, and system trajectory. At the same time, a number of scholars are calling for a more integrated approach to studying (adaptive) comanagement that is able to situate these normative concepts within a critical understanding of how context and power...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Synthesis Palavras-chave: Comanagement; Adaptive comanagement; IAD Framework; Politicized IAD Framework; Methodology; Institutions; Power; Discourse; Resilience.
Ano: 2014
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Comanagement of clams in Brazil: a framework to advance comparison Ecology and Society
Rocha, Ligia M.; Federal University of Rio Grande do Norte, Graduate Program in Ecology; ligiarocha1@gmail.com; Pinkerton, Evelyn; Simon Fraser University, School of Resource and Environmental Management; epinkert@sfu.ca.
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Artisanal fisheries; Clams; Comanagement; Fisherwomen; Marine protected areas; Shell fisheries.
Ano: 2015
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Culturally significant fisheries: keystones for management of freshwater social-ecological systems Ecology and Society
Noble, Mae; Fenner School of Environment and Society, The Australian National University; mae.noble@anu.edu.au; Duncan, Phil; Gamilaroi Traditional Owner, NSW Aboriginal Land Council; phil.duncan@alc.org.au; Perry, Darren; Murray Lower Darling Rivers Indigenous Nations; ngintait@gmail.com; Prosper, Kerry; Paq'tnekek Mi'kmaq First Nations; kerryp@paqtnkek.ca; Rose, Denis; Gunditj Mirring Traditional Owners Aboriginal Corporation; Denis@gunditjmirring.com; Schnierer, Stephan; School of Environment, Science and Engineering, Southern Cross University; stephan.schnierer@scu.edu.au; Tipa, Gail; Tipa and Associates Ltd.; gttipa@vodafone.co.nz; Williams, Erica; National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research; Erica.Williams@niwa.co.nz; Woods, Rene; National Cultural Flows Program; Murray Lower Darling River Indigenous Nations; woodsre83@gmail.com; Pittock, Jamie; Fenner School of Environment and Society, The Australian National University; jamie.pittock@anu.edu.au.
Indigenous peoples of North America, Australia, and New Zealand have a long tradition of harvesting freshwater animals. Over generations of reliance and subsistence harvesting, Indigenous peoples have acquired a profound understanding of these freshwater animals and ecosystems that have become embedded within their cultural identity. We have identified trans-Pacific parallels in the cultural significance of several freshwater animal groups, such as eels, other finfish, bivalves, and crayfish, to Indigenous peoples and their understanding and respect for the freshwater ecosystems on which their community survival depends. In recognizing such cultural connections, we found that non-Indigenous peoples can appreciate the deep significance of freshwater animals...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Synthesis Palavras-chave: Adaptive freshwater management; Aquatic resources; Bivalve; Comanagement; Crayfish; Cultural keystone species; Eel; Indigenous ecological knowledge; Indigenous water rights; Lamprey; Salmon; Social-ecological resilience.
Ano: 2016
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Does Participatory Planning Foster the Transformation Toward More Adaptive Social-Ecological Systems? Ecology and Society
Menzel, Susanne; Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research, Economics and Social Sciences; susanne.menzel@wsl.ch; Buchecker, Matthias; Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research, Economics and Social Sciences; matthias.buchecker@wsl.ch.
The need for social-ecological systems to become more adaptive is widely acknowledged. Social effects generated by participatory planning have been claimed to contribute to this transformation, but little empirical evidence is available that backs up or opposes this notion. We aimed to offer some insights regarding questions as to which social effects are formed in participatory planning processes and at what costs, and to then discuss their contribution to the transformation toward more adaptive social-ecological systems based on empirical evidence. Consequently, we investigated the social effects of participatory planning processes, including the social learning processes leading to them. We conducted semistructured interviews with members of advisory...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Comanagement; Participatory planning; Planning costs; Qualitative research; Social capital; Social learning; Time requirements.
Ano: 2013
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Exploring External Validity of Common Pool Resource Experiments: Insights from Artisanal Benthic Fisheries in Chile Ecology and Society
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Artisanal fisheries; Benthic resources; Comanagement; Common pool resources; Internalization of norms; Laboratory experiment; Small-scale fisheries; Territorial user rights.
Ano: 2013
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Indigenous Māori values and perspectives to inform freshwater management in Aotearoa-New Zealand Ecology and Society
Harmsworth, Garth; Tribal: Te Arawa, Ngāti Tūwharetoa, Ngāti Raukawa; Landcare Research; HarmsworthG@landcareresearch.co.nz; Awatere, Shaun; Tribal: Ngāti Porou; Landcare Research; AwatereS@landcareresearch.co.nz; Robb, Mahuru; Tribal: Ngāti Awa, Ngāti Ranginui; Landcare Research; RobbM@landcareresearch.co.nz.
In response to widespread water quality and quantity issues, the New Zealand Government has recently embarked on a number of comprehensive freshwater management reforms, developing a raft of national discussion and policy documents such as “Freshwater Reform 2013 and Beyond” and a National Policy Statement for freshwater management (NPS-FM 2014). Recent resource management reforms and amendments (RMA 2014), based on previous overarching resource management legislation (RMA 1991), set out a new approach and pathway to manage freshwater nationwide. Internationally, there is an increasing trend to engage with indigenous communities for research and collaboration, including indigenous groups as active participants in resource management...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Cogovernance; Collaboration; Comanagement; Coplanning; Cultural monitoring; Cultural values; Indigenous Mā Ori; Mā Ori knowledge; Mā Tauranga Mā Ori; Resource management.
Ano: 2016
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Individual transferable quota contribution to environmental stewardship: a theory in need of validation Ecology and Society
van Putten, Ingrid; CSIRO Wealth from Oceans National Research Flagship, CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research; Ingrid.vanputten@csiro.au; Boschetti, Fabio; CSIRO Wealth from Oceans National Research Flagship, CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research; fabio.Boschetti@csiro.au; Fulton, Elizabeth A.; CSIRO Wealth from Oceans National Research Flagship, CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research; beth.fulton@csiro.au; Smith, Anthony D. M.; CSIRO Wealth from Oceans National Research Flagship, CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research; tony.d.smith@csiro.au; Thebaud, Olivier; CSIRO Wealth from Oceans National Research Flagship, CSIRO Marine and Atmospheric Research; olivier.thebaud@csiro.au.
We explored the extent to which (1) individual transferable quotas (ITQs) may lead to changes in environmental stewardship and (2) environmental stewardship may in turn contribute to explain the success or otherwise of ITQs in meeting sustainability objectives. ITQs are an example of incentive-based fisheries management in which fishing rights can be privately owned and traded. ITQs are aimed at resolving the problems created by open-access fisheries. ITQs were proposed to promote economic efficiency, and there is growing empirical evidence that ITQs meet a number of economic and social fisheries management objectives. Even though improved stock status arises as a consequence of the total allowable catch levels implemented together with ITQs, the effect is...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Synthesis Palavras-chave: Comanagement; Environmental ethics; Fisheries management; Fishing rights; Stewardship.
Ano: 2014
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Individual transferable quota contribution to environmental stewardship: a theory in need of validation ArchiMer
Van Putten, Ingrid; Boschetti, Fabio; Fulton, Elizabeth A.; Smith, Anthony D.m.; Thebaud, Olivier.
We explored the extent to which (1) individual transferable quotas (ITQs) may lead to changes in environmental stewardship and (2) environmental stewardship may in turn contribute to explain the success or otherwise of ITQs in meeting sustainability objectives. ITQs are an example of incentive-based fisheries management in which fishing rights can be privately owned and traded. ITQs are aimed at resolving the problems created by open-access fisheries. ITQs were proposed to promote economic efficiency, and there is growing empirical evidence that ITQs meet a number of economic and social fisheries management objectives. Even though improved stock status arises as a consequence of the total allowable catch levels implemented together with ITQs, the effect is...
Tipo: Text Palavras-chave: Comanagement; Environmental ethics; Fisheries management; Fishing rights; Stewardship.
Ano: 2014 URL: http://archimer.ifremer.fr/doc/00250/36165/34720.pdf
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Is Validation of Indigenous Ecological Knowledge a Disrespectful Process? A Case Study of Traditional Fishing Poisons and Invasive Fish Management from the Wet Tropics, Australia Ecology and Society
Gratani, Monica; School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, James Cook University; monica.gratani@jcu.edu.au; Butler, James R. A. ; CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences, EcoSciences Precinct ; james.butler@csiro.au; Royee, Frank; Malanbarra Yidinji Elder;; Valentine, Peter; School of Earth and Environmental Sciences, James Cook University;; Burrows, Damien; Australian Centre for Tropical Freshwater Research, James Cook University;; Canendo, Warren I.; CSIRO Sustainable Ecosystems and Sustainable Agriculture Flagship, ATFI;; Anderson, Alex S; Centre for Tropical Biodiversity and Climate Change, School of Marine and Tropical Biology, James Cook University; alexander.anderson@my.jcu.edu.au.
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Comanagement; Fishing poisons; Indigenous ecological knowledge; Invasive fish; Knowledge socialization; Livelihoods; Poisonous plants; Social-ecological systems: tilapia; Traditional ecological knowledge; Validation.
Ano: 2011
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Power Asymmetries in Small-Scale Fisheries: a Barrier to Governance Transformability? Ecology and Society
Crona, Beatrice; Stockholm Resilience Center, Stockholm University, Sweden; beatrice.crona@stockholmresilience.su.se.
Both global and local environmental problems call for the transformation of many contemporary and unsustainable governance approaches. Therefore, recent interest has sprung up around factors that facilitate and hinder societies from transforming governance of natural resources. Using a social-network approach, we study links between informal power structures and knowledge sharing and consensus building. We examine how this interaction may have affected the (in)ability of a community to move from open-access to some form of collective action for resource management. Individuals occupying central positions in a knowledge network can be instrumental in determining which knowledge and interpretation of ecological signals is most dominant. If the same...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Comanagement; Governance; Local ecological knowledge; Natural resources; Power; Social networks; Transformation.
Ano: 2010
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Using Private Rights to Manage Natural Resources: Is Stewardship Linked to Ownership? Ecology and Society
Gilmour, Patrick W; Department of Zoology, The University of Melbourne; gilmourp@unimelb.edu.au; Day, Robert W; Department of Zoology, The University of Melbourne; r.day@unimelb.edu.au; Dwyer, Peter D; Department of Resource Management and Geography, The University of Melbourne; pddwyer@unimelb.edu.au.
There is increasing interest in privatizing natural resource systems to promote sustainability and conservation goals. Though economic theory suggests owners of private property rights have an incentive to act as resource stewards, few studies have tested this empirically. This paper asks whether private rights-owners were more conservative with respect to their management opinions than nonrights-owners in five Australian abalone (Haliotis spp.) fisheries. Multiple regression analyses were used to link opinions to demographic, economic, and attitudinal variables. In contrast to standard economic assumptions, nonrights-owners suggested more conservative catch limits than did rights-owners, confirming qualitative observations of behavior in management...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Australia; Comanagement; Fisheries; Individual transferable quota; Property rights; Stewardship; Sustainable behavior.
Ano: 2012
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Using the politicized institutional analysis and development framework to analyze (adaptive) comanagement: farming and water resources in England Ecology and Society
Whaley, Luke; Department of Geography, Kings College London; lukewhaley1@gmail.com; Weatherhead, Edward K.; Cranfield Water Science Institute, Cranfield University; k.weatherhead@cranfield.ac.uk.
The challenge of managing water resources in England is becoming increasingly complex and uncertain, a situation reflected in many countries around the world. Cooperative and participatory forms of governance are now seen as one way of addressing this challenge. We investigated this assertion by focusing on five farmer irrigator groups in the low-lying east of England. The groups’ relationship with water resources management was interpreted through the lens of comanagement, which over the past decade has increasingly merged with the field of adaptive management and related concepts that derive from resilience thinking and complex adaptive systems theory. Working within a critical realist paradigm, our analysis was guided by the politicized...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Adaptive comanagement; Comanagement; England; Farming; Politicized institutional analysis and development framework; Water resources.
Ano: 2015
Registros recuperados: 14
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