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Registros recuperados: 7
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Adapting Human Well-being Frameworks for Ecosystem Service Assessments across Diverse Landscapes Ecology and Society
Villamagna, Amy; Department of Fish and Wildlife Conservation, Virginia Tech; amv@vt.edu; Giesecke, Craig; Sustainable Development and Conservation Biology Graduate Program, University of Maryland;.
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Albemarle-Pamlico basin; Ecosystem services; Human well-being; Quality of life.
Ano: 2014
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Assessments of ecosystem services and human well-being in Thailand build and create demand for coproductive capacity Ecology and Society
Lebel, Louis; Chiang Mai University, Thailand; llebel@loxinfo.co.th; Wattana, Suchada; Policy and Planning Bureau, Ministry of Interior, Thailand; suchadawattana@hotmail.com; Talerngsri, Pawin; United Nations Development Programme; pawin.talerngsri@undp.org.
Assessments of ecosystem services have been proposed as one way of incorporating concerns about environmental change and ecosystem conditions into subnational development planning. In Thailand a policy window for such initiatives is opening because of a transition in national policy toward area-based planning combined with broader political reforms to expand public participation and encourage more evidence-based decision making. We explored three case studies in Thailand in which central and local government agencies and research organizations partnered to engage local communities and other stakeholders in assessments of ecosystem services and human well-being. The analysis focused on the role ecosystem assessments play in building and creating demand...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Assessment; Coproductive capacity; Ecosystem services; Evidence-based planning; Human well-being; Problem driven.
Ano: 2015
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Ecosystem Services and Human Well-Being: a Participatory Study in a Mountain Community in Portugal Ecology and Society
Queiroz, Cibele; Universidade de Lisboa; ciqueiroz@clix.pt; Pereira, Henrique Miguel; Universidade de Lisboa; hpereira@stanfordalumni.org; Vicente, Luis; Universidade de Lisboa; lmvicente@fc.ul.pt.
Ecosystem services are essential for human well-being, but the links between ecosystem services and human well-being are complex, diverse, context-dependent, and complicated by the need to consider different spatial and temporal scales to assess them properly. We present the results of a study in the rural community of Sistelo in northern Portugal that formed part of the Portugal Millennium Ecosystem Assessment. The main purpose of our study was to assess the linkages between human well-being and ecosystem services at the local level, as perceived by the community. We used a range of tools that included participatory rural appraisal and rapid rural appraisal as well as other field methods such as direct observation, familiarization and participation in...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Ecosystem services; Human well-being; Participatory rural appraisal; Rapid rural appraisal; Participatory study; Biodiversity; Rural community; Land abandonment; Mountain landscape; Millennium Ecosystem Assessment.
Ano: 2005
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Ecosystem Services, Land-Cover Change, and Stakeholders: Finding a Sustainable Foothold for a Semiarid Biodiversity Hotspot Ecology and Society
Reyers, Belinda; Natural Resources and the Environment, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research; breyers@csir.co.za; Cowling, Richard M.; Department of Botany, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University;; Egoh, Benis N.; Centre for Invasion Biology, Department of Botany and Zoology, Stellenbosch University;; Le Maitre, David C.; Natural Resources and the Environment, Council for Scientific and Industrial Research;; Vlok, Jan H. J.; Regalis Environmental Services;.
Land-cover change has been identified as one of the most important drivers of change in ecosystems and their services. However, information on the consequences of land cover change for ecosystem services and human well-being at local scales is largely absent. Where information does exist, the traditional methods used to collate and communicate this information represent a significant obstacle to sustainable ecosystem management. Embedding science in a social process and solving problems together with stakeholders are necessary elements in ensuring that new knowledge results in desired actions, behavior changes, and decisions. We have attempted to address this identified information gap, as well as the way information is gathered, by quantifying the...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Carbon; Grazing; Human well-being; Land degradation; Ostriches; Tourism; Trade-offs; Water..
Ano: 2009
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Linking Future Ecosystem Services and Future Human Well-being Ecology and Society
Butler, Colin D; Australian National University; colin.butler@anu.edu.au; Oluoch-Kosura, Willis; University of Nairobi; Willis.Kosura@aercafrica.org.
Ecosystem services are necessary, yet not sufficient for human well-being (however defined). Insufficient access to the ecosystem provisioning service of food is a particularly important factor in the loss of human well-being, but all ecosystem services contribute in some way to well-being. Although perhaps long obvious to ecologists, the links between ecosystems and aspects of human well-being, including health, have been less well understood among the social science community. This situation may now be starting to change, thanks in part to the Millennium Ecosystem Assessment (MA). Causality between ecosystem services and well-being is bidirectional; it is increasingly clear that functioning societies can protect or enhance ecosystem services, and...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Cognitive potential; Conflict; Ecosystems; Health; Human well-being; Hunger; Nutrition; Scenarios; Surprise.
Ano: 2006
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Navigating trade-offs in land-use planning: integrating human well-being into objective setting Ecology and Society
Adams, Vanessa M.; Research Institute for the Environment and Livelihoods, Charles Darwin University; Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University; National Environmental Research Program Northern Australia Hub; v.adams@uq.edu.au; Pressey, Robert L.; Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University; National Environmental Research Program Northern Australia Hub; Bob.pressey@jcu.edu.au; Stoeckl, Natalie; School of Business and Cairns Institute, James Cook University; National Environmental Research Program Northern Australia Hub; natalie.stoeckl@jcu.edu.au.
There is an increasing demand for development of natural resources, which can be accompanied by environmental degradation. Planning for multiple land uses requires navigating trade-offs between social, economic, and environmental outcomes arising from different possible futures. To explore these trade-offs, we use the Daly River catchment, in Australia’s Northern Territory, as a case study. The catchment contains areas of priority for both conservation and development. In response to the challenge of navigating the required trade-offs, the Daly River Management Advisory Committee (DRMAC) initiated a land-use plan for the region. Both development and conservation of natural resources in the catchment will affect human well-being and the...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Development; Human well-being; Land-use planning; Objective setting; Stakeholder engagement; Systematic conservation planning.
Ano: 2014
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Resilience and adaptability of rice terrace social-ecological systems: a case study of a local community’s perception in Banaue, Philippines Ecology and Society
Castonguay, Adam C; University of Kiel, Institute for Natural Resource Conservation, Department of Ecosystem Management; Monash University, Department of Civil Engineering; adam.charette.castonguay@monash.edu; Burkhard, Benjamin; University of Kiel, Institute for Natural Resource Conservation, Department of Ecosystem Management; Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research (ZALF); bburkhard@ecology.uni-kiel.de; Horgan, Finbarr G; Crop and Environmental Science Division, International Rice Research Institute; f.horgan@irri.org; Settele, Josef; UFZ-Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research; iDiv, German Centre for Integrative Biodiversity Research Halle-Jena-Leipzig; josef.settele@ufz.de.
The social-ecological systems of rice terraces across Southeast Asia are the result of centuries of long-term interactions between human communities and their surrounding ecosystems. Processes and structures in these systems have evolved to provide a diversity of ecosystem services and benefits to human societies. However, as Southeast Asian countries experience rapid economic growth and related land-use changes, the remaining extensive rice cultivation systems are increasingly under pressure. We investigated the long-term development of ecosystem services and the adaptive capacity of the social-ecological system of rice terrace landscapes using a case study of Banaue (Ifugao Province, Northern-Luzon, Philippines). A set of indicators was used to describe...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Adaptive capacity; Agroecosystems; Complex adaptive systems; Ecosystem services; Human well-being; Ifugao Rice Terraces.
Ano: 2016
Registros recuperados: 7
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