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Registros recuperados: 11
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A Case for Developing Place-Based Fire Management Strategies from Traditional Ecological Knowledge Ecology and Society
Ray, Lily A; Department of Geography, Clark University; Resilience and Adaptation Program, University of Alaska, Fairbanks ; lray@kawerak.org; Kolden, Crystal A; Department of Geography, University of Idaho; ckolden@uidaho.edu; Chapin III, F. Stuart; Institute of Arctic Biology, University of Alaska, Fairbanks ; terry.chapin@alaska.edu.
Sustainability science promotes place-based resource management because natural processes vary among ecosystems. When local science is limited, land managers may be forced to generalize from other ecosystems that function differently. One proposed solution is to draw upon the traditional ecological knowledge that indigenous groups have accumulated through resource use. Integrating traditional ecological knowledge with conventional resource management is difficult, especially when the two offer competing explanations of local environments. Although resource managers may discount traditional ecological knowledge that contradicts conventional resource management, we investigate the possibility that these disagreements can arise when nonlocal resource...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Alaska; Climate change; Indigenous knowledge; Traditional ecological knowledge; Wildfire.
Ano: 2012
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Annotated checklist of the moths and butterflies (Lepidoptera) of Canada and Alaska Naturalis
Pohl, G.R.; Landry, J.-F.; Schmidt, B.C.; Lafontaine, J.D.; Troubridge, J.T.; Macaulay, A.D.; Nieukerken, E.J. van; DeWaard, J.R.; Dombroskie, J.J.; Klymko, J.; Nazari, V.; Stead , K..
Tipo: Book (monograph) Palavras-chave: Moths; Lepidoptera; Canada; Alaska.
Ano: 2018 URL: http://www.repository.naturalis.nl/record/648850
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Applications of resilience theory in management of a moose–hunter system in Alaska Ecology and Society
Brown, Casey L; Biology and Wildlife Department, University of Alaska Fairbanks; Resilience and Adaptation Program, University of Alaska Fairbanks; clbrown12@alaska.edu; Kellie, Kalin A; Alaska Department of Fish and Game, Fairbanks;; Brinkman, Todd J; Biology and Wildlife Department, University of Alaska Fairbanks; Resilience and Adaptation Program, University of Alaska Fairbanks; tjbrinkman@alaska.edu; Kielland, Knut; Biology and Wildlife Department, University of Alaska Fairbanks; Resilience and Adaptation Program, University of Alaska Fairbanks;.
We investigated wildfire-related effects on a slow ecological variable, i.e., forage production, and fast social-ecological variables, i.e., seasonal harvest rates, hunter access, and forage offtake, in a moose–hunter system in interior Alaska. In a 1994 burn, average forage production increased slightly (5%) between 2007 and 2013; however, the proportional removal across all sites declined significantly (10%). This suggests that moose are not utilizing the burn as much as they have in the past and that, as the burn has aged, the apparent habitat quality has declined. Areas with a greater proportion of accessible burned area supported both high numbers of hunters and harvested moose. Our results suggest that evaluating ecological variables in...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Alaska; Moose; Resilience; Slow and fast variables; Wildlife management.
Ano: 2015
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Changing times, changing stories: generational differences in climate change perspectives from four remote indigenous communities in Subarctic Alaska Ecology and Society
Herman-Mercer, Nicole M; National Research Program, U.S. Geological Survey; nhmercer@usgs.gov; Matkin, Elli; University of Montana; elli.marie@gmail.com; Laituri, Melinda J; Ecosystem Science and Sustainability, Colorado State University; Geospatial Centroid, Colorado State University; melinda.laituri@colostate.edu; Toohey, Ryan C; Alaska Science Center, U.S. Geological Survey; Alaska Climate Science Center; rtoohey@usgs.gov; Massey, Maggie; Science Department, Yukon River Inter-Tribal Watershed Council; maggie.cm.massey@gmail.com; Elder, Kelly; Rocky Mountain Research Station, U.S. Forest Service; kelder@fs.fed.us; Schuster, Paul F.; National Research Program, U.S. Geological Survey; pschuste@usgs.gov; Mutter, Edda A.; Science Department, Yukon River Inter-Tribal Watershed Council; emutter@yritwc.org.
Indigenous Arctic and Subarctic communities currently are facing a myriad of social and environmental changes. In response to these changes, studies concerning indigenous knowledge (IK) and climate change vulnerability, resiliency, and adaptation have increased dramatically in recent years. Risks to lives and livelihoods are often the focus of adaptation research; however, the cultural dimensions of climate change are equally important because cultural dimensions inform perceptions of risk. Furthermore, many Arctic and Subarctic IK climate change studies document observations of change and knowledge of the elders and older generations in a community, but few include the perspectives of the younger population. These observations by elders and older...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Alaska; Climate change; Indigenous knowledge; Observation; Perception; Yukon River Basin.
Ano: 2016
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Educating for resilience in the North: building a toolbox for teachers Ecology and Society
Spellman, Katie V.; Resilience and Adaptation Program, University of Alaska Fairbanks; katie.spellman@alaska.edu.
Communities at far northern latitudes must respond rapidly to the many complex problems that are arising from changing climate. An emerging body of theoretical and empirical work has explored the role that education plays in enhancing the resilience and adaptability of social-ecological systems. To foster effective, local, and timely responses of high-latitude communities to climate-driven social-ecological change, educators need access to successful and efficient teaching tools to foster resilience-promoting feedbacks. The potential for existing teaching practices to address this need, however, must be investigated and communicated to teachers. Here, I review the education and sustainability science literature for attributes of resilience to which formal...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Synthesis Palavras-chave: Alaska; Citizen science; Human capital; Metacognition; Pedagogy; Scenarios thinking; Sense of place; Social capital; Social-ecological resilience; Systems thinking.
Ano: 2015
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Generalizable principles for ecosystem stewardship-based management of social-ecological systems: lessons learned from Alaska Ecology and Society
Hansen, Winslow D.; Department of Zoology, University of Wisconsin-Madison; whansen3@wisc.edu.
Human pressure could compromise the provision of ecosystem services if we do not implement strategies such as ecosystem stewardship to foster sustainable trajectories. Barriers to managing systems based on ecosystem stewardship principles are pervasive, including institutional constraints and uncertain system dynamics. However, solutions to help managers overcome these barriers are less common. How can we better integrate ecosystem stewardship into natural resource management practices? I draw on examples from the literature and two broadly applicable case studies from Alaska to suggest some generalizable principles that can help managers redirect how people use and view ecosystems. These include (1) accounting for both people and ecosystems in management...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Alaska; Bark beetle outbreak; Ecosystem disservices; Ecosystem services; Ecosystem stewardship based management strategies; Kenai Peninsula; King salmon; Regime shift; Resilience; Social-ecological systems; Transformation; Wildfire; Yukon River drainage.
Ano: 2014
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Growth and Collapse of a Resource System: an Adaptive Cycle of Change in Public Lands Governance and Forest Management in Alaska Ecology and Society
Beier, Colin M.; University of Alaska-Fairbanks; SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry; cbeier@esf.edu; Lovecraft, Amy Lauren; University of Alaska-Fairbanks; ffall@uaf.edu; Chapin, III, F. Stuart; University of Alaska-Fairbanks; terry.chapin@uaf.edu.
Large-scale government efforts to develop resources for societal benefit have often experienced cycles of growth and decline that leave behind difficult social and ecological legacies. To understand the origins and outcomes of these failures of resource governance, scholars have applied the framework of the adaptive cycle. In this study, we used the adaptive cycle as a diagnostic approach to trace the drivers and dynamics of forest governance surrounding a boom–bust sequence of industrial forest management in one of the largest-scale resource systems in U.S. history: the Tongass National Forest in southeastern Alaska. Our application of the adaptive cycle combined a historical narrative tracing dynamics in political, institutional, and economic...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Synthesis Palavras-chave: Adaptive cycle; Alaska; Forest management; Resource governance; Rigidity traps; U.S. National Forests.
Ano: 2009
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Impact of fuel costs on high-latitude subsistence activities Ecology and Society
Brinkman, Todd; Institute of Arctic Biology, University of Alaska Fairbanks; tjbrinkman@alaska.edu; Kelly, James; Council of Athabascan Tribal Governments; jkelly@catg.org; Vandyke, Michelle; Council of Athabascan Tribal Governments; mvandyke@catg.org; Firmin, Andrew; Council of Athabascan Tribal Governments;; Springsteen, Anna; Scenarios Network for Alaska and Arctic Planning, University of Alaska Fairbanks; alspringsteen@alaska.edu.
Most rural residents in Arctic communities rely on motorized transportation to hunt, fish, trap, and gather subsistence resources. Although these technologies have created advantages, one significant disadvantage is that peoples’ ability to meet their nutritional and cultural needs now depends on consistent opportunities for wage employment and availability of affordable fuel. Recent qualitative research suggested that rising fuel prices have disrupted subsistence lifestyles in the Arctic. Our objectives were to collaborate with subsistence users in rural Alaskan communities to quantify how rising fuel costs have impacted subsistence activities and explore ways local residents may adapt to the trajectory of change. We conducted interviews with...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Adaptation; Alaska; Gasoline; Interviews; Social resilience; Subsistence.
Ano: 2014
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Resilience strategies in the face of short- and long-term change: out-migration and fisheries regulation in Alaskan fishing communities Ecology and Society
Himes-Cornell, Amber; National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration; amber.himes@noaa.gov; Hoelting, Kristin; Colorado State University; kristin.hoelting@colostate.edu.
Historically, communities persisted in remote, isolated areas of Alaska in large part because of the abundance of marine and terrestrial resources, as well as the ability of local people to opportunistically access those resources as they became available. Species switching and the ability to shift effort away from fisheries during poor years allowed local residents to diversify their livelihoods in the face of uncertainties and ecological change. The advent of modern fisheries management, which views Alaskan fisheries as the property of all citizens of the United States, has fundamentally altered the relationship of place-based communities to fishery resources. Local access to fisheries has been particularly affected by the development of transferable...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Alaska; Communities; Fisheries privatization; Out-migration; Resilience; Well-being.
Ano: 2015
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The Fate of Coho Salmon Nomads: The Story of an Estuarine-Rearing Strategy Promoting Resilience Ecology and Society
Koski, K V.; The Nature Conservancy Alaska Field Office, Juneau, Alaska, USA; kkoski@tnc.org.
The downstream movement of coho salmon nomads (age 0), conventionally considered surplus fry, has been an accepted characteristic of juvenile coho salmon for the past 40 to 50 yr. The fate of these nomads, however, was not known and they were assumed to perish in the ocean. Several studies and observations have recently provided new insights into the fate of nomads and the role of the stream-estuary ecotone and estuary in developing this life history strategy that promotes coho resilience. Chinook and sockeye salmon have developed the ocean-type life-history strategy to exploit the higher productivity of the estuarine environment and migrate to the ocean at age 0. Nomad coho can acclimate to brackish water, and survive and grow well in the stream-estuary...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Insight Palavras-chave: Age 0; Alaska; Coho salmon; Estuaries; Fry; Life history strategy; Nomads; Resilience; Restoration; Smolts; Stream-estuary ecotone..
Ano: 2009
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The Significance of Context in Community-Based Research: Understanding Discussions about Wildfire in Huslia, Alaska Ecology and Society
Huntington, Henry P; Huntington Consulting; hph@alaska.net; Trainor, Sarah F; University of Alaska Fairbanks; fnsft@uaf.edu; Natcher, David C; Department of Anthropology, Memorial University of Newfoundland; dnatcher@mun.ca; Huntington, Orville H; Alaska Native Science Commission; o.huntington@att.net; DeWilde, La'ona; Yukon River Intertribal Watershed Council;; Chapin III, F. Stuart; University of Alaska Fairbanks; terry.chapin@uaf.edu.
Community workshops are widely used tools for collaborative research on social-ecological resilience in indigenous communities. Although results have been reported in many publications, few have reflected explicitly on the workshop itself, and specifically on understanding what is said during a workshop. Drawing on experience from workshops held in Huslia, Alaska in 2004 on wildfire and climate change, we discuss the importance of considering cultural, political, and epistemological context when analyzing statements made by indigenous people in community workshops. We provide examples of statements whose meaning and intent were, and may remain, unclear, with descriptions of our attempts to understand what was being said by placing the statements in a...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Insight Palavras-chave: Alaska; Cross-cultural communication; Indigenous knowledge; Wildfire; Workshops..
Ano: 2006
Registros recuperados: 11
Primeira ... 1 ... Última
 

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