Sabiia Seb
PortuguêsEspañolEnglish
Embrapa
        Busca avançada

Botão Atualizar


Botão Atualizar

Ordenar por: 

RelevânciaAutorTítuloAno

Imprime registros no formato resumido
Registros recuperados: 5
Primeira ... 1 ... Última
Imagem não selecionada

Imprime registro no formato completo
Connecting knowledge with action through coproductive capacities: adaptive governance and connectivity conservation Ecology and Society
Wyborn, Carina A; College of Forestry and Conservation, University of Montana; carina.wyborn@umontana.edu.
Effective adaptive governance will emerge from strong relationships between science, governance, and practice. However, these relationships receive scant critical attention among adaptive governance scholarship. To address this lacuna, Jasanoff’s “idiom of coproduction” provides a lens to view the dialectical relationships between science and society. This view sees science and governance as coevolving through iterative relationships between the material, cognitive, social, and normative dimensions of a problem. This coevolution is precisely the aspiration of adaptive governance; however, the abstract notion of coproduction must be grounded to provide practical guidance for groups aspiring to “govern...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Adaptive capacity; Adaptive governance; Boundary organizations; Bridging organizations; Connectivity conservation; Coproduction; Coproductive capacities.
Ano: 2015
Imagem não selecionada

Imprime registro no formato completo
Seeking our shared wisdom: a framework for understanding knowledge coproduction and coproductive capacities Ecology and Society
Schuttenberg, H. Z.; School of Biological Sciences and Centre for Sustainable International Development, University of Aberdeen, UK; currently with the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), E3 Bureau, Office of Forestry and Biodiversity; Heidi.Schuttenberg@gmail.com; Guth, Heidi K.; Kai Hoʻoulu LLLC and Polynesian Voyaging Society; HeidiKai@gmail.com.
The widespread disconnect between scientific projections of climate change and the implementation of responsive management actions has escalated calls for knowledge production processes able to exercise a stronger voice in decision making. Recently, the concept of coproduction has been championed as a potential answer. The term ‘knowledge coproduction’ is used loosely in the literature to describe an inclusive, iterative approach to creating new information; it is distinguished by its focus on facilitating interactions between stakeholders to develop an integrated or transformational understanding of a sustainability problem. Whether a coproduction process is successful in this integration of science and policy depends on a range of...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Insight Palavras-chave: Climate change; Coproduction; Coral reef management; Governance; Traditional ecological knowledge.
Ano: 2015
Imagem não selecionada

Imprime registro no formato completo
Coproductive capacities: rethinking science-governance relations in a diverse world Ecology and Society
van Kerkhoff, Lorrae E.; The Australian National University; lorrae.vankerkhoff@anu.edu.au; Lebel, Louis; Chiang Mai University, Thailand; llebel@loxinfo.co.th.
Tackling major environmental change issues requires effective partnerships between science and governance, but relatively little work in this area has examined the diversity of settings from which such partnerships may, or may not, emerge. In this special feature we draw on experiences from around the world to demonstrate and investigate the consequences of diverse capacities and capabilities in bringing science and governance together. We propose the concept of coproductive capacities as a useful new lens through which to examine these relations. Coproductive capacity is “the combination of scientific resources and governance capability that shapes the extent to which a society, at various levels, can operationalize relationships between...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Synthesis Palavras-chave: Capacity development; Coproduction; Environmental governance; Environmental policy; Knowledge; Scale; Science-policy interface; Sustainable development.
Ano: 2015
Imagem não selecionada

Imprime registro no formato completo
Catalyst: reimagining sustainability with and through fine art Ecology and Society
Connelly, Angela; Manchester Architecture Research Centre, The University of Manchester, Manchester, UK ; angela.connelly-2@manchester.ac.uk; Guy, Simon C; Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, Lancaster University, Lancaster, UK ; s.guy@lancaster.ac.uk; Wainwright, Dr. Edward; School of Architecture, Planning & Landscape, Newcastle University, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, UK ; edward.wainwright@ncl.ac.uk; Weileder, Wolfgang; Fine Art, School of Arts and Cultures, Newcastle University, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, UK ; wolfgang.weileder@ncl.ac.uk; Wilde, Marianne; Fine Art, School of Arts and Cultures, Newcastle University, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, UK ; marianne.wilde@ncl.ac.uk.
How might we begin to explore the concept of the “sustainable city” in a world often characterized as dynamic, fluid, and contested? Debates about the sustainable city are too often dominated by a technological discourse conducted among professional experts, but this technocratic framing is open to challenge. For some critics, sustainability is a meaningless notion, yet for others its semantic pliability opens up discursive spaces through which to explore interconnections across time, space, and scale. Thus, while enacting sustainability in policy and practice is an arduous task, we can productively ask how cultural imaginations might be stirred and shaken to make sustainability accessible to a wider public who might join the...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Coproduction; Interdisciplinarity; Practice-led research; Sustainability; Urban.
Ano: 2016
Imagem não selecionada

Imprime registro no formato completo
Coproducing flood risk management through citizen involvement: insights from cross-country comparison in Europe Ecology and Society
Mees, Hannelore; Research Group Environment and Society, University of Antwerp; hannelore.mees@uantwerpen.be; Alexander, Meghan; Flood Hazard Research Centre, Middlesex University ; m.c.alexander@mdx.ac.uk; Kaufmann, Maria; Institute for Management Research, Radboud University Nijmegen; m.kaufmann@fm.ru.nl; Bruzzone, Silvia; CITERES Research Centre, François Rabelais University of Tours; silvia.bruzzone@enpc.fr; Lewandowski, Jakub; Institute for Agricultural and Forest Environment, Polish Academy of Science; jakub.lewandowski22@gmail.com.
Across Europe, citizens are increasingly expected to participate in the implementation of flood risk management (FRM), by engaging in voluntary-based activities to enhance preparedness, implementing property-level measures, and so forth. Although citizen participation in FRM decision making is widely addressed in academic literature, citizens’ involvement in the delivery of FRM measures is comparatively understudied. Drawing from public administration literature, we adopted the notion of “coproduction” as an analytical framework for studying the interaction between citizens and public authorities, from the decision-making process through to the implementation of FRM in practice. We considered to what extent coproduction is...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Codelivery; Coproduction; Cross-country comparison; Flood risk governance; Flood risk responsibilities; Legitimacy; Public participation; Resilience.
Ano: 2016
Registros recuperados: 5
Primeira ... 1 ... Última
 

Empresa Brasileira de Pesquisa Agropecuária - Embrapa
Todos os direitos reservados, conforme Lei n° 9.610
Política de Privacidade
Área restrita

Embrapa
Parque Estação Biológica - PqEB s/n°
Brasília, DF - Brasil - CEP 70770-901
Fone: (61) 3448-4433 - Fax: (61) 3448-4890 / 3448-4891 SAC: https://www.embrapa.br/fale-conosco

Valid HTML 4.01 Transitional