Sabiia Seb
PortuguêsEspañolEnglish
Embrapa
        Busca avançada

Botão Atualizar


Botão Atualizar

Ordenar por: RelevânciaAutorTítuloAnoImprime registros no formato resumido
Registros recuperados: 29
Primeira ... 12 ... Última
Imagem não selecionada

Imprime registro no formato completo
A decade of adaptive governance scholarship: synthesis and future directions Ecology and Society
Chaffin, Brian C.; Geography Program, College of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences, Oregon State University; chaffinb@geo.oregonstate.edu; Gosnell, Hannah; Geography Program, College of Earth, Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences, Oregon State University; gosnellh@geo.oregonstate.edu; Cosens, Barbara A.; College of Law and Waters of the West Program, University of Idaho; bcosens@uidaho.edu.
Adaptive governance is an emergent form of environmental governance that is increasingly called upon by scholars and practitioners to coordinate resource management regimes in the face of the complexity and uncertainty associated with rapid environmental change. Although the term “adaptive governance” is not exclusively applied to the governance of social-ecological systems, related research represents a significant outgrowth of literature on resilience, social-ecological systems, and environmental governance. We present a chronology of major scholarship on adaptive governance, synthesizing efforts to define the concept and identifying the array of governance concepts associated with transformation toward adaptive governance. Based...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Synthesis Palavras-chave: Adaptive governance; Environmental governance; Literature review; Resilience.
Ano: 2014
Imagem não selecionada

Imprime registro no formato completo
A Framework for Resilience-based Governance of Social-Ecological Systems Ecology and Society
Garmestani, Ahjond S; Environmental Protection Agency, USA; garmestani.ahjond@epa.gov; Benson, Melinda Harm; University of New Mexico, USA; mhbenson@unm.edu.
Panarchy provides a heuristic to characterize the cross-scale dynamics of social-ecological systems and a framework for how governance institutions should behave to be compatible with the ecosystems they manage. Managing for resilience will likely require reform of law to account for the dynamics of social-ecological systems and achieve a substantive mandate that accommodates the need for adaptation. In this paper, we suggest expansive legal reform by identifying the principles of reflexive law as a possible mechanism for achieving a shift to resilience-based governance and leveraging cross-scale dynamics to provide resilience-based responses to increasingly challenging environmental conditions.
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed article Palavras-chave: Adaptive governance; Adaptive management; Environmental governance; Intermediaries; Panarchy; Reflexive law; Resilience; Resilience-based governance.
Ano: 2013
Imagem não selecionada

Imprime registro no formato completo
Adaptive Comanagement: a Systematic Review and Analysis Ecology and Society
Plummer, Ryan; Brock University; Stockholm Resilience Centre; rplummer@brocku.ca; Crona, Beatrice; Stockholm Resilience Centre; beatrice.crona@stockholmresilience.su.se; Armitage, Derek R; University of Waterloo; darmitage@wlu.ca; Olsson, Per; Stockholm Resilience Centre; per.olsson@stockholmresilience.su.se; Yudina, Olga; Brock University; oy09dk@badger.ac.brocku.ca.
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Adaptive comanagement; Environmental governance; Systematic review.
Ano: 2012
Imagem não selecionada

Imprime registro no formato completo
Adaptive Comanagement and Its Relationship to Environmental Governance Ecology and Society
Plummer, Ryan; Brock University, Canada; Stockholm Resilience Centre, Sweden; ryan.plummer@brocku.ca; Armitage, Derek R; University of Waterloo, Canada; derek.armitage@uwaterloo.ca; de Loë, Rob C; University of Waterloo, Canada; rdeloe@uwaterloo.ca.
We provide a systematic review of the adaptive comanagement (ACM) literature to (i) investigate how the concept of governance is considered and (ii) examine what insights ACM offers with reference to six key concerns in environmental governance literature: accountability and legitimacy; actors and roles; fit, interplay, and scale; adaptiveness, flexibility, and learning; evaluation and monitoring; and, knowledge. Findings from the systematic review uncover a complicated relationship with evidence of conceptual closeness as well as relational ambiguities. The findings also reveal several specific contributions from the ACM literature to each of the six key environmental governance concerns, including applied strategies for sharing power and responsibility...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Adaptive comanagement; Adaptive governance; Environmental governance; Integrated management; Multilevel governance; Resilience; Systematic review.
Ano: 2013
Imagem não selecionada

Imprime registro no formato completo
Applying a synthetic approach to the resilience of Finnish reindeer herding as a changing livelihood Ecology and Society
Sarkki, Simo; Cultural Anthropology, University of Oulu, Finland; simo.sarkki@oulu.fi; Komu, Teresa; Cultural Anthropology, University of Oulu, Finland; Teresa.komu@oulu.fi; Heikkinen, Hannu I; Cultural Anthropology, University of Oulu, Finland; hannu.i.heikkinen@oulu.fi; Herva, Vesa-Pekka; Archaeology, University of Oulu, Finland; vesa-pekka.herva@oulu.fi.
Reindeer herding is an emblematic livelihood for Northern Finland, culturally important for local people and valuable in tourism marketing. We examine the livelihood resilience of Finnish reindeer herding by narrowing the focus of general resilience on social-ecological systems (SESs) to a specific livelihood while also acknowledging wider contexts in which reindeer herding is embedded. The questions for specified resilience can be combined with the applied DPSIR approach (Drivers; Pressures: resilience to what; State: resilience of what; Impacts: resilience for whom; Responses: resilience by whom and how). This paper is based on a synthesis of the authors’ extensive anthropological fieldwork on reindeer herding and other land uses in Northern...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Synthesis Palavras-chave: Adaptation; Cumulative pressures; DPSIR approach; Environmental governance; Land use; Livelihood resilience; Pastoralism.
Ano: 2016
Imagem não selecionada

Imprime registro no formato completo
Applying the system viability framework for cross-scalar governance of nested social-ecological systems in the Guiana Shield, South America Ecology and Society
Berardi, Andrea; The Open University; andrea.berardi@open.ac.uk; Mistry, Jayalaxshmi; Royal Holloway University of London; j.mistry@rhul.ac.uk; Bignante, Elisa; Department of Cultures, Politics and Society, University of Torino; elisa.bignante@unito.it; Davis, Odacy; Iwokrama International Centre; odacyd@gmail.com; Haynes, Lakeram; North Rupununi District Development Board; lakehays@gmail.com; Benjamin, Ryan; North Rupununi District Development Board; garybejamin@gmail.com; Albert, Grace; North Rupununi District Development Board; grace.albert.cobra@gmail.com; Xavier, Rebecca; North Rupununi District Development Board; rebeccaxavier86@gmail.com; Jafferally, Deirdre; Iwokrama International Centre; deirdre.jafferally@gmail.com.
Linking and analyzing governance of natural resources at different scales requires the development of a conceptual framework for analyzing social-ecological systems that can be easily applied by a range of stakeholders whose interests lie at different scales, but where the results of the analysis can be compared in a straightforward way. We outline the system viability framework, which allows participants to characterize a range of strategies in response to environment challenges for maintaining the long-term survival of their particular system of interest. Working in the Guiana Shield, South America, and with a range of local, regional, and international stakeholders, our aim was to use system viability to (1) investigate synergies and conflicts between...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Brazil; Environmental governance; Guiana Shield; Guyana; Natural resource management; Participatory video; Sustainability indicators; System viability.
Ano: 2015
Imagem não selecionada

Imprime registro no formato completo
Boundary Work: Engaging Knowledge Systems in Co-management of Feral Animals on Indigenous Lands Ecology and Society
Robinson, Catherine J; CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences; catherine.robinson@csiro.au; Wallington, Tabatha J; CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences; Tabatha.Wallington@csiro.au.
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Co-benefits; Co-managed boundary work; Collaboration; Environmental governance; Feral animal management; Indigenous knowledge; Knowledge-action systems.
Ano: 2012
Imagem não selecionada

Imprime registro no formato completo
Building institutional capacity for environmental governance through social entrepreneurship: lessons from Canadian biosphere reserves Ecology and Society
George, Colleen; School of Environment and Sustainability, University of Saskatchewan; colleen.george@usask.ca; Reed, Maureen G.; School of Environment and Sustainability, University of Saskatchewan; m.reed@usask.ca.
Sustainability-oriented organizations have typically adopted governance approaches that undertake community participation and collaboration through multistakeholder arrangements. Documented challenges of this model are associated with collaboration and institutional capacity, and include reactive accountability structures, inability to reach consensus, funding limitations, and lack of innovation. Social entrepreneurship is a model used successfully in other social sectors; yet, it has rarely been explored by sustainability-oriented organizations. Nevertheless, research in other sectors has found that social entrepreneurship models of governance can encourage diverse participation from a wide range of social groups. In this paper we consider the value of...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Biosphere reserves; Collaboration; Environmental governance; Institutional capacity; Social entrepreneurship.
Ano: 2016
Imagem não selecionada

Imprime registro no formato completo
Can Adaptive Comanagement Help to Address the Challenges of Climate Change Adaptation? Ecology and Society
Plummer, Ryan; Brock University, Canada; Stockholm Resilience Centre, Sweden; ryan.plummer@brocku.ca.
A shift is taking place within environmental governance that draws attention to modes and instruments that respond to system dynamics, uncertainty, and contested values. Adaptive comanagement is one process being advanced to make governance operational as it emphasizes collaboration among diverse actors, functions across scales and levels, and fosters learning though iterative feedback. Although extensive experience with adaptive comanagement has been gained in relation to other environmental and resource issues, its potential contribution to the governance of adaption is largely unexplored. This paper probes how adaptive comanagement might offer support to climate change adaptation and identifies gaps in knowledge requiring attention. In drawing upon...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Synthesis Palavras-chave: Adaptive capacity; Adaptive comanagement; Adaptive responses; Climate change adaptation; Environmental governance.
Ano: 2013
Imagem não selecionada

Imprime registro no formato completo
Certifying the commons: eco-certification, privatization, and collective action Ecology and Society
Foley, Paul; Environmental Policy Institute, Memorial University, Grenfell Campus; pfoley@grenfell.mun.ca; McCay, Bonnie; Department of Human Ecology, Rutgers the State University; mccay@AESOP.RUTGERS.EDU.
We examine new dynamics of privatization and collective action in common pool resource situations facilitated by the nonstate multistakeholder institutions of the Marine Stewardship Council (MSC), the global leader in sustainability certification for wild caught seafood. Through a review of the literature and two case studies of fishing cooperatives in Baja California Sur, Mexico and on Fogo Island in the Canadian Province of Newfoundland and Labrador (NL), we advance two interrelated arguments. First, certification and eco-labeling institutions privatize fisheries governance in largely unexamined ways through the injection of new forms of exclusive rights or privileges into common pool resource situations already complicated by access and property...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Baja California Sur Mexico; Collective action; Common pool resources; Commons; Community-based fisheries; Cooperatives; Environmental certification; Environmental governance; Fisheries; Fogo Island Newfoundland and Labrador Canada; Governance; Marine Stewardship Council; MSC; Northern shrimp; Privatization; Property rights; Spiny lobster; Sustainable.
Ano: 2014
Imagem não selecionada

Imprime registro no formato completo
Community owned solutions: identifying local best practices for social-ecological sustainability Ecology and Society
Mistry, Jayalaxshmi; Royal Holloway University of London, UK; j.mistry@rhul.ac.uk; Berardi, Andrea; The Open University, UK; andrea.berardi@open.ac.uk; Bignante, Elisa; University of Torino, Italy; elisa.bignante@unito.it; Haynes, Lakeram; North Rupununi District Development Board, Guyana; lakehays@gmail.com; Benjamin, Ryan; North Rupununi District Development Board, Guyana; garybejamin@gmail.com; Albert, Grace; North Rupununi District Development Board, Guyana; grace.albert.cobra@gmail.com; Xavier, Rebecca; North Rupununi District Development Board, Guyana; rebeccaxavier86@gmail.com; Robertson, Bernie; North Rupununi District Development Board, Guyana; robertsotis1@yahoo.com; Davis, Odacy; Iwokrama International Centre, Guyana; odacyd@gmail.com; Jafferally, Deirdre; Iwokrama International Centre, Guyana; deirdre.jafferally@gmail.com.
Policies and actions that come from higher scale structures, such as international bodies and national governments, are not always compatible with the realities and perspectives of smaller scale units including indigenous communities. Yet, it is at this local social-ecological scale that mechanisms and solutions for dealing with unpredictability and change can be increasingly seen emerging from across the world. Although there is a large body of knowledge specifying the conditions necessary to promote local governance of natural resources, there is a parallel need to develop practical methods for operationalizing the evaluation of local social-ecological systems. In this paper, we report on a systemic, participatory, and visual approach for engaging local...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Best practices; Community owned solutions; Environmental governance; Guiana Shield; Guyana; Indigenous; Participatory; System viability; Visual.
Ano: 2016
Imagem não selecionada

Imprime registro no formato completo
Coproductive capacities: rethinking science-governance relations in a diverse world Ecology and Society
van Kerkhoff, Lorrae E.; The Australian National University; lorrae.vankerkhoff@anu.edu.au; Lebel, Louis; Chiang Mai University, Thailand; llebel@loxinfo.co.th.
Tackling major environmental change issues requires effective partnerships between science and governance, but relatively little work in this area has examined the diversity of settings from which such partnerships may, or may not, emerge. In this special feature we draw on experiences from around the world to demonstrate and investigate the consequences of diverse capacities and capabilities in bringing science and governance together. We propose the concept of coproductive capacities as a useful new lens through which to examine these relations. Coproductive capacity is “the combination of scientific resources and governance capability that shapes the extent to which a society, at various levels, can operationalize relationships between...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Synthesis Palavras-chave: Capacity development; Coproduction; Environmental governance; Environmental policy; Knowledge; Scale; Science-policy interface; Sustainable development.
Ano: 2015
Imagem não selecionada

Imprime registro no formato completo
Ecologically sustainable but unjust? Negotiating equity and authority in common-pool marine resource management Ecology and Society
Klain, Sarah C; University of British Columbia; s.klain.ubc@gmail.com; Beveridge, Rachelle; University of Victoria; rachelle.beveridge@gmail.com; Bennett, Nathan J; Univeristy of British Columbia; Visiting Research Fellow at University of Victoria; nathan.bennett@ubc.ca.
Under appropriate conditions, community-based fisheries management can support sound resource stewardship, with positive social and environmental outcomes. Evaluating indigenous peoples’ involvement in commercial sea cucumber and geoduck fisheries on the central coast of British Columbia, Canada, we found that the current social-ecological system configuration is relatively ecologically sustainable according to stock assessments. However, the current system also results in perceived inequities in decision-making processes, harvesting allocations, and socioeconomic benefits. As a result, local coastal resource managers envision a transformation of sea cucumber and geoduck fisheries governance and management institutions. We assessed the potential...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Benthic fisheries; Common-pool resources; CPR design principles; Environmental governance; Indigenous or aboriginal peoples; Resource management; Small-scale fisheries; Social-ecological system framework.
Ano: 2014
Imagem não selecionada

Imprime registro no formato completo
Environmental governance analysis for REDD+ implementation in the municipality of Cachoeiras de Macacu, Brazil. Repositório Alice
ADRIAN, F.; ROBLEDO, M. A.; ALFONSO, S. P.; MONTEIRO, J. M. G..
2013
Tipo: Resumo em anais de congresso (ALICE) Palavras-chave: Cachoeiras de Macacu; Environmental governance; Feasibility; Mata Atlantica; Political ecology; REDD+.
Ano: 2013 URL: http://www.alice.cnptia.embrapa.br/handle/doc/970914
Imagem não selecionada

Imprime registro no formato completo
Environmental Governance, Globalisation and Economic Performance AgEcon
Tisdell, Clement A..
Increasing globalisation of economic activity and accompanying economic growth have been factors in the worldwide loss of natural environments and biodiversity loss, and these losses have accelerated since the beginning of the Industrial Revolution, Emissions of many types of pollutants and wastes from human activity are rising globally and are exceeding the capacity of natural environments to absorb and neutralize them. This problem is exacerbated by the fact that the quality and size of some natural sinks for neutralizing them (such as forests) are declining. Consequently, these wastes are accumulating in many environments and pose a growing threat to human welfare and to sustainable economic development. There are, for instance, global concerns about...
Tipo: Working or Discussion Paper Palavras-chave: Environmental economics; Environmental governance; Environmental law; Environmental regulation; Globalisation; Global warming; Greenhouse gases; Transboundary pollution; Transboundary natural resources.; Environmental Economics and Policy.
Ano: 2009 URL: http://purl.umn.edu/55341
Imagem não selecionada

Imprime registro no formato completo
Governance of Aquatic Agricultural Systems: Analyzing Representation, Power, and Accountability Ecology and Society
Ratner, Blake D.; WorldFish; b.ratner@cgiar.org; Cohen, Philippa; ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University; WorldFish; p.cohen@cgiar.org; Barman, Benoy; WorldFish; b.barman@cgiar.org; Mam, Kosal; WorldFish; k.mam@cgiar.org; Nagoli, Joseph; WorldFish; j.nagoli@cgiar.org; Allison, Edward H.; School of International Development, University of East Anglia; WorldFish; e.allison@cgiar.org.
Aquatic agricultural systems in developing countries face increasing competition from multiple stakeholders over rights to access and use natural resources, land, water, wetlands, and fisheries, essential to rural livelihoods. A key implication is the need to strengthen governance to enable equitable decision making amidst competition that spans sectors and scales, building capacities for resilience, and for transformations in institutions that perpetuate poverty. In this paper we provide a simple framework to analyze the governance context for aquatic agricultural system development focused on three dimensions: stakeholder representation, distribution of power, and mechanisms of accountability. Case studies from Cambodia, Bangladesh, Malawi/Mozambique,...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Accountability; Bangladesh; Cambodia; Civil society; Coastal zone management; Environmental governance; Livelihoods; Malawi; Mozambique; Power; Social-ecological resilience; Solomon Islands; Stakeholder representation; Wetlands.
Ano: 2013
Imagem não selecionada

Imprime registro no formato completo
Governance, Scale and the Environment: The Importance of Recognizing Knowledge Claims in Transdisciplinary Arenas Ecology and Society
Buizer, Marleen; Centre of Excellence on Climate Change Woodland and Forest Health; m.buizer@murdoch.edu.au; Arts, Bas; Forest and Nature Conservation Policy Group, Wageningen University and Research Centre; bas.arts@wur.nl; Kok, Kasper; Land Dynamics Group, Wageningen University and Research Centre; Kasper.Kok@wur.nl.
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Environmental governance; Knowledge claims; Scale science-policy interface; Transdisciplinarity.
Ano: 2011
Imagem não selecionada

Imprime registro no formato completo
How Participation Creates Citizens: Participatory Governance as Performative Practice Ecology and Society
Turnhout, Esther; Forest and Nature Conservation Policy Group, Wageningen University; esther.turnhout@wur.nl; Van Bommel, Severine; Forest and Nature Conservation Policy Group, Wageningen University ; severine.vanbommel@wur.nl; Aarts, Noelle; Communication Science Group, Wageningen University; ASCoR (Amsterdam School for Communication Research), University of Amsterdam ; noelle.aarts@wur.nl.
Participation is a prominent feature of many decision-making and planning processes. Among its proclaimed benefits is its potential to strengthen public support and involvement. However, participation is also known for having unintended consequences which lead to failures in meeting its objectives. This article takes a critical perspective on participation by discussing how participation may influence the ways in which citizens can become involved. Participation unavoidably involves (1) restrictions about who should be involved and about the space for negotiation, (2) assumptions about what the issue at stake is, and (3) expectations about what the outcome of participation should be and how the participants are expected to behave. This is illustrated by...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Citizenship; Environmental governance; Nature conservation policy; Participation; Performance; Stakeholders.
Ano: 2010
Imagem não selecionada

Imprime registro no formato completo
Learning from one another: evaluating the impact of horizontal knowledge exchange for environmental management and governance Ecology and Society
Mistry, Jayalaxshmi; Royal Holloway University of London, UK; j.mistry@rhul.ac.uk; Berardi, Andrea; The Open University, UK; andrea.berardi@open.ac.uk; Bignante, Elisa; University of Torino, Italy; elisa.bignante@unito.it; Simpson, Matthew; Wildfowl & Wetlands Trust (Consulting) Ltd, UK; matthew.simpson@wwtconsulting.co.uk; Haynes, Lakeram; North Rupununi District Development Board, Guyana; lakehays@gmail.com; Benjamin, Ryan; North Rupununi District Development Board, Guyana; garybejamin@gmail.com; Albert, Grace; North Rupununi District Development Board, Guyana; grace.albert.cobra@gmail.com; Xavier, Rebecca; North Rupununi District Development Board, Guyana; rebeccaxavier86@gmail.com; Robertson, Bernie; North Rupununi District Development Board, Guyana; robertsotis1@yahoo.com; Davis, Odacy; Iwokrama International Centre, Guyana; odacyd@gmail.com; Verwer, Caspar; IUCN National Committee of The Netherlands, The Netherlands; caspar.verwer@iucn.nl; Jafferally, Deirdre; Iwokrama International Centre, Guyana; deirdre.jafferally@gmail.com.
There is increasing advocacy for inclusive community-based approaches to environmental management, and growing evidence that involving communities improves the sustainability of social-ecological systems. Most community-based approaches rely on partnerships and knowledge exchange between communities, civil society organizations, and professionals such as practitioners and/or scientists. However, few models have actively integrated more horizontal knowledge exchange from community to community. We reflect on the transferability of community owned solutions between indigenous communities by exploring challenges and achievements of community peer-to-peer knowledge exchange as a way of empowering communities to face up to local environmental and social...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Best practices; Community owned solutions; Environmental governance; Guiana Shield; Guyana; Indigenous; Knowledge exchange; Participatory; Visual.
Ano: 2016
Imagem não selecionada

Imprime registro no formato completo
Multilevel governance in community-based environmental management: a case study comparison from Latin America Ecology and Society
Sattler, Claudia; Leibniz-Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research (ZALF), Institute of Socio-Economics; csattler@zalf.de; Meyer, Angela; Organisation for International Dialogue and Conflict Management; angela.meyer@idialog.eu; Giersch, Gregor; Organisation for International Dialogue and Conflict Management; gregor.giersch@idialog.eu; Meyer, Claas; Leibniz-Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research (ZALF), Institute of Socio-Economics; claas.meyer@zalf.de; Matzdorf, Bettina; Leibniz-Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research (ZALF), Institute of Socio-Economics; matzdorf@zalf.de.
We analyze four case studies from Latin America using the concept of multilevel governance to assess at what vertical and horizontal levels and in what roles various state, market, and civil society actors interact for successful community-based environmental management (CBEM). In particular, we address the problem of how a conflict over natural resources with high negative impacts on the livelihoods of the respective communities could be overcome by a governance change that resulted in a multilevel governance arrangement for CBEM. The analysis involves a mixed-methods approach that combines a variety of empirical methods in social research such as field visits, personal interviews, participant observations, and stakeholder workshops. To visualize results,...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Civil society; Community management; Ecosystem services; Environmental governance; Intermediaries; Natural resource management.
Ano: 2016
Registros recuperados: 29
Primeira ... 12 ... Última
 

Empresa Brasileira de Pesquisa Agropecuária - Embrapa
Todos os direitos reservados, conforme Lei n° 9.610
Política de Privacidade
Área restrita

Embrapa
Parque Estação Biológica - PqEB s/n°
Brasília, DF - Brasil - CEP 70770-901
Fone: (61) 3448-4433 - Fax: (61) 3448-4890 / 3448-4891 SAC: https://www.embrapa.br/fale-conosco

Valid HTML 4.01 Transitional