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Registros recuperados: 10
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Abatement Technology and the Environment-Growth Nexus with Education AgEcon
Pautrel, Xavier.
This article challenges the conventional result that a tighter environmental tax has no long-run effect on human capital accumulation in the presence of pollution arising from final output production. It demonstrates that the technology used in the abatement sector determines the existence and the direction of the growth-effect. A tighter environmental tax rises (respectively reduces) human capital accumulation in the presence of pollution arising from final production, if the abatement sector is relatively more intensive in human (resp. physical) capital than final sector. That result always holds for finite lifetime but for infinite lifetime it only holds when labor supply is endogenous. The transitional impact of a tighter environmental policy is also...
Tipo: Working or Discussion Paper Palavras-chave: Growth; Environment; Overlapping Generations; Human Capital; Abatement; Research and Development/Tech Change/Emerging Technologies; Q5; Q58.
Ano: 2011 URL: http://purl.umn.edu/101379
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An Analysis of the Role of Tile-Drained Farmland Under Alternative Nitrogen Abatement Policies AgEcon
Petrolia, Daniel R.; Gowda, Prasanna H..
Agricultural nitrogen is a major contributor to Gulf of Mexico hypoxia, and research has shown that agricultural subsurface tile drainage is a major carrier of nitrogen from croplands to streams and rivers. This study compares the results of abating nitrogen under a retired-land minimization policy with those of a new revenue-maximizing policy, paying particular attention to the role of tile-drained land. Findings reveal the retirement-minimizing policy resulted in more tile-drained land being retired and less being fertilizer-managed than was optimal under the net-return maximizing policy. Also, it led to a greater economic burden being shouldered by tile-drained land. Under both cases, tile drainage dominated the abatement process.
Tipo: Journal Article Palavras-chave: Abatement; ADAPT; Drainage; Hypoxia; Nitrogen; Crop Production/Industries; Land Economics/Use.
Ano: 2006 URL: http://purl.umn.edu/8621
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Dynamic regulation of nonpoint source pollution when the number of emitters is large AgEcon
Tsur, Yacov; de Gorter, Harry.
When a nonpoint source pollution process involves many polluters, each taking his own contribution to aggregate pollution to be negligible, ambient-based policies become ineffective due to lack of strategic interactions between dischargers. We offer a regulation mechanism for this case. The mechanism consists of inter-period and intra-period components. The first exploits ambient (aggregate) information to derive the optimal pollution and aggregate emission processes and the ensuing social price of emission. The intra-period mechanism takes as given the social price of emission and implements the optimal output-abatement-emission allocation across the heterogenous, privately informed firms in each time period. The mechanism gives rise to the full...
Tipo: Article Palavras-chave: Nonpoint source pollution; Abatement; Stock externality; Dynamic regulation; Markov decision process; Asymmetric information; Crop Production/Industries; C61; D82; H23; L51; Q58.
Ano: 2012 URL: http://purl.umn.edu/122124
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Environmental Policy, Education and Growth with Finite Lifetime: the Role of Abatement Technology AgEcon
Pautrel, Xavier.
This note shows that the assumptions about the abatement technology modify the impact of the environmental taxation (both the size and the “direction”) on the long-run growth driven by human capital accumulation à la Lucas (1988), when the source of pollution is private consumption and lifetime is finite. When the human capital’s share in the abatement services production is higher (respectively lower) than in the final output production, a higher environmental tax reduces (resp. increases) the allocation of human capital in production sectors (abatement service and final output) and boostes (resp. decreases) the BGP rate of growth. When abatement services are produced with the final output, the environmental taxation does not influence growth.
Tipo: Working or Discussion Paper Palavras-chave: Growth; Environment; Overlapping Generations; Human capital; Finite Lifetime; Abatement; Environmental Economics and Policy; Q5.
Ano: 2010 URL: http://purl.umn.edu/91003
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Fiddling while carbon burns: why climate policy needs emission pervasive pricing as well as technology promotion AgEcon
Pezzey, John C.V.; Jotzo, Frank; Quiggin, John C..
Effective climate policy requires global emissions of greenhouse gases to be cut substantially, which in energy sectors can be achieved by lower emissions supply technologies, greater energy use efficiency, and substitution in demand. For policy to be efficient requires fairly uniform, pervasive emission pricing from taxes, permit trading, or hybrid combinations of the two, as well as significant government support for low-emission technologies. We compare the kind of technology-focused climate policies currently adopted by Australia and the USA, the ‘'Asia-Pacific Partnership on Clean Development and Climate'’ (AP6), against this ideal policy yardstick. We find they omit the need for emission pricing to achieve abatement effectively and efficiently; they...
Tipo: Conference Paper or Presentation Palavras-chave: Greenhouse gas emissions; Abatement; Emission taxes; Emissions trading; Technology policy; Innovation; Asia-Pacific Partnership; AP6; Environmental Economics and Policy.
Ano: 2007 URL: http://purl.umn.edu/10395
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Land-Use Change and Carbon Sinks: Econometric Estimation of the Carbon Sequestration Supply Function AgEcon
Lubowski, Ruben N.; Plantinga, Andrew J.; Stavins, Robert N..
When and if the United States chooses to implement a greenhouse gas reduction program, it will be necessary to decide whether carbon sequestration policies - such as those that promote forestation and discourage deforestation - should be part of the domestic portfolio of compliance activities. We investigate the cost of forest-based carbon sequestration. In contrast with previous approaches, we econometrically examine micro-data on revealed landowner preferences, modeling six major private land uses in a comprehensive analysis of the contiguous United States. The econometric estimates are used to simulate landowner responses to sequestration policies. Key commodity prices are treated as endogenous and a carbon sink model is used to predict changes in...
Tipo: Working or Discussion Paper Palavras-chave: Abatement; Carbon; Climate change; Costs; Forestry; Greenhouse gases; Land use; Land-use change; Sequestration; Land Economics/Use; Q540; Q230; Q240; Q150.
Ano: 2005 URL: http://purl.umn.edu/10561
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Low Emission Farming Systems: A whole-farm analysis of the potential impacts of greenhouse policy AgEcon
Kingwell, Ross S.; Metcalf, Tess.
The Australian government is introducing a Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme in 2010, as part of its climate change policy. After 2015 agriculture may be covered by this scheme. This paper examines how different broadacre farming systems may be affected by the policy settings of this scheme. Using the bio-economic farming systems model MIDAS (Model of an Integrated Dryland Agricultural System) the impacts of the Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme on the profitability of different broadacre farming systems in the southwest of Australia are investigated. Results show a range of profit and enterprise impacts across the various farm types. In a scenario where agriculture is not covered by the scheme, reductions in profit range from 7 to 12 percent, attributable...
Tipo: Conference Paper or Presentation Palavras-chave: Agriculture; Greenhouse gases; Economic modelling; Abatement.
Ano: 2009 URL: http://purl.umn.edu/48162
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On the regulation of unobserved emissions AgEcon
Tsur, Yacov; de Gorter, Harry.
Regulation of nonpoint source pollution often relies in one way or another on policy instruments based on ambient indicators. For well-known reasons, enforcement of ambient-based policies is, at best, limited. If no individual choices or actions are observed, than ambient-based regulation might be the only feasible approach. Often, some relevant individual indicators, such as output or certain inputs, are observable. For such cases, we offer a regulation mechanism that does away with ambient indicators. The mechanism implements the optimal output-abatement-emission allocation and gives rise to the full information outcome when the social cost of transfers is nil. Special attention is given to the regulation of (unobserved) abatement.
Tipo: Working or Discussion Paper Palavras-chave: Nonpoint source pollution; Abatement; Asymmetric information; Regulation mechanism; Implementation.; Environmental Economics and Policy.
Ano: 2011 URL: http://purl.umn.edu/116228
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The challenges of finding efficient policy measures to reduce Australia’s agricultural Greenhouse gas emissions AgEcon
King, Helen.
A comprehensive emissions trading scheme (ETS) is Australia’s principal climate change policy instrument. There are undoubtedly benefits of full ETS coverage. However, if emissions that cannot be affordably, reasonably and accurately measured are included, these must be balanced against potential costs. This report explores why agriculture is different from other sectors. Agriculture’s diffuse and diverse emissions are inherently difficult to measure. They also fluctuate in response to environmental factors such as climate and biophysical characteristics. It is problematic to include the agriculture sector in the ETS, at reasonable cost and with incentives for behaviour change at the emission source. This is because of the climate and biophysical...
Tipo: Report Palavras-chave: Agriculture; Greenhouse; Abatement; Emissions trading; Agricultural and Food Policy; Environmental Economics and Policy.
Ano: 2008 URL: http://purl.umn.edu/94809
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The Effects of Penalty Design on Market Performance: Experimental Evidence from an Emissions Trading Scheme with Auctioned Permits AgEcon
Restiani, Phillia; Betz, Regina.
This paper investigates the behavioural implications of penalty designs on market performance using an experimental method. Three penalty types and two penalty levels are enforced in a laboratory permit market with auctioning, including the Australian Carbon Pollution Reduction Scheme proposed design of tying the penalty rate to the auction price. Compliance strategies are limited to undertaking irreversible abatement investment decisions or buying permits. We aim to assess how penalty design under the presence of subjects‟ risk preferences might affect compliance incentives, permit price discovery, and efficiency. In contrast to theory, we find that penalty levels serve as a focal point that indicates compliance costs and affects compliance strategies....
Tipo: Report Palavras-chave: Emissions trading; Penalty design; Experiment; Auction; Irreversible investment; Abatement; Compliance; Environmental Economics and Policy; Resource /Energy Economics and Policy.
Ano: 2010 URL: http://purl.umn.edu/107586
Registros recuperados: 10
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