Sabiia Seb
PortuguêsEspañolEnglish
Embrapa
        Busca avançada

Botão Atualizar


Botão Atualizar

Ordenar por: 

RelevânciaAutorTítuloAnoImprime registros no formato resumido
Registros recuperados: 7
Primeira ... 1 ... Última
Imagem não selecionada

Imprime registro no formato completo
Coupled human and natural system dynamics as key to the sustainability of Lake Victoria’s ecosystem services Ecology and Society
Downing, Andrea S.; Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Sweden; Aquatic Ecology and Water Quality Management group, Wageningen University, Netherlands; Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW), Wageningen, Netherlands ; andrea.downing@su.se; van Nes, Egbert H.; Aquatic Ecology and Water Quality Management group, Wageningen University, Netherlands ; Egbert.vannes@wur.nl; Balirwa, John S.; National Fisheries Resources Research Institute (NaFIRRI), Jinja, Uganda; jbalirwa@yahoo.com; Beuving, Joost; Department of Cultural Anthropology and Development Studies, Faculty of Social Sciences, Radboud University, Nijmegen, Netherlands ; joostbeuving@gmail.com; Bwathondi, P.O.J.; University of Dar es Salaam, College of Natural and Applied Sciences, Department of Aquatic Sciences and Fisheries, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania ; bwathondi@yahoo.co.uk; Chapman, Lauren J.; Department of Biology, McGill University, Montreal, Canada; lauren.chapman@mcgill.ca; Cornelissen, Ilse J. M.; Aquaculture & Fisheries Group, Wageningen University, Netherlands; Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW), Wageningen, Netherlands; ilsecornelissen@hotmail.com; Cowx, Iain G.; Hull International Fisheries Institute, University of Hull, United Kingdom; I.G.Cowx@hull.ac.uk; Goudswaard, Kees P. C.; Institute for Marine Resource and Ecosystem Studies (IMARES), Wageningen University, Yerseke, Netherlands; kees.goudswaard@wur.nl; Hecky, Robert E.; Biology Department and Large Lakes Observatory, University of Minnesota-Duluth, USA; rehecky@gmail.com; Janse, Jan H.; Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency (PBL), Bilthoven, Netherlands; Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW), Wageningen, Netherlands; JH.Janse@rivm.nl; Janssen, Annette B. G.; Aquatic Ecology and Water Quality Management group, Wageningen University, Netherlands; Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW), Wageningen, Netherlands; A.Janssen@nioo.knaw.nl; Kaufman, Les; Boston University Marine Program, Biology Department, Boston University, USA ; lesk@bu.edu; Kishe-Machumu, Mary A.; Tanzania Fisheries Research Institute (TAFIRI), Dar es Salaam, Tanzania; mkishe@yahoo.com; Kolding, Jeppe; Department of Biology, University of Bergen, Norway; jeppe.kolding@bio.uib.no; Ligtvoet, Willem; Netherlands Environmental Assessment Agency (PBL), The Hague, Netherlands; Willem.Ligtvoet@pbl.nl; Mbabazi, Dismas; National Fisheries Resources Research Institute (NaFIRRI), Jinja, Uganda; mbabazidismas@yahoo.com; Medard, Modesta; Department of Sociology of Development and Change. Social Science Group, Wageningen University, Netherlands ; modesta.medard@wur.nl; Mkumbo, Oliva C.; Lake Victoria Fisheries Organisation, Jinja, Uganda; ocmkumbo@lvfo.org; Mlaponi, Enock; Tanzania Fisheries Research Institute (TAFIRI), Mwanza, Tanzania; emlaponi@yahoo.com; Munyaho, Antony T.; National Fisheries Resources Research Institute (NaFIRRI), Jinja, Uganda; ataabum@yahoo.com; Nagelkerke, Leopold A. J.; Aquaculture & Fisheries Group, Wageningen University, Netherlands; leo.nagelkerke@wur.nl; Ogutu-Ohwayo, Richard; National Fisheries Resources Research Institute (NaFIRRI), Jinja, Uganda; ogutuohwayo@yahoo.com; Ojwang, William O.; Kenya Marine and Fisheries Research Institute (KMFRI), Kisumu, Kenya; w_ojwang@yahoo.com; Peter, Happy K.; Aquaculture & Fisheries Group, Wageningen University, Netherlands; Happy.Peter@wur.nl; Schindler, Daniel E.; Aquatic & Fishery Sciences/Department of Biology, University of Washington, USA; deschind@uw.edu; Seehausen, Ole; Eawag, Kastanienbaum, Switzerland; Ole.Seehausen@eawag.ch; Sharpe, Diana; Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Panama City, Panama; Department of Biology, McGill University, Montreal, Canada; diana.sharpe@gmail.com; Silsbe, Greg M.; Royal Netherlands Institute for Sea Research, Yerseke, Netherlands; Greg.Silsbe@nioz.nl; Sitoki, Lewis; The Technical University of Kenya, Nairobi, Kenya; Sitoki@hotmail.com; Tumwebaze, Rhoda; National Fisheries Resources Research Institute (NaFIRRI), Jinja, Uganda; t60rhoda@gmail.com; Tweddle, Denis; South African Institute for Aquatic Biodiversity, Grahamstown, South Africa; D.Tweddle@saiab.ac.za; van de Wolfshaar, Karen E.; Institute for Marine Resource and Ecosystem Studies (IMARES), Wageningen University, Ijmuiden, Netherlands; karen.vandewolfshaar@wur.nl; van Dijk, Han; Department of Sociology of Development and Change. Social Science Group, Wageningen University, Netherlands ; han.vandijk@wur.nl; van Donk, Ellen; Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW), Wageningen, Netherlands; E.vandonk@nioo.knaw.nl; van Rijssel, Jacco C.; Institute of Biology, University of Leiden, Netherlands; Naturalis Biodiversity Center, Leiden, Netherlands; Eawag, Kastanienbaum, Switzerland; j.c.van.rijssel@biology.leidenuniv.nl; van Zwieten, Paul A. M.; Aquaculture & Fisheries Group, Wageningen University, Netherlands; paul.vanzwieten@wur.nl; Wanink, Jan; Institute of Biology, University of Leiden, Netherlands; Koeman en Bijkerk bv, Ecological Research and Consultancy, Haren, Netherlands; j.h.wanink@koemanenbijkerk.nl; Witte, F.; Institute of Biology, University of Leiden, Netherlands; Naturalis Biodiversity Center, Leiden, Netherlands;; Mooij, Wolf M.; Aquatic Ecology and Water Quality Management group, Wageningen University, Netherlands; Netherlands Institute of Ecology (NIOO-KNAW), Wageningen, Netherlands ; w.mooij@nioo.knaw.nl.
East Africa’s Lake Victoria provides resources and services to millions of people on the lake’s shores and abroad. In particular, the lake’s fisheries are an important source of protein, employment, and international economic connections for the whole region. Nonetheless, stock dynamics are poorly understood and currently unpredictable. Furthermore, fishery dynamics are intricately connected to other supporting services of the lake as well as to lakeshore societies and economies. Much research has been carried out piecemeal on different aspects of Lake Victoria’s system; e.g., societies, biodiversity, fisheries, and eutrophication. However, to disentangle drivers and dynamics of change in this complex system, we need...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Eutrophication; Feedbacks; Fisheries; Lake Victoria; Model; Multidisciplinary social-ecological system; Sustainability.
Ano: 2014
Imagem não selecionada

Imprime registro no formato completo
Feedback Loops in Conceptual Models of Land Change: Lost in Complexity? Ecology and Society
Hersperger, Anna M.; Swiss Federal Research Institute WSL; anna.hersperger@wsl.ch; Gennaio, Maria-Pia; Swiss Federal Research Institute Agroscope ART; maria.gennaio@art.admin.ch; Verburg, Peter H.; Institute for Environmental Studies, VU University Amsterdam; Peter.Verburg@ivm.vu.nl.
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Response Palavras-chave: Conceptual models; Feedbacks; Land change.
Ano: 2011
Imagem não selecionada

Imprime registro no formato completo
Framing sustainability in a telecoupled world. Repositório Alice
LIU, J.; HULL, V.; BATISTELLA, M.; DEFRIES, R.; DIETZ, T.; FU, F.; HERTEL, T. W.; IZAURRALDE, R. C.; LAMBIN, E. F.; LI, S.; MARTINELLI, L. A.; MCCONNELL, W. J.; MORAN, E. F.; NAYLOR, R.; OUYANG, Z.; POLENSKE, K. R.; REENBERG, A.; ROCHA, G. DE M.; SIMMONS, C. S.; VERBURG, P. H.; VITOUSEK, P. M.; ZHANG, F.; ZHU, C..
Interactions between distant places are increasingly widespread and influential, often leading to unexpected outcomes with profound implications for sustainability. Numerous sustainability studies have been conducted within a particular place with little attention to the impacts of distant interactions on sustainability in multiple places. although distant forces have been studied, they are usually treated as exogenous variables and feedbacks have rarely been considered. To understand and integrate various distant interactions better, we propose an integrated framework based on telecoupling, an umbrella concept that refers to socioeconomic and environmental interactions over distances. The concept of telecoupling is a logical extension of research on...
Tipo: Artigo de periódico Palavras-chave: Socioeconomic and environmental interactions; Investment; Knowledge transfer; Migration; Species invasion; Sustainability; Teleconnection; Telecoupling; Transnational land deals; Water transfer.; Agents; Causes; Coupled human and natural systems; Coupled human-environment systems; Coupled socialecological systems; Dispersal; Distant interactions; Effects; Feedbacks; Flows; Globalization; Technology transfer; Trade..
Ano: 2013 URL: http://www.alice.cnptia.embrapa.br/alice/handle/doc/961534
Imagem não selecionada

Imprime registro no formato completo
Framing Sustainability in a Telecoupled World Ecology and Society
Liu, Jianguo; Michigan State University, USA; liuji@msu.edu; Hull, Vanessa; Michigan State University, USA; hullvane@csis.msu.edu; Batistella, Mateus; EMBRAPA Satellite Monitoring, Campinas, SP, Brazil; mb@cnpm.embrapa.br; DeFries, Ruth; Columbia University, USA; rd2402@columbia.edu; Dietz, Thomas; Michigan State University, USA; tdietz@msu.edu; Fu, Feng; Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA; fufengenergy@gmail.com; Hertel, Thomas W.; Purdue University, USA; hertel@purdue.edu; Izaurralde, R. Cesar; University of Maryland, USA; cesar.izaurralde@pnnl.gov; Lambin, Eric F.; Stanford University, USA; elambin@stanford.edu; Li, Shuxin; Michigan State University, USA; lishu@msu.edu; McConnell, William J.; Michigan State University, USA; mcconn64@msu.edu; Moran, Emilio F.; Michigan State University, USA; moranef@msu.edu; Naylor, Rosamond; Stanford University, USA; Roz@stanford.edu; Ouyang, Zhiyun; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China; zyouyang@rcees.ac.cn; Polenske, Karen R.; Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA; krp@mit.edu; Reenberg, Anette; University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark; Ar@geogr.ku.dk; Simmons, Cynthia S.; Michigan State University, USA; simmo108@msu.edu; Verburg, Peter H.; Institute for Environmental Studies, VU University Amsterdam, Netherlands; Peter.Verburg@ivm.vu.nl; Vitousek, Peter M.; Stanford University, USA; vitousek@leland.stanford.edu; Zhang, Fusuo; China Agricultural University, Beijing, China; zhangfs@cau.edu.cn; Zhu, Chunquan; International Union for Conservation of Nature, China; caomu1963@126.com.
Interactions between distant places are increasingly widespread and influential, often leading to unexpected outcomes with profound implications for sustainability. Numerous sustainability studies have been conducted within a particular place with little attention to the impacts of distant interactions on sustainability in multiple places. Although distant forces have been studied, they are usually treated as exogenous variables and feedbacks have rarely been considered. To understand and integrate various distant interactions better, we propose an integrated framework based on telecoupling, an umbrella concept that refers to socioeconomic and environmental interactions over distances. The concept of telecoupling is a logical extension of research on...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Synthesis Palavras-chave: Agents; Causes; Coupled human-environment systems; Coupled human and natural systems; Coupled social-ecological systems; Dispersal; Distant interactions; Effects; Feedbacks; Flows; Globalization; Investment; Knowledge transfer; Migration; Socioeconomic and environmental interactions; Species invasion; Sustainability; Technology transfer; Teleconnection; Telecoupling; Trade; Transnational land deals; Water transfer.
Ano: 2013
Imagem não selecionada

Imprime registro no formato completo
Information and entropy theory for the sustainability of coupled human and natural systems Ecology and Society
Mayer, Audrey L.; Michigan Technological University; almayer@mtu.edu; Donovan, Richard P.; University of California at Irvine; rpdonova@uci.edu; Pawlowski, Christopher W.; AECOM; cw_pawlowski@yahoo.com.
For coupled human and natural systems (CHANS), sustainability can be defined operationally as a feasible, desirable set of flows (material, currency, information, energy, individuals, etc.) that can be maintained despite internal changes and changes in the environment. Sustainable development can be defined as the process by which CHANS can be moved toward sustainability. Specific indicators that give insight into the structure and behavior of feedbacks in CHANS are of particular interest because they would aid in the sustainable management of these systems through an understanding of the structures that govern system behavior. However, the use of specific feedbacks as monitoring tools is rare, possibly because of uncertainties regarding the nature of...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Synthesis Palavras-chave: CHANS; Feedbacks; Information theory; Sustainability.
Ano: 2014
Imagem não selecionada

Imprime registro no formato completo
Irrigation experiments in the lab: trust, environmental variability, and collective action Ecology and Society
Baggio, Jacopo A.; Center for Behavior, Institutions and the Environment, Arizona State University; Department of Environment and Society, Utah State University; jbaggio@asu.edu; Rollins, Nathan D.; Center for Behavior, Institutions and the Environment, School of Human Evolution and Social Change, Arizona State University; nathan.rollins@asu.edu; Janssen, Marco A.; Center for Behavior, Institutions and the Environment, School of Sustainability, Arizona State University; Marco.Janssen@asu.edu.
Research on collective action and common-pool resources is extensive. However, little work has concentrated on the effect of variability in resource availability and collective action, especially in the context of asymmetric access to resources. Earlier works have demonstrated that environmental variability often leads to a reduction of collective action in the governance of shared resources. Here we assess how environmental variability may impact collective action. We performed a behavioral experiment involving an irrigation dilemma. In this dilemma participants invested first into a public fund that generated water resources for the group, which were subsequently appropriated by one participant at a time from head end to tail end. The amount of resource...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Asymmetry; Common-pool resources; Feedbacks; Laboratory experiments; Trust; Variability.
Ano: 2015
Imagem não selecionada

Imprime registro no formato completo
Separating Adaptive Maintenance (Resilience) and Transformative Capacity of Social-Ecological Systems Ecology and Society
Wilson, Samuel; Melbourne Sustainable Society Institute, The University of Melbourne, Australia; Present address: School of Psychology and Psychiatry, Monash University, Australia;; Pearson, Leonie J; Melbourne Sustainable Society Institute, The University of Melbourne, Australia; Land and Environment, The University of Melbourne, Australia; lpearson@unimelb.edu.au; Kashima, Yoshihisa; Melbourne Sustainable Society Institute, The University of Melbourne, Australia; Psychological Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Australia;; Lusher, Dean; Swinburne Institute of Social Research, Swinburne University of Technology, 3122 Australia;; Pearson, Craig; Melbourne Sustainable Society Institute, The University of Melbourne, Australia;.
Many rural communities are vulnerable social-ecological systems (SES) that must do more than become resilient to future environmental and social shocks: they must transform to achieve sustainability. We aimed first to conceptually explore the proposition that SES characteristics (identity, feedbacks, structure, and functions) necessary for transformation may be distinct from those necessary for adaptive maintenance or resilience, and second, to propose metrics that may be used to assess these two types of system changes. We did this by interrogating literature and by investigating two rural towns in Australia using a combination of quantitative methods and focus groups to interrogate community social networks, capitals (human, natural, built, and social)...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Australia; Feedbacks; Functions; Identity; Structure.
Ano: 2013
Registros recuperados: 7
Primeira ... 1 ... Última
 

Empresa Brasileira de Pesquisa Agropecuária - Embrapa
Todos os direitos reservados, conforme Lei n° 9.610
Política de Privacidade
Área restrita

Embrapa
Parque Estação Biológica - PqEB s/n°
Brasília, DF - Brasil - CEP 70770-901
Fone: (61) 3448-4433 - Fax: (61) 3448-4890 / 3448-4891 SAC: https://www.embrapa.br/fale-conosco

Valid HTML 4.01 Transitional