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Registros recuperados: 7
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A Classification Framework for Running Adaptive Management Rapids Ecology and Society
Harm Benson, Melinda; University of New Mexico; mhbenson@unm.edu; Morrison, Ryan R.; University of New Mexico; rmorriso@unm.edu; Stone, Mark C.; University of New Mexico; stone@unm.edu.
While adaptive management (AM) is becoming a preferred natural resource management approach, the conditions necessary to engage in AM are not always present. In order for AM to work, there must be an ability to engage in experimentation and then incorporate what is learned. Just as few rivers are unequivocally either “runnable” or “unrunnable” by a whitewater boater, successful AM depends on a number of factors, including legal frameworks and requirements, resource allocation regimes, and existing infrastructure. We provide a classification framework for assessing the physical and institutional capacity necessary for AM using the international classification for whitewater. We then apply this classification framework...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Insight Palavras-chave: Adaptive management; Conceptual model; Rio Chama; River restoration.
Ano: 2013
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Compromised Rivers: Understanding Historical Human Impacts on Rivers in the Context of Restoration Ecology and Society
Wohl, Ellen; Colorado State University; ellenw@cnr.colostate.edu.
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: River restoration; Colorado Front Range; Historical land use.
Ano: 2005
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Ecology, Planning, and River Management in the United States: Some Historical Reflections Ecology and Society
Reuss, Martin; U.S. Army Corps of Engineers; Martin.A.Reuss@HQ02.USACE.ARMY.MIL.
River ecologists are also river-basin planners. However, their role in planning has developed slowly over the decades since the beginning of the 20th century. Three major factors explain this phenomenon. First, ecologists focused on plant and animal communities rather than on broader policy issues related to land settlement and water development. Second, the federal government, and most state and local governments as well, used mainly economic criteria to justify projects. Intangible benefits, including the value of species or an aesthetically pleasing landscape, drew relatively little attention. Third, the public generally favored development, especially during the Great Depression of the 1930s. Only after World War II did the public's position shift in...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: History; Ecology; River basins; Water management; Planning; Benefit-cost analysis; Multiobjective planning; River restoration; Geomorphology.
Ano: 2005
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Inside the “Black Box” of River Restoration: Using Catchment History to Identify Disturbance and Response Mechanisms to Set Targets for Process-Based Restoration Ecology and Society
Mika, Sarah; School of Environmental and Rural Science, University of New England, Australia; sarah.mika@une.edu.au; Hoyle, Joanna; Department of Environment and Geography, Macquarie University;; Kyle, Garreth; Department of Biological Sciences, Macquarie University;; Howell, Timothy; Australian Rivers Institute, Griffith University;; Wolfenden, Benjamin; School of Environmental and Rural Science, University of New England, Australia;; Ryder, Darren; School of Environmental and Rural Science, University of New England, Australia; darren.ryder@une.edu.au; Keating, Daniel; Department of Environment and Geography, Macquarie University;; Boulton, Andrew; School of Environmental and Rural Science, University of New England, Australia;; Brierley, Gary; School of Geography, Geology and Environmental Science, University of Auckland;; Brooks, Andrew P; Australian Rivers Institute, Griffith University;; Fryirs, Kirstie; Department of Environment and Geography, Macquarie University;; Leishman, Michelle; Department of Biological Sciences, Macquarie University;; Sanders, Mark; Department of Environment and Geography, Macquarie University;; Arthington, Angela; Australian Rivers Institute, Griffith University;; Creese, Robert; NSW Department of Industry and Innovation, Port Stephens Fisheries Centre, Australia;; Dahm, Mark; School of Environmental and Rural Science, University of New England, Australia;; Miller, Craig; Department of Environment and Geography, Macquarie University;; Pusey, Brad; Australian Rivers Institute, Griffith University;; Spink, Alexandra; Department of Environment and Geography, Macquarie University;.
Many river restoration projects fail. Inadequate project planning underpins many of the reasons given for failure (such as setting overly ambitious goals; selecting inappropriate sites and techniques; losing stakeholder motivation; and neglecting to monitor, assess, and document projects). Another major problem is the lack of an agreed guiding image to direct the activities aimed at restoring the necessary biophysical and ecological processes within the logistic constraints of on-ground works. Despite a rich literature defining the components of restoration project planning, restoration ecology currently lacks an explicit and logical means of moving from the initial project vision through to on-ground strategies. Yet this process is fundamental because it...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Catchment history; Complex ecological systems; Conceptual modeling; Disturbance and response mechanisms; Guiding image; Hunter River Australia; Interdisciplinary research; Process-based restoration; River restoration.
Ano: 2010
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Restoring Riparian Ecosystems: The Challenge of Accommodating Variability and Designing Restoration Trajectories Ecology and Society
Hughes, Francine M. R; Anglia Polytechnic University; f.hughes@apu.ac.uk; Colston, Adrian; Wicken Fen National Nature Reserve; adrian.colston@nationaltrust.org.uk; Mountford, J. Owen; NERC Centre for Ecology and Hydrology; om@ceh.ac.uk.
Flood disturbance processes play a key role in the functioning of riparian ecosystems and in the maintenance of biodiversity along river corridors. As a result, riparian ecosystems can be described as mobile habitat mosaics characterized by variability and unpredictability. Any river restoration initiative should aim to mimic these attributes. This paper suggests that there needs to be an increased institutional capacity to accept some levels of both variability and unpredictability in the ecological outcomes of river restoration projects. Restoration projects have frequently used some form of historical or contemporary reference system to define objectives and to help in the evaluation process. Using these reference systems can give a false sense of the...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Synthesis Palavras-chave: River restoration; Predictability; Variability; Restoration trajectories; Reference systems; Wicken Fen; Floodplain forests; Restoration objectives; Restoration evaluation.
Ano: 2005
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River Restoration and Meanders Ecology and Society
Kondolf, G. Mathias; University of California - Berkeley; kondolf@berkeley.edu.
Among the most visually striking river restoration projects are those that involve the creation of a new channel, often in a new alignment and generally with a form and dimensions that are different from those of the preproject channel. These channel reconstruction projects often have the objective of creating a stable, single-thread, meandering channel, even on rivers that were not historically meandering, on rivers whose sediment load and flow regime would not be consistent with such stable channels, or on already sinuous channels whose bends are not symmetrical. Such meandering channels are often specified by the Rosgen classification system, a popular restoration design approach. Although most projects of this type have not been subject to objective...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: River restoration; Meandering channels; Cultural preferences; Channel classification.
Ano: 2006
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The Penobscot River, Maine, USA: a Basin-Scale Approach to Balancing Power Generation and Ecosystem Restoration Ecology and Society
Opperman, Jeffrey J; The Nature Conservancy; jopperman@tnc.org; Royte, Joshua; The Nature Conservancy; capse@tnc.org; Banks, John; Penobscot Indian Nation; John.Banks@penobscotnation.org; Rose Day, Laura; Penobscot River Restoration Trust; laura@penobscotriver.org; Apse, Colin; The Nature Conservancy; jroyte@tnc.org.
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed article Palavras-chave: Atlantic salmon; Dam removal; Hydropower; River restoration.
Ano: 2011
Registros recuperados: 7
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