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Registros recuperados: 27
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America's Diverse Family Farms 2007 Edition AgEcon
Hoppe, Robert A.; Banker, David E.; Korb, Penelope J.; O'Donoghue, Erik J.; MacDonald, James M..
American farms encompass a wide range of sizes, ownership structures, and business types, but most farms are still family farms. Family farms account for 98 percent of farms and 85 percent of production. Although most farms are small and own most of the farmland, production has shifted to very large farms. Farms with sales of $1 million or more make up less than 2 percent of all farms, but they account for 48 percent of farm product sales. Most of these million-dollar farms are family farms. Because small-farm households rely on off-farm work for most of their income, general economic policies, such as tax or economic development policy, can be as important to them as traditional farm policy.
Tipo: Report Palavras-chave: Family farms; Farm program payments; Farm production; Farm household income; Commodity payments; Direct payments; Government payments; Agricultural Resource Management Survey; Contracting; ERS; USDA; Agricultural and Food Policy; Farm Management.
Ano: 2007 URL: http://purl.umn.edu/59029
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America's Diverse Family Farms: 2010 Edition AgEcon
Hoppe, Robert A.; Banker, David E.; MacDonald, James M..
American farms vary widely in size and other characteristics, but farming is still an industry of family businesses. Ninety-eight percent of farms are family farms, and they account for 82 percent of farm production. Small family farms make up most of the U.S. farm count and hold the majority of farm assets, but they produce a modest share of U.S. farm output. In contrast, large-scale family farms and nonfamily farms—only 12 percent of all farms—account for 84 percent of farm production. Small farms are less profitable than large-scale farms, on average, and the households operating them tend to rely on off-farm income for their livelihood. Because small-farm households receive most of their income from off-farm work, general economic policies—such as tax...
Tipo: Report Palavras-chave: Family farms; Farm businesses; Farm financial performance; Farm-operator household income; Farm operators; Farm structure; Farm type; Government payments; Limited-resource farms; Small farms; ERS; USDA; Agribusiness; Agricultural Finance; Farm Management.
Ano: 2010 URL: http://purl.umn.edu/96653
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America's Diverse Family Farms: Assorted Sizes, Types, and Situations AgEcon
Hoppe, Robert A.; MacDonald, James M..
This report describes a farm typology developed by the Economic Research Service (ERS), which categorizes farms into more homogeneous groups than classifications based on sales volume alone, producing a more effective policy development tool. The typology is used to describe U.S. farm structure.
Tipo: Report Palavras-chave: Farm Management.
Ano: 2001 URL: http://purl.umn.edu/33767
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America's Diverse Family Farms: Structure and Finances AgEcon
Hoppe, Robert A.; MacDonald, James M.; Banker, David E..
American farms vary widely in size and other characteristics, but farming is still an industry of family businesses. Ninety-eight percent of farms are family farms, and they account for 86 percent of farm production. Very small farms are growing in number, and small family farms continue to own most farmland. But production is shifting toward very large family farms. Because small-farm households receive most of their income from off-farm work, general economic policies—such as tax policy or economic development policy—can be as important to them as traditional farm policy.
Tipo: Report Palavras-chave: Agricultural Resource Management Survey (ARMS); Family farms; Farm businesses; Farm financial performance; Farm-operator household income; Farm operators; Farm structure; Farm type; Multiple-operator farms; Multiple-generation farms; Small farms; ERS; Agribusiness.
Ano: 2006 URL: http://purl.umn.edu/59406
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AN ANALYSIS OF NONMETROPOLITAN GROWTH IN MINNESOTA AgEcon
Dorf, Ronald J.; Hoppe, Robert A..
Tipo: Working or Discussion Paper Palavras-chave: Community/Rural/Urban Development.
Ano: 1976 URL: http://purl.umn.edu/13492
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ANALYSIS OF ECONOMIC CHANGES IN REGION 6E 1960-1970 AgEcon
Hoppe, Robert A.; Dorf, Ronald J..
In this paper, socio-economic changes in one development region, Region 6E, are examined and compared with changes occurring in Minnesota from 1960 to 1970. Region 6E consists of Kandiyohi, McLeod, Meeker, and Renville Counties. In particular, changes in employment by occupations, and changes in income for the urban, rural nonfarm, and rural farm populations of Region 6E are examined.
Tipo: Working or Discussion Paper Palavras-chave: Community/Rural/Urban Development.
Ano: 1976 URL: http://purl.umn.edu/14106
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Changing Farm Structure and the Distribution of Farm Payments and Federal Crop Insurance AgEcon
White, T. Kirk; Hoppe, Robert A..
The distribution of commodity-related payments and Federal crop insurance indemnities to U.S. farmers has shifted to larger farms as more and more U.S. agricultural production is done on those farms. Since the operators of larger farms tend to have higher household incomes than other farm operators, commodity-related program payments and Federal crop insurance indemnities also have shifted to higher income households. By 2009, half of commodity-related program payments went to farms operated by households earning over $89,540, a quarter went to farms operated by households with incomes greater than $209,000 and 10 percent went to farms operated by households with incomes of at least $425,000. Current income eligibility caps and payment limits affect few...
Tipo: Technical Report Palavras-chave: Farm program payments; Federal crop insurance; Agricultural Resource Management Survey; Structural change; Income caps; Payment limits.; Agricultural and Food Policy; Agricultural Finance; Industrial Organization; Public Economics.
Ano: 2012 URL: http://purl.umn.edu/120309
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DECOUPLED PAYMENTS IN A CHANGING POLICY SETTING AgEcon
Ahearn, Mary Clare; Collender, Robert N.; Diao, Xinshen; Harrington, David H.; Hoppe, Robert A.; Korb, Penelope J.; Makki, Shiva S.; Morehart, Mitchell J.; Roberts, Michael J.; Roe, Terry L.; Somwaru, Agapi; Vandeveer, Monte; Westcott, Paul C.; Young, C. Edwin.
The studies in this report analyze the effects of decoupled payments in the Federal Agriculture Improvement and Reform (FAIR) Act on recipient households, and assess land, labor, risk management, and capital market conditions that can lead to links between decoupled payments and production choices. Each study contributes a different perspective to understanding the response of U.S. farm households and production to decoupled income transfers. Some use new microdata on farm households collected through USDA's Agricultural Resource Management Survey (ARMS), initiated in 1996, and its predecessor survey. These data are used to compare household and producer behavior and outcomes before and after the FAIR Act. Other studies use applied or conceptual models to...
Tipo: Report Palavras-chave: Agricultural and Food Policy.
Ano: 2004 URL: http://purl.umn.edu/33981
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Differences in Canadian and U.S. Farm Structure: What the Canadian Farm Typology Shows AgEcon
Hoppe, Robert A.; Niekamp, Deborah; Banker, David E.; Nakagawa, Ken.
Canadian and U.S. farms vary widely in size and other characteristics, ranging from very small retirement and residential farms to firms with sales in the millions. Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada (AAFC) and the United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA’s) Economic Research Service (ERS) have each developed a farm typology to classify farms into more homogeneous groups. These typologies provide useful insights into farm structure in each country. It is difficult, however, to use the typologies to compare farm structure in Canada and the United States, because the definitions within the two typologies differ. To make direct comparisons of farm structure in the two countries the Canadian typology was applied to the farms in both nations.
Tipo: Journal Article Palavras-chave: Crop Production/Industries; Farm Management.
Ano: 2004 URL: http://purl.umn.edu/45740
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ERS Farm Typology for a Diverse Agricultural Sector AgEcon
Hoppe, Robert A.; Perry, Janet E.; Banker, David E..
The Economic Research Service (ERS) developed a farm typology which categorizes farms into more homogeneous groups than do classifications based on sales volume alone, producing a more effective policy development tool. The typology is used to describe U.S. farms.
Tipo: Report Palavras-chave: Farm Management.
Ano: 2000 URL: http://purl.umn.edu/33657
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FARM OPERATIONS FACING DEVELOPMENT: RESULTS FROM THE CENSUS LONGITUDINAL FILE AgEcon
Hoppe, Robert A.; Korb, Penelope J..
This paper examines farms in areas undergoing development, using a longitudinal file constructed by linking several agricultural censuses. Individual farms are followed over the 1982-97 period. Survival, exit, and entrance rates are presented for three types of farms: recreational, adaptive, and traditional. The three types of farms are located where one would expect. Traditional farms are concentrated in nonmetropolitan (nonmetro) counties, while adaptive farms are concentrated in metro core counties. Recreational farms are least common in nonmetro nonadjacent areas, where off-farm opportunities are fewest. The concentration of adaptive farms in metro core counties does not appear to be the result of these farms simply surviving an urban...
Tipo: Conference Paper or Presentation Palavras-chave: Urban development; Urbanization; Specialty agriculture; High-value agriculture; Farming; Farm structure; Farm Management.
Ano: 2001 URL: http://purl.umn.edu/20771
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Growing Farm Size and the Distribution of Farm Payments AgEcon
MacDonald, James M.; Hoppe, Robert A.; Banker, David E..
Crop production is shifting to much larger farms. Since government commodity payments reflect production volumes for program commodities, payments are also shifting to larger farms. In turn, the operators of very large farms have substantially higher household incomes than other farm households, and as a result government commodity payments are also shifting to much higher-income households. Since the changes in farm structure appear to be ongoing, commodity payments will likely, under current policies, continue to shift to higher income households. This brief uses 2003 Agricultural Resource Management Survey (ARMS) data to detail the shifts.
Tipo: Report Palavras-chave: Farm structure; Commodity programs; Farm payments; Farm household income; Farm income; Farm program payments; ERS; USDA; Agricultural and Food Policy; Industrial Organization.
Ano: 2006 URL: http://purl.umn.edu/34089
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Million-Dollar Farms Dominate Production of Some Commodities AgEcon
Hoppe, Robert A..
Tipo: Article Palavras-chave: Agribusiness.
Ano: 2012 URL: http://purl.umn.edu/124080
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Million-Dollar Farms in the New Century AgEcon
Hoppe, Robert A.; Korb, Penelope J.; Banker, David E..
Million-dollar farms—those with annual sales of at least $1 million—accounted for about half of U.S. farm sales in 2002, up from a fourth in 1982 (with sales measured in constant 2002 dollars). By 2006, million-dollar farms, accounting for 2 percent of all U.S. farms, dominated U.S. production of high-value crops, milk, hogs, poultry, and beef. The shift to million-dollar farms is likely to continue because they tend to be more profitable than smaller farms, giving them a competitive advantage. Most million-dollar farms (84 percent) are family farms, that is, the farm operator and relatives of the operator own the business. The million-dollar farms organized as nonfamily corporations tend to have no more than 10 stockholders.
Tipo: Report Palavras-chave: Contracting; Family farms; Farm businesses; Farm financial performance; Farm-operator household income; Farm operators; Farm structure; Farm type; Million-dollar farms; Farm Management.
Ano: 2008 URL: http://purl.umn.edu/58623
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RESPONSE: IMPACT ON KNOWLEDGE OF FARM OPERATORS AgEcon
Hoppe, Robert A..
Tipo: Conference Paper or Presentation Palavras-chave: Farm Management.
Ano: 2004 URL: http://purl.umn.edu/32987
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Small Farms: Characteristics and Production (PowerPoint) AgEcon
MacDonald, James M.; Hoppe, Robert A..
Tipo: Conference Paper or Presentation Palavras-chave: Farm Management.
Ano: 2010 URL: http://purl.umn.edu/90760
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Small Farms in the United States: Persistence Under Pressure AgEcon
Hoppe, Robert A.; MacDonald, James M.; Korb, Penelope J..
Ninety-one percent of U.S. farms are classified as small—gross cash farm income (GCFI) of less than $250,000. About 60 percent of these small farms are very small, generating GCFI of less than $10,000. These very small noncommercial farms, in some respects, exist independently of the farm economy because their operators rely heavily on off-farm income. The remaining small farms—small commercial farms—account for most small-farm production. Overall farm production, however, continues to shift to larger operations, while the number of small commercial farms and their share of sales maintain a long-term decline. The shift to larger farms will continue to be gradual, because some small commercial farms are profitable and others are willing to accept losses.
Tipo: Report Palavras-chave: Family farms; Farm businesses; Farm financial performance; Farm-operator household income; Farm operators; Farm structure; Noncommercial farms; Small farms; Small commercial farms; Agricultural and Food Policy; Farm Management.
Ano: 2010 URL: http://purl.umn.edu/58300
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Structural and Financial Characteristics of U.S. Farms, 1995: 20th Annual Family Farm Report to Congress AgEcon
Sommer, Judith E.; Hoppe, Robert A.; Green, Robert C.; Korb, Penelope J..
National average statistics related to farm production mask the diversity in the Nation's 2 million farms and the people who operate them. Farms in the United States differ not only by size (sales and acres) and type of production, but also by organizational characteristics (land ownership, legal organization, contracting arrangements) and financial characteristics (debt, assets, income, expenditures). Farm operators and their households vary with respect to demographic characteristics (occupation, age, education), financial characteristics (dependence on farm income, operator/spouse labor allocation), and management characteristics (information sources, business goals).
Tipo: Report Palavras-chave: Farm structure; Farm income; Financial performance; Farm management; Farm business; Government payments; Farm loans; Computer use; Minority farmers; Female farm operators; Farm operator household; Family farm; Small farm; Agricultural Finance; Farm Management.
Ano: 1998 URL: http://purl.umn.edu/33620
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STRUCTURAL CHANGE IN AN ERA OF INCREASED OPENNESS: A BACKGROUND PAPER ON THE STRUCTURE OF U.S. AGRICULTURE AgEcon
Zahniser, Steven; Hoppe, Robert A.; Johnson, James D.; Banker, David E..
Tipo: Conference Paper or Presentation Palavras-chave: Agribusiness.
Ano: 2002 URL: http://purl.umn.edu/16872
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Structure and Finances of U.S. Farms: 2005 Family Farm Report AgEcon
Hoppe, Robert A.; Banker, David E..
Most farms in the United States—98 percent in 2003—are family farms. They are organized as proprietorships, partnerships, or family corporations. Even the largest farms tend to be family farms, although they are more likely to have more than one operator. Very large family farms and nonfamily farms account for a small share of farms but a large—and growing—share of farm sales. Small family farms account for most of the farms in the United States but produce a modest share of farm output. Median income for farm households is 10 percent greater than the median for all U.S. households, and small-farm households receive substantial off-farm income. Many farm households have a large net worth, reflecting the land-intensive nature of farming.
Tipo: Report Palavras-chave: Agricultural Resource Management Survey (ARMS); Family farms; Farm businesses; Farm financial performance; Farm-operator household income; Farm operators; Farm structure; Farm type; Multiple-operator farms; Multiple-generation farms; Small farms; Contracting; Farm Management.
Ano: 2006 URL: http://purl.umn.edu/59404
Registros recuperados: 27
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