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Registros recuperados: 4
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Effects of Roads on Animal Abundance: an Empirical Review and Synthesis Ecology and Society
Fahrig, Lenore; Carleton University, Geomatics and Landscape Ecology Laboratory, Department of Biology; lfahrig@ccs.carleton.ca; Rytwinski, Trina; Carleton University, Geomatics and Landscape Ecology Laboratory, Department of Biology; trytwins@connect.carleton.ca.
We attempted a complete review of the empirical literature on effects of roads and traffic on animal abundance and distribution. We found 79 studies, with results for 131 species and 30 species groups. Overall, the number of documented negative effects of roads on animal abundance outnumbered the number of positive effects by a factor of 5; 114 responses were negative, 22 were positive, and 56 showed no effect. Amphibians and reptiles tended to show negative effects. Birds showed mainly negative or no effects, with a few positive effects for some small birds and for vultures. Small mammals generally showed either positive effects or no effect, mid-sized mammals showed either negative effects or no effect, and large mammals showed predominantly negative...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Synthesis Palavras-chave: Environmental impact; Landscape connectivity; Mortality; Population density; Road network; Road density; Road effect zone; Road mitigation; Species distribution; Species richness; Traffic density; Traffic volume.
Ano: 2009
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Homing behavior of Philander frenatus (Didelphimorphia, Didelphidae) across a fragmented landscape in the atlantic forest of Brazil Mastozool. neotrop.
Prevedello,Jayme A.; Delciellos,Ana C.; Vieira,Marcus V..
We report the first record of homing behavior of a Neotropical marsupial, the opossum Philander frenatus. The individual studied returned to the home forest fragment where it was captured (1050 m away) crossing a hostile matrix, instead moving to a much closer fragment (50 m distant). Movements did not follow wind or the direction of the closest fragment, but they were significantly oriented towards the home fragment. The individual probably had previous experience with the release site. This unique observation suggests that the ability of P. frenatus to overcome the effects of habitat fragmentation may be higher than considered previously.
Tipo: Info:eu-repo/semantics/article Palavras-chave: Landscape connectivity; Marsupials; Matrix use; Movements; Perceptual range.
Ano: 2009 URL: http://www.scielo.org.ar/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0327-93832009000200022
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Landscape Connectivity as a Function of Scale and Organism Vagility in a Real Forested Landscape Ecology and Society
D'Eon, Robert G; Self-employed; rdeon@interchange.ubc.ca; Glenn, Susan M; Department of Forest Sciences, University of British Columbia; SGlenn@gccnj.edu; Parfitt, Ian; Selkirk College; iparfitt@selkirk.ca.
Landscape connectivity is considered a vital element of landscape structure because of its importance to population survival. The difficulty surrounding the notion of landscape connectivity is that it must be assessed at the scale of the interaction between an organism and the landscape. We present a unique method for measuring connectivity between patches as a function of organism vagility. We used this approach to assess connectivity between harvest, old-growth, and recent wildfire patches in a real forested landscape in southeast British Columbia. By varying a distance criterion, habitat patches were considered connected and formed habitat clusters if they fell within this critical distance. The amount of area and distance to edge within clusters at...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: British Columbia; Dispersal; Forest fragmentation; Landscape connectivity; Marten; Northern flying squirrel; Northern goshawk; Scale; Vagility.
Ano: 2002
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Lattice-work corridors for climate change: a conceptual framework for biodiversity conservation and social-ecological resilience in a tropical elevational gradient Ecology and Society
Townsend, Patricia A; University of Washington; ptownsen@uw.edu; Masters, Karen L; Council on International Educational Exchange; KMasters@ciee.org.
Rapid climate change poses complex challenges for conservation, especially in tropical developing countries where biodiversity is high while financial and technical resources are limited. The complexity is heightened by uncertainty in predicted effects, both for ecological systems and human communities that depend heavily on natural resource extraction and use. Effective conservation plans and measures must be inexpensive, fast-acting, and able to increase the resilience of both the ecosystem and the social-ecological system. We present conservation practitioners with a framework that strategically integrates climate change planning into connectivity measures for tropical mountain ecosystems in Costa Rica. We propose a strategy for doubling the amount of...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Insight Palavras-chave: Buffer capacity; Climate adaptation; Community involvement; Conservation incentives; Costa Rica; Environmental services payments; Forest landscape restoration; Habitat priority-setting; Landscape connectivity; Reforestation; Resilient ecosystems; Resilient livelihoods; Riparian zones; Tropical mountain ecosystems.
Ano: 2015
Registros recuperados: 4
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