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Registros recuperados: 22
Primeira ... 12 ... Última
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After the Cap: Risk Assessment, Citizen Science and Disaster Recovery Ecology and Society
McCormick, Sabrina; George Washington University; sabmc@gwu.edu.
I used the 2010 Deepwater Horizon oil spill to examine how crowdsourcing is used as a new form of citizen science that provides real time assessments of health-related exposures. Assessing risks of an oil spill, or disasters more generally, is a challenge complicated by the situated nature of knowledge-generation that results in differential perceptions and responses. These processes are critical in the case of the British Petroleum spill in the Gulf Coast since the identification of risks promises to have ramifications for multiple social actors, as well as the health status and long-term resilience of communities in the area. Qualitative interviews, ethnographic observations, and video data were collected with local social movement organizations,...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed article Palavras-chave: Deepwater Horizon; Citizen science; Health; Oil spill.
Ano: 2012
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Balancing state and volunteer investment in biodiversity monitoring for the implementation of CBD indicators: A French example ArchiMer
Levrel, Harold; Fontaine, B.; Henry, Pierre-yves; Jiguet, Frederic; Julliard, Romain; Kerbiriou, Christian; Couvet, Denis.
According to the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD), states have to provide indicators in order to assess the performance of their initiatives for halting the loss of biodiversity. Sixteen headline indicators have been identified for monitoring the CBD targets. Of these indicators only one, "Trends in the abundance and distribution of selected species," is a direct headline indicator of "non-exploited" biodiversity. In France, the implementation of this indicator is completely dependent on data collected by volunteers. Since this investment of volunteer time is equivalent to savings in administrative costs, we attempt in this paper to assign it a monetary value. This enables us to estimate how much the French administration saves thanks to volunteer...
Tipo: Text Palavras-chave: Biodiversity monitoring; CBD indicators; Citizen science; Replacement cost.
Ano: 2010 URL: http://archimer.ifremer.fr/doc/00006/11694/8614.pdf
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Citizen science and natural resource governance: program design for vernal pool policy innovation Ecology and Society
McGreavy, Bridie; Department of Communication and Journalism, Senator George J. Mitchell Center for Sustainability Solutions, University of Maine ; bridie.mcgreavy@maine.edu; Calhoun, Aram J. K.; Department of Wildlife, Fisheries, and Conservation Biology, University of Maine ; calhoun@maine.edu; Jansujwicz, Jessica; Senator George J. Mitchell Center for Sustainability Solutions, University of Maine ; jessica.jansujwicz@maine.edu; Levesque, Vanessa; Department of Sustainability, University of New Hampshire ; vanessa.levesque@unh.edu.
Effective natural resource policy depends on knowing what is needed to sustain a resource and building the capacity to identify, develop, and implement flexible policies. This retrospective case study applies resilience concepts to a 16-year citizen science program and vernal pool regulatory development process in Maine, USA. We describe how citizen science improved adaptive capacities for innovative and effective policies to regulate vernal pools. We identified two core program elements that allowed people to act within narrow windows of opportunity for policy transformation, including (1) the simultaneous generation of useful, credible scientific knowledge and construction of networks among diverse institutions, and (2) the formation of diverse...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Adaptive governance; Citizen science; Leadership; Natural resource policy; Vernal pools.
Ano: 2016
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Citizen Science as a Tool for Conservation in Residential Ecosystems Ecology and Society
Cooper, Caren B; Cornell Lab of Ornithology; cbc25@cornell.edu; Dickinson, Janis; Cornell Lab of Ornithology;; Phillips, Tina; Cornell Lab of Ornithology;; Bonney, Rick; Cornell Lab of Ornithology;.
Human activities, such as mining, forestry, and agriculture, strongly influence processes in natural systems. Because conservation has focused on managing and protecting wildlands, research has focused on understanding the indirect influence of these human activities on wildlands. Although a conservation focus on wildlands is critically important, the concept of residential area as an ecosystem is relatively new, and little is known about the potential of such areas to contribute to the conservation of biodiversity. As urban sprawl increases, it becomes urgent to construct a method to research and improve the impacts of management strategies for residential landscapes. If the cumulative activities of individual property owners could help conserve...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Insight Palavras-chave: Citizen science; Cumulative effects; Residential landscapes; Urban ecology.
Ano: 2007
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Citizen, Science, Highways, and Wildlife: Using a Web-based GIS to Engage Citizens in Collecting Wildlife Information Ecology and Society
Lee, Tracy; University of Calgary; tracy@rockies.ca; Quinn, Michael S; University of Calgary; quinn@ucalgary.ca; Duke, Danah; University of Calgary; danah@rockies.ca.
Road Watch in the Pass is a citizen-science project that engages local citizens in reporting wildlife observations along a 44-km stretch of Highway 3 through Crowsnest Pass in southwestern Alberta, Canada. The numbers of wildlife vehicle collisions and a recent proposal to expand the highway have raised concerns from both human safety and wildlife conservation perspectives. Through the use of a web-based GIS, interested citizens can contribute information that will be instrumental in making final decisions concerning measures to mitigate the effects of highway expansion. Currently, 58 people have contributed over 713 observations to Road Watch. We performed a preliminary comparison of 11 months of Road Watch observations and wildlife mortality data for...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Citizen science; Crowsnest Pass; Highways; Road ecology; Transportation; Web-based GIS; Wildlife-vehicle collisions.
Ano: 2006
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Citizen science participation in research in the environmental sciences: key factors related to projects’ success and longevity Anais da ABC (AABC)
CUNHA,DAVI G.F.; MARQUES,JONATAS F.; RESENDE,JULIANA C. DE; FALCO,PATRÍCIA B. DE; SOUZA,CHRISLAINE M. DE; LOISELLE,STEVEN A..
ABSTRACT The potential impacts of citizen science initiatives are increasing across the globe, albeit in an imbalanced manner. In general, there is a strong element of trial and error in most projects, and the comparison of best practices and project structure between different initiatives remains difficult. In Brazil, the participation of volunteers in environmental research is limited. Identifying the factors related to citizen science projects’ success and longevity within a global perspective can contribute for consolidating such practices in the country. In this study, we explore past and present projects, including a case study in Brazil, to identify the spatial and temporal trends of citizen science programs as well as their best practices and...
Tipo: Info:eu-repo/semantics/article Palavras-chave: Citizen science; Community-based monitoring; Environmental management; Public participation; Volunteer data collection.
Ano: 2017 URL: http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0001-37652017000502229
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COASTAL MAPPING AND KITESURFING ArchiMer
Barde, J.; Bonhommeau, Sylvain; Chassot, E.; Motah, B..
ollecting data on aquatic biodiversity is very challenging because of the difficulty to access underwater ecosystems. Over the years, field surveys have become easier and cheaper with the development of low cost electronics. Commercial and recreational vessels, including sailboats, can now substantially complement expensive scientific surveys and arrays of observation buoys deployed across the world oceans (Pesant et al., 2015, Karsenti et al., 2011). Meanwhile, a large variety of marine animals such as birds, mammals, and fish have become data collection platforms for both biological and environmental parameters through the advent of archival tags. It becomes obvious that data collection in coastal and high seas will become more popular and that citizen...
Tipo: Text Palavras-chave: Citizen science; Ocean and coastal observing systems; Surfing; Action cameras; Coral reef mapping; Photogrammetry; Deep learning; R.
Ano: 2018 URL: http://archimer.ifremer.fr/doc/00450/56164/57712.pdf
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Comments on "Genetically Modified Crops: Risks and Promise" by Gordon Conway Ecology and Society
Gadgil, Madhav; Indian Institute of Science; madhav@ces.iisc.ernet.in.
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Citizen science; Exclusion; Global development; Green revolution; New culture; Plant biotechnology; Poverty; Public participation.
Ano: 2000
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Educating for resilience in the North: building a toolbox for teachers Ecology and Society
Spellman, Katie V.; Resilience and Adaptation Program, University of Alaska Fairbanks; katie.spellman@alaska.edu.
Communities at far northern latitudes must respond rapidly to the many complex problems that are arising from changing climate. An emerging body of theoretical and empirical work has explored the role that education plays in enhancing the resilience and adaptability of social-ecological systems. To foster effective, local, and timely responses of high-latitude communities to climate-driven social-ecological change, educators need access to successful and efficient teaching tools to foster resilience-promoting feedbacks. The potential for existing teaching practices to address this need, however, must be investigated and communicated to teachers. Here, I review the education and sustainability science literature for attributes of resilience to which formal...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Synthesis Palavras-chave: Alaska; Citizen science; Human capital; Metacognition; Pedagogy; Scenarios thinking; Sense of place; Social capital; Social-ecological resilience; Systems thinking.
Ano: 2015
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Electronic Field Guides and User Communities in the Eco-informatics Revolution Ecology and Society
Stevenson, R. D.; University of Massachusetts Boston; robert.stevenson@umb.edu; Haber, William A; Missouri Botanical Garden; whaber@racsa.co.cr; Morris, Robert; UMASS Boston; ram@cs.umb.edu.
The recognition that taxonomy is central to the conservation of biodiversity has reestablished the critical role of taxonomy in biology. However, many of the tools taxonomists produce for the identification and characterization of species, e.g., dichotomous keys, have been difficult to use and largely ignored by the general public in favor of field guides, which are essentially browsable picture guides. We review the role of field guides in species identification and discuss the application of a host of digital technologies to produce user-friendly tools for identification that are likely to greatly enhance species identification in the field by nonspecialists. We suggest that wider adoption of the citizen science model and the use of electronic field...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Bioinformatics; Birding; Citizen science; Ecoinformatics; Field biology; Field guides; Species identification; Taxonomic keys; Taxonomy.
Ano: 2003
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European bounty for taxonomists Naturalis
Fontaine, B.; Achterberg, C. van; Alonso-Zarazaga, M.A.; Araujo, R.; Asche, M.; Aspöck, H.; Aspöck, U.; Audisio, P.; Aukema, B.; Bailly, N.; Balsamo, M.; Bank, R.A.; Belfiore, C.; Bogdanowicz, W.; Boxshall, G.; Burckhardt, D.; Chylarecki, P.; Deharveng, L.; Dubois, A.; Enghoff, H.; Fochetti, R.; Fontaine, C.; Gargominy, O.; Gomez Lopez, M.S.; Goujet, D.; Harvey, M.S.; Heller, K.-G.; Helsdingen, Peter van; Hoch, H.; Jong, Y. de; Karsholt, O.; Los, W.; Magowski, W.; Massard, J.A.; McInnes, S.J.; Mendes, L.F.; Mey, E.; Michelsen, V.; Minelli, A.; Nieto Nafria, J.M.; Nieukerken, E.J. van; Pape, Th.; Prins, W. De; Ramos, M.; Ricci, C.; Roselaar, C.; Rota, E.; Segers, H.; Timm, T.; Tol, J. van; Bouchet, Ph..
Non-professional taxonomists have been responsible for describing more than half of the animal species discovered in Europe from 1998 to 2007 (see also Nature 467, 788; 2010). The extraordinary current rate of description of new species makes Europe an unexpected frontier for biodiversity exploration. The Fauna Europaea database (http://www.faunaeur.org), released in 2004, lists more than 125,000 European species of multicellular terrestrial and freshwater animals. More than 700 new species are described each year in Europe — four times the rate of two centuries ago. However, we have not yet reached saturation in the inventory of European fauna, and we cannot accurately estimate the total number of species living in the continent's ecosystems.
Tipo: Article / Letter to the editor Palavras-chave: Taxonomy; Amateur taxonomists; Citizen science; 42.70.
Ano: 2010 URL: http://www.repository.naturalis.nl/record/364235
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Gender Patterns in Bird-related Recreation in the USA and UK Ecology and Society
Cooper, Caren B; Cornell University, USA; cbc25@cornell.edu; Smith, Jennifer A.; University of Birmingham, UK; JAS661@bham.ac.uk.
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Birding; Bird-watching; Citizen science.
Ano: 2010
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Individual- and community-level impacts of volunteer environmental monitoring: a synthesis of peer-reviewed literature Ecology and Society
Stepenuck, Kristine F; University of Wisconsin-Extension; Nelson Institute of Environmental Studies, University of Wisconsin-Madison; Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources; kris.stepenuck@uvm.edu; Green, Linda T; URI Watershed Watch; University of Rhode Island-Cooperative Extension; lgreen@uri.edu.
Citizens have long contributed to scientific research about the environment through volunteer environmental monitoring programs. Their participation has also resulted in outcomes for themselves, their communities, and the environment. This research synthesizes 35 peer-reviewed journal articles that reported such outcomes through 2012. This collection of articles was derived from a pool of 436 peer-reviewed journal articles about participatory environmental monitoring. Reported outcomes for participants and communities ranged from increasing personal knowledge and community awareness to changing attitudes and behaviors, building social capital, and ultimately, influencing change in natural resource management and policies. Mixed results were reported in...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Citizen science; Impacts; Natural resources; Outcomes; Public participation in scientific research; Volunteer monitoring.
Ano: 2015
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Integrating local pastoral knowledge, participatory mapping, and species distribution modeling for risk assessment of invasive rubber vine (Cryptostegia grandiflora) in Ethiopia’s Afar region Ecology and Society
Luizza, Matthew W.; Colorado State University, Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory; mwluizza@rams.colostate.edu; Wakie, Tewodros; Colorado State University, Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory; tewodros.wakie@colostate.edu; Evangelista, Paul H.; Colorado State University, Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory; paul.evangelista@colostate.edu; Jarnevich, Catherine S.; U.S. Geological Survey, Fort Collins Science Center; jarnevichc@usgs.gov.
The threats posed by invasive plants span ecosystems and economies worldwide. Local knowledge of biological invasions has proven beneficial for invasive species research, but to date no work has integrated this knowledge with species distribution modeling for invasion risk assessments. In this study, we integrated pastoral knowledge with Maxent modeling to assess the suitable habitat and potential impacts of invasive Cryptostegia grandiflora Robx. Ex R.Br. (rubber vine) in Ethiopia’s Afar region. We conducted focus groups with seven villages across the Amibara and Awash-Fentale districts. Pastoral knowledge revealed the growing threat of rubber vine, which to date has received limited attention in Ethiopia, and whose presence in Afar was...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Afar region; Citizen science; Cryptostegia grandiflora; Ethiopia; Invasive species; Local ecological knowledge; Maxent; Participatory mapping; Pastoral livelihoods; Risk assessment; Rubber vine; Species distribution modeling.
Ano: 2016
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Observations of Everyday Biodiversity: a New Perspective for Conservation? Ecology and Society
Raymond, Richard; UMR 7533 LADYSS; ric_raymond@yahoo.com.
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Citizen science; Cognitive processes; Common knowledge; Conservation psychology; Everyday life; Garden Butterflies Watch; Ordinary biodiversity; Planned behavior theory; Self-learning.
Ano: 2012
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Public Participation in Scientific Research: a Framework for Deliberate Design Ecology and Society
Shirk, Jennifer L.; Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Department of Program Development and Evaluation; jls223@cornell.edu; Ballard, Heidi L.; University of California Davis, School of Education; hballard@ucdavis.edu; Wilderman, Candie C.; Environmental Studies Department, Dickinson College; wilderma@dickinson.edu; Phillips, Tina; Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Department of Program Development and Evaluation; cbp6@cornell.edu; Wiggins, Andrea; DataONE, University of New Mexico; awiggins@syr.edu; Jordan, Rebecca; Rutgers University, Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Natural Resources; jordan@aesop.rutgers.edu; McCallie, Ellen; Carnegie Museum of Natural History; MccallieE@carnegiemnh.org; Minarchek, Matthew; Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Department of Program Development and Evaluation; mjm564@cornell.edu; Lewenstein, Bruce V; Department of Communication, Cornell University; bvl1@cornell.edu; Krasny, Marianne E; Department of Natural Resources, Cornell University; mek2@cornell.edu; Bonney, Rick; Cornell Lab of Ornithology, Department of Program Development and Evaluation; reb5@cornell.edu.
Members of the public participate in scientific research in many different contexts, stemming from traditions as varied as participatory action research and citizen science. Particularly in conservation and natural resource management contexts, where research often addresses complex social–ecological questions, the emphasis on and nature of this participation can significantly affect both the way that projects are designed and the outcomes that projects achieve. We review and integrate recent work in these and other fields, which has converged such that we propose the term public participation in scientific research (PPSR) to discuss initiatives from diverse fields and traditions. We describe three predominant models of PPSR and call upon case...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Synthesis Palavras-chave: Citizen science; Community-based monitoring; Conservation; Outcomes; Participation; Public; Volunteer monitoring.
Ano: 2012
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Statistical ecology comes of age ArchiMer
Gimenez, Olivier; Buckland, Stephen T.; Morgan, Byron J. T.; Bez, Nicolas; Bertrand, Sophie; Choquet, Remi; Dray, Stephane; Etienne, Marie-pierre; Fewster, Rachel; Gosselin, Frederic; Merigot, Bastien; Monestiez, Pascal; Morales, Juan M.; Mortier, Frederic; Munoz, Francois; Ovaskainen, Otso; Pavoine, Sandrine; Pradel, Roger; Schurr, Frank M.; Thomas, Len; Thuiller, Wilfried; Trenkel, Verena; De Valpine, Perry; Rexstad, Eric.
The desire to predict the consequences of global environmental change has been the driver towards more realistic models embracing the variability and uncertainties inherent in ecology. Statistical ecology has gelled over the past decade as a discipline that moves away from describing patterns towards modelling the ecological processes that generate these patterns. Following the fourth International Statistical Ecology Conference (1–4 July 2014) in Montpellier, France, we analyse current trends in statistical ecology. Important advances in the analysis of individual movement, and in the modelling of population dynamics and species distributions, are made possible by the increasing use of hierarchical and hidden process models. Exciting research perspectives...
Tipo: Text Palavras-chave: Citizen science; Hidden Markov model; Hierarchical model; Movement ecology; Software package; Spatially explicit capture-recapture; Species distribution modelling; State-space model.
Ano: 2014 URL: http://archimer.ifremer.fr/doc/00249/36026/35298.pdf
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Tackling the motivation to monitor: success and sustainability of a participatory monitoring program Ecology and Society
Singh, Navinder J.; Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences; navinder.singh@slu.se; Danell, Kjell; ; kjell.danell@slu.se; Edenius, Lars; ; lars.edenius@slu.se.
Monitoring of species and their ecosystem attributes is a fundamental requirement in applied ecology and conservation. However, landscape scale monitoring requires an immense effort and commitment, especially when species have a wide distribution or are migratory in nature. Participatory monitoring, whereby local communities are engaged, is increasingly being proposed to address landscape scale monitoring. Its implementation is met with many challenges related to finances, motivation of the local people, lack of trained manpower, and nondirect legal use of the species in question. It is of interest to determine what makes a participatory monitoring program interesting for locals to ensure their long term engagement. Using the unique 26-year program of...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Biology of the species; Citizen science; Cost-effectiveness; Efficiency; Hunter observations; Migratory species; Moose; Social activities; Ungulates.
Ano: 2014
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Trends, challenges, and responses of a 20-year, volunteer water monitoring program in Alabama Ecology and Society
Deutsch, William G; Alabama Water Watch, Auburn University Water Resources Center; deutswg@auburn.edu.
Volunteer water monitoring programs are one of the most popular forms of citizen science, but many face governmental funding cuts and other threats to their continuation. Alabama Water Watch (AWW) is such a program that for more than 20 years has had positive influences on ecosystems and society through environmental education, waterbody protection and restoration, and promotion of improved water policy. A temporal analysis of 15 program indicators revealed 4 phases of AWW that followed general patterns of organizational development. These included periods of rapid growth, cresting, moderate decline, and stabilization at a lower level of activity. Five factors influenced these trends: saturation of potential groups, loss of monitors from aging,...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed article Palavras-chave: Citizen science; Community-based monitoring; Program sustainability; Public participation in scientific research; Volunteer water monitoring.
Ano: 2015
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Understanding the Risk to Neotropical Migrant Bird Species of Multiple Human-Caused Stressors: Elucidating Processes Behind the Patterns. Ecology and Society
Hames, Ralph S.; Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology; rsh5@cornell.edu; Lowe, James D.; Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology; jdl6@cornell.edu; Swarthout, Sara Barker; Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology; sb65@cornell.edu; Rosenberg, Kenneth V.; Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology; kvr2@cornell.edu.
Ubiquitous human-caused changes to the environment act as multiple stressors for organisms in the wild, and the effects of these stressors may be synergistic, rather than merely additive, with unexpected results. However, understanding how focal organisms respond to these stressors is crucial for conservation planning for these species. We propose a paradigm that alternates extensive, broadscale data collection by volunteer collaborators to document patterns of response, with intensive fine-scale studies by professional researchers, to elucidate the processes underlying these patterns. We demonstrate this technique, building on our existing work linking patterns of population declines in the Wood Thrush (Hylocichla mustelina) to synergistic effects of acid...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Multiple scales; Synergistic effects; Citizen science; Habitat fragmentation; Acid rain; Forests; Anthropogenic change; Soil; Calcium; Invertebrates.
Ano: 2006
Registros recuperados: 22
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