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Registros recuperados: 4
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A conceptual framework to evaluate human-wildlife interactions within coupled human and natural systems Ecology and Society
Morzillo, Anita T.; University of Connecticut; anita.morzillo@uconn.edu; de Beurs, Kirsten M.; University of Oklahoma; kdebeurs@ou.edu; Martin-Mikle, Chelsea J.; University of Oklahoma; chelseajane.martin@gmail.com.
Landscape characteristics affect human-wildlife interactions. However, there is a need to better understand mechanisms that drive those interactions, particularly feedbacks that exist between wildlife-related impacts, human reaction to and behavior as a result of those impacts, and how land use and landscape characteristics may influence those components within coupled human and natural systems. Current conceptual models of human-wildlife interactions often focus on species population size as the independent variable driving those interactions. Such an approach potentially overlooks important feedbacks among and drivers of human-wildlife interactions that result from mere wildlife presence versus absence. We describe an emerging conceptual framework...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Coupled human and natural systems; Human-wildlife conflict; Human-wildlife interactions; Landscape ecology; Pesticides; Rodenticides; Wildlife management.
Ano: 2014
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Examining fire-prone forest landscapes as coupled human and natural systems Ecology and Society
Spies, Thomas A; USDA Forest Service; tom.spies@oregonstate.edu; White, Eric M.; Oregon State University; eric.white@oregonstate.edu; Kline, Jeffrey D; USDA Forest Service; jkline@fs.fed.us; Fischer, A. Paige; USDA Forest Service; paigefischer@fs.fed.us; Ager, Alan; USDA Forest Service; aager@fs.fed.us; Bailey, John; Oregon State University; john.bailey@oregonstate.edu; Bolte, John; Oregon State University; boltej@engr.orst.edu; Koch, Jennifer; North Carolina State University; kochje@onid.orst.edu; Platt, Emily; Oregon State University; emily.platt@oregonstate.edu; Olsen, Christine S; Oregon State University; christine.olsen@oregonstate.edu; Jacobs, Derric; Oregon State University; jacobsd@onid.orst.edu; Shindler, Bruce; Oregon State University; bruce.shindler@oregonstate.edu; Steen-Adams, Michelle M; University of New England; msteenadams@une.edu; Hammer, Roger; Oregon State University; rhammer@oregonstate.edu.
Fire-prone landscapes are not well studied as coupled human and natural systems (CHANS) and present many challenges for understanding and promoting adaptive behaviors and institutions. Here, we explore how heterogeneity, feedbacks, and external drivers in this type of natural hazard system can lead to complexity and can limit the development of more adaptive approaches to policy and management. Institutions and social networks can counter these limitations and promote adaptation. We also develop a conceptual model that includes a robust characterization of social subsystems for a fire-prone landscape in Oregon and describe how we are building an agent-based model to promote understanding of this social-ecological system. Our agent-based model, which...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Agent-based model; CHANS; Coupled human and natural systems; Fire policy; Fire-prone landscapes.
Ano: 2014
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Framing sustainability in a telecoupled world. Repositório Alice
LIU, J.; HULL, V.; BATISTELLA, M.; DEFRIES, R.; DIETZ, T.; FU, F.; HERTEL, T. W.; IZAURRALDE, R. C.; LAMBIN, E. F.; LI, S.; MARTINELLI, L. A.; MCCONNELL, W. J.; MORAN, E. F.; NAYLOR, R.; OUYANG, Z.; POLENSKE, K. R.; REENBERG, A.; ROCHA, G. DE M.; SIMMONS, C. S.; VERBURG, P. H.; VITOUSEK, P. M.; ZHANG, F.; ZHU, C..
Interactions between distant places are increasingly widespread and influential, often leading to unexpected outcomes with profound implications for sustainability. Numerous sustainability studies have been conducted within a particular place with little attention to the impacts of distant interactions on sustainability in multiple places. although distant forces have been studied, they are usually treated as exogenous variables and feedbacks have rarely been considered. To understand and integrate various distant interactions better, we propose an integrated framework based on telecoupling, an umbrella concept that refers to socioeconomic and environmental interactions over distances. The concept of telecoupling is a logical extension of research on...
Tipo: Artigo em periódico indexado (ALICE) Palavras-chave: Agents; Causes; Coupled human-environment systems; Coupled human and natural systems; Coupled socialecological systems; Dispersal; Distant interactions; Effects; Feedbacks; Flows; Globalization; Investment; Knowledge transfer; Migration; Socioeconomic and environmental interactions; Species invasion; Sustainability; Technology transfer; Teleconnection; Telecoupling; Trade; Transnational land deals; Water transfer.
Ano: 2013 URL: http://www.alice.cnptia.embrapa.br/handle/doc/961534
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Framing Sustainability in a Telecoupled World Ecology and Society
Liu, Jianguo; Michigan State University, USA; liuji@msu.edu; Hull, Vanessa; Michigan State University, USA; hullvane@csis.msu.edu; Batistella, Mateus; EMBRAPA Satellite Monitoring, Campinas, SP, Brazil; mb@cnpm.embrapa.br; DeFries, Ruth; Columbia University, USA; rd2402@columbia.edu; Dietz, Thomas; Michigan State University, USA; tdietz@msu.edu; Fu, Feng; Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA; fufengenergy@gmail.com; Hertel, Thomas W.; Purdue University, USA; hertel@purdue.edu; Izaurralde, R. Cesar; University of Maryland, USA; cesar.izaurralde@pnnl.gov; Lambin, Eric F.; Stanford University, USA; elambin@stanford.edu; Li, Shuxin; Michigan State University, USA; lishu@msu.edu; McConnell, William J.; Michigan State University, USA; mcconn64@msu.edu; Moran, Emilio F.; Michigan State University, USA; moranef@msu.edu; Naylor, Rosamond; Stanford University, USA; Roz@stanford.edu; Ouyang, Zhiyun; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China; zyouyang@rcees.ac.cn; Polenske, Karen R.; Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA; krp@mit.edu; Reenberg, Anette; University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark; Ar@geogr.ku.dk; Simmons, Cynthia S.; Michigan State University, USA; simmo108@msu.edu; Verburg, Peter H.; Institute for Environmental Studies, VU University Amsterdam, Netherlands; Peter.Verburg@ivm.vu.nl; Vitousek, Peter M.; Stanford University, USA; vitousek@leland.stanford.edu; Zhang, Fusuo; China Agricultural University, Beijing, China; zhangfs@cau.edu.cn; Zhu, Chunquan; International Union for Conservation of Nature, China; caomu1963@126.com.
Interactions between distant places are increasingly widespread and influential, often leading to unexpected outcomes with profound implications for sustainability. Numerous sustainability studies have been conducted within a particular place with little attention to the impacts of distant interactions on sustainability in multiple places. Although distant forces have been studied, they are usually treated as exogenous variables and feedbacks have rarely been considered. To understand and integrate various distant interactions better, we propose an integrated framework based on telecoupling, an umbrella concept that refers to socioeconomic and environmental interactions over distances. The concept of telecoupling is a logical extension of research on...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Synthesis Palavras-chave: Agents; Causes; Coupled human-environment systems; Coupled human and natural systems; Coupled social-ecological systems; Dispersal; Distant interactions; Effects; Feedbacks; Flows; Globalization; Investment; Knowledge transfer; Migration; Socioeconomic and environmental interactions; Species invasion; Sustainability; Technology transfer; Teleconnection; Telecoupling; Trade; Transnational land deals; Water transfer.
Ano: 2013
Registros recuperados: 4
Primeira ... 1 ... Última
 

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