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Registros recuperados: 13
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Boundary object or bridging concept? A citation network analysis of resilience Ecology and Society
Baggio, Jacopo A; Center for Behavior, Institutions and the Environment, School of Human Evolution and Social Change, Arizona State University; jbaggio@asu.edu; Brown, Katrina; Environment and Sustainability Institute, University of Exeter; katrina.brown@exeter.ac.uk; Hellebrandt, Denis; School of International Development, University of East Anglia; d.hellebrandt@uea.ac.uk.
Many recent studies observe the increasing importance, influence, and analysis of resilience as a concept to understand the capacity of a system or individual to respond to change. The term has achieved prominence in diverse scientific fields, as well as public discourse and policy arenas. As a result, resilience has been referred to as a boundary object or a bridging concept that is able to facilitate communication and understanding across disciplines, coordinate groups of actors or stakeholders, and build consensus around particular policy issues. We present a network analysis of bibliometric data to understand the extent to which resilience can be considered as a boundary object or a bridging concept in terms of its links across disciplines and...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Bibliometric analysis; Boundary object; Bridging; Citation; Interdisciplinarity; Network; Resilience.
Ano: 2015
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Catalyst: reimagining sustainability with and through fine art Ecology and Society
Connelly, Angela; Manchester Architecture Research Centre, The University of Manchester, Manchester, UK ; angela.connelly-2@manchester.ac.uk; Guy, Simon C; Faculty of Arts and Social Sciences, Lancaster University, Lancaster, UK ; s.guy@lancaster.ac.uk; Wainwright, Dr. Edward; School of Architecture, Planning & Landscape, Newcastle University, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, UK ; edward.wainwright@ncl.ac.uk; Weileder, Wolfgang; Fine Art, School of Arts and Cultures, Newcastle University, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, UK ; wolfgang.weileder@ncl.ac.uk; Wilde, Marianne; Fine Art, School of Arts and Cultures, Newcastle University, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, UK ; marianne.wilde@ncl.ac.uk.
How might we begin to explore the concept of the “sustainable city” in a world often characterized as dynamic, fluid, and contested? Debates about the sustainable city are too often dominated by a technological discourse conducted among professional experts, but this technocratic framing is open to challenge. For some critics, sustainability is a meaningless notion, yet for others its semantic pliability opens up discursive spaces through which to explore interconnections across time, space, and scale. Thus, while enacting sustainability in policy and practice is an arduous task, we can productively ask how cultural imaginations might be stirred and shaken to make sustainability accessible to a wider public who might join the...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Coproduction; Interdisciplinarity; Practice-led research; Sustainability; Urban.
Ano: 2016
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Characteristics, emerging needs, and challenges of transdisciplinary sustainability science: experiences from the German Social-Ecological Research Program Ecology and Society
Ruppert-Winkel, Chantal; University of Freiburg; chantal.ruppert@zee.uni-freiburg.de; Deppisch, Sonja; HafenCity University Hamburg; sonja.deppisch@hcu-hamburg.de; Eisenack, Klaus; Carl von Ossietzky University of Oldenburg; klaus.eisenack@uni-oldenburg.de; Matzdorf, Bettina; Leibniz Centre for Agricultural Landscape Research (ZALF); matzdorf@zalf.de; Padmanabhan, Martina; University of Passau; Martina.padmanabhan@uni-passau.de; Selbmann, Kirsten; Bochum University of Applied Science; Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research; kirsten.selbmann-lobbedey@hs-bochum.de; Ziegler, Rafael; University of Greifswald; rziegler@uni-greifswald.de; Plieninger, Tobias; University of Copenhagen; tobias.plieninger@ign.ku.dk.
Transdisciplinary sustainability science (TSS) is a prominent way of scientifically contributing to the solution of sustainability problems. Little is known, however, about the practice of scientists in TSS, especially those early in their career. Our objectives were to identify these practices and to outline the needs and challenges for early career scientists in TSS. To that end, we compiled 10 key characteristics of TSS based on a literature survey. We then analyzed research groups with 81 early career scientists against these characteristics. All of these research groups are funded by an ongoing federally funded German program for social-ecological research whose main feature is to promote sustainability-oriented inter- and transdisciplinary research....
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Early career scientists; Interdisciplinarity; Research practice; Self-evaluation; Social-ecological research; Sustainability science; Trandisciplinarity.
Ano: 2015
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Contribuições da pesquisa-ação para o desenvolvimento rural territorial: estudo de caso da rede de agroecologia do Leste paulista. Repositório Alice
CORRALES, F. M.; URCHEI, M. A.; MALAGODI-BRAGA, K. S.; CAMARGO, R. C. R. de; CANUTO, J. C.; QUEIROGA, J. L. de; RAMOS, M. S. T. A. S..
Resumo: Esse trabalho apresenta as fases de consolidação da rede de agroecologia do Leste paulista. Em cooperação com parceiros locais, ocorrem ações de geração e intercâmbio de conhecimentos em Agroecologia. Para tal estão sendo implementadas metodologias participativas junto aos agricultores de referência e outros agricultores rurais dessa localidade, com o intuito de apoiar o processo de transição agroecológica.
Tipo: Separatas Palavras-chave: Transição agroecológica; Interdisciplinaridade; Participação; Agroecological transition; Interdisciplinarity; Participation; Agricultura familiar.
Ano: 2013 URL: http://www.alice.cnptia.embrapa.br/alice/handle/doc/982749
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Enabling Effective Problem-oriented Research for Sustainable Development Ecology and Society
Kueffer, Christoph; Institute of Integrative Biology, ETH Zurich; kueffer@env.ethz.ch; Underwood, Evelyn; Alliance for Global Sustainability, ETH Zurich;; Hirsch Hadorn, Gertrude; Institute for Environmental Decisions, ETH Zurich;; Holderegger, Rolf; Institute of Integrative Biology, ETH Zurich; WSL Swiss Federal Research Institute;; Pohl, Christian; Institute for Environmental Decisions, ETH Zurich;; Schirmer, Mario; Eawag;; Stauffacher, Michael; Institute for Environmental Decisions, ETH Zurich;; Wuelser, Gabriela; Institute for Environmental Decisions, ETH Zurich;; Edwards, Peter; Institute of Integrative Biology, ETH Zurich; Alliance for Global Sustainability, ETH Zurich;.
Environmental problems caused by human activities are increasing; biodiversity is disappearing at an unprecedented rate, soils are being irreversibly damaged, freshwater is increasingly in short supply, and the climate is changing. To reverse or even to reduce these trends will require a radical transformation in the relationship between humans and the natural environment. Just how this can be achieved within, at most, a few decades is unknown, but it is clear that academia must play a crucial role. Many believe, however, that academic institutions need to become more effective in helping societies move toward sustainability. We first synthesize current thinking about this crisis of research effectiveness. We argue that those involved in producing...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Synthesis Palavras-chave: Interdisciplinarity; Knowing-doing gap; Outreach; Participation; Post-normal science; Problem-oriented research; Research partnership; Research policy; Science-policy nexus; Social learning; Transdisciplinarity; Transition management.
Ano: 2012
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Linking classroom learning and research to advance ideas about social-ecological resilience Ecology and Society
Ban, Natalie C.; School of Environmental Studies, University of Victoria; nban@uvic.ca; Boyd, Emily; School of Archaeology, Geography and Environmental Sciences, University of Reading; Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University.; emily.boyd@reading.ac.uk; Cox, Michael; Environmental Studies Program, Dartmouth College; michael.e.cox@dartmouth.edu; Meek, Chanda L.; Department of Political Science, University of Alaska Fairbanks; clmeek@alaska.edu; Schoon, Michael; School of Sustainability, Arizona State University; michael.schoon@asu.edu; Villamayor-Tomas, Sergio; Division of Resource Economics, Humboldt University; villamayortomas@gmail.com.
There is an increasing demand in higher education institutions for training in complex environmental problems. Such training requires a careful mix of conventional methods and innovative solutions, a task not always easy to accomplish. In this paper we review literature on this theme, highlight relevant advances in the pedagogical literature, and report on some examples resulting from our recent efforts to teach complex environmental issues. The examples range from full credit courses in sustainable development and research methods to project-based and in-class activity units. A consensus from the literature is that lectures are not sufficient to fully engage students in these issues. A conclusion from the review of examples is that problem-based and...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Insight Palavras-chave: Complex systems; Interdisciplinarity; Pedagogy; Problem-based learning; Project-based learning; Social-ecological resilience; Social-ecological systems; Teaching.
Ano: 2015
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Pausing at the Brink of Interdisciplinarity: Power and Knowledge at the Meeting of Social and Biophysical Science Ecology and Society
MacMynowski, Dena P; Stanford University; macmynowski@stanford.edu.
Interdisciplinary environmental research has been deemed essential to addressing the dynamics of coupled social-biophysical systems. Although decades of scholarship in science and technology studies (STS) take the analysis of interdisciplinarity out of the realm of anecdote, there is almost no overlap between this literature and discussions of interdisciplinarity in ecology-oriented journals. The goals of researchers in these areas are quite different, and thus far, their analyses of interdisciplinarity have been incommensurate with each other's purposes. To introduce an STS perspective into how environmental scientists think about interdisciplinarity, I argue that biophysical and social scientists are not just bringing information and different...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Synthesis Palavras-chave: Interdisciplinarity; Philosophy of science; Power; Power/knowledge; Social-biophysical systems; Research methods; Transdisciplinarity..
Ano: 2007
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Resilience and Vulnerability: Complementary or Conflicting Concepts? Ecology and Society
Miller, Fiona; Department of Resource Management and Geography, University of Melbourne; millerf@unimelb.edu.au; Osbahr, Henny; School of Agriculture, Policy and Development and the Walker Institute for Climate Systems Research, University of Reading; h.osbahr@reading.ac.uk; Boyd, Emily; Sustainability Research Institute, University of Leeds; Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University; e.boyd@leeds.ac.uk; Bharwani, Sukaina; Stockholm Environment Institute (Oxford); sukaina.bharwani@sei.se; Ziervogel, Gina; Stockholm Environment Institute (Oxford); Climate Systems Analysis Group (CSAG), University of Cape Town; gina@egs.uct.ac.za; Walker, Brian; CSIRO Sustainable Ecosystems, Australia; Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University; Brian.Walker@csiro.au; van der Leeuw, Sander; School of Human Evolution and Social Change, Arizona State University; vanderle@asu.edu; Hinkel, Jochen ; Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research; hinkel@pik-potsdam.de; Downing, Tom; Stockholm Environment Institute (Oxford); tomdowning.sei@gmail.com; Folke, Carl; Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University; The Beijer Institute, Stockholm University; carl.folke@beijer.kva.se; Nelson, Donald; Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research, University of East Anglia; Department of Anthropology, University of Georgia; dnelson@uga.edu.
Resilience and vulnerability represent two related yet different approaches to understanding the response of systems and actors to change; to shocks and surprises, as well as slow creeping changes. Their respective origins in ecological and social theory largely explain the continuing differences in approach to social-ecological dimensions of change. However, there are many areas of strong convergence. This paper explores the emerging linkages and complementarities between the concepts of resilience and vulnerability to identify areas of synergy. We do this with regard to theory, methodology, and application. The paper seeks to go beyond just recognizing the complementarities between the two approaches to demonstrate how researchers are actively engaging...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Synthesis Palavras-chave: Climate change; Hazards; Interdisciplinarity; Resilience; Social-ecological systems; Vulnerability.
Ano: 2010
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The Impossible Sustainability of the Bay of Brest? Fifty Years of Ecosystem Changes, Interdisciplinary Knowledge Construction and Key Questions at the Science-Policy-Community Interface ArchiMer
Ragueneau, Olivier; Raimonet, Melanie; Maze, Camille; Coston-guarini, Jennifer; Chauvaud, Laurent; Danto, Anatole; Grall, Jacques; Jean, Frederic; Paulet, Yves-marie; Thouzeau, Gerard.
In this contribution, the study of the Bay of Brest ecosystem changes over the past 50 years is used to explore the construction of interdisciplinary knowledge and raise key questions that now need to be tackled at the science-policy-communities interface. The Bay of Brest is subject to a combination of several aspects of global change, including excessive nutrient inputs from watersheds and the proliferation of invasive species. These perturbations strongly interact, affecting positively or negatively the ecosystem functioning, with important impacts on human activities. We first relate a cascade of events over these five decades, linking farming activities, nitrogen, and silicon biogeochemical cycles, hydrodynamics of the Bay, the proliferation of an...
Tipo: Text Palavras-chave: Sustainability; Land-ocean continuum; Bay of Brest; Interdisciplinarity; Science-policy-community interface.
Ano: 2018 URL: https://archimer.ifremer.fr/doc/00616/72792/72272.pdf
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The Influence of Philosophical Perspectives in Integrative Research: a Conservation Case Study in the Cairngorms National Park Ecology and Society
Evely, Anna C.; Institute of Biological Sciences, Aberdeen University; anna_evely@abdn.ac.uk; Fazey, Ioan; University of Wales, Aberystwyth; irf@aber.ac.uk; Pinard, Michelle; Institute of Biological Sciences, Aberdeen University; m.a.pinard@abdn.ac.uk; Lambin, Xavier; Institute of Biological Sciences, Aberdeen University; x.lambin@abdn.ac.uk.
The benefits of increasing the contribution of the social sciences in the fields of environmental and conservation science disciplines are increasingly recognized. However, integration between the social and natural sciences has been limited, in part because of the barrier caused by major philosophical differences in the perspectives between these research areas. This paper aims to contribute to more effective interdisciplinary integration by explaining some of the philosophical views underpinning social research and how these views influence research methods and outcomes. We use a project investigating the motivation of volunteers working in an adaptive co-management project to eradicate American Mink from the Cairngorms National Park in Scotland as a...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Synthesis Palavras-chave: Adaptive co-management; Interdisciplinarity; Philosophy; Social– Ecological resilience.
Ano: 2008
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The Interplay of Well-being and Resilience in Applying a Social-Ecological Perspective Ecology and Society
Armitage, Derek; University of Waterloo; derek.armitage@uwaterloo.ca; Charles, Anthony T; Saint Mary's University; Tony.Charles@SMU.CA; Johnson, Derek; University of Manitoba; derek_johnson@umanitoba.ca; Allison, Edward H; The WorldFish Center and the University of East Anglia; e.allison@cgiar.org.
Innovative combinations of social and ecological theory are required to deal with complexity and change in human-ecological systems. We examined the interplay and complementarities that emerge by linking resilience and social well-being approaches. First, we reflected on the limitations of applying ecological resilience concepts to social systems from the perspective of social theory, and particularly, the concept of well-being. Second, we examined the interplay of resilience and well-being concepts in fostering a social-ecological perspective that promises more appropriate management and policy actions. We examined five key points of interplay: (1) the limits of optimization thinking (e.g., maximum sustainable yield), (2) the role of human agency and...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Synthesis Palavras-chave: Adaptation; Agency; Governance; Integration; Interdisciplinarity; Policy; Sustainability; Thresholds; Transdisciplinarity; Uncertainty.
Ano: 2012
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The research journey: travels across the idiomatic and axiomatic toward a better understanding of complexity Ecology and Society
McGowan, Katharine A.; University of Waterloo, Canada; k2mcgowa@uwaterloo.ca; Westley, Frances; University of Waterloo, Canada; fwestley@uwaterloo.ca; Fraser, Evan D. G.; University of Guelph, Canada; frasere@uoguelph.ca; Loring, Philip A.; University of Saskatchewan, Canada; ploring@alaska.edu; Weathers, Kathleen C.; Cary Institute of Ecosystems Studies, United States; weathersk@ecostudies.org; Avelino, Flor; Dutch Research Institute for Transitions, Netherlands; avelino@fsw.eur.nl; Sendzimir, Jan; International Institute of Applied Systems Analysis, Austria; sendzim@iiasa.ac.at; Roy Chowdhury, Rinku; Indiana University (Bloomington), United States; rroychow@indiana.edu; Moore, Michele-Lee; University of Victoria, Canada; mlmoore@uvic.ca.
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Synthesis Palavras-chave: Complexity; Interdisciplinarity; Social-ecological systems; Transdisciplinarity.
Ano: 2014
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The role played by social-ecological resilience as a method of integration in interdisciplinary research Ecology and Society
Beichler, Simone A.; HafenCity University Hamburg; simone.beichler@gmx.de; Hasibovic, Sanin; HafenCity University Hamburg; sanin_hasibovic@gmx.de; Davidse, Bart Jan; HafenCity University Hamburg; bartel-johannes.davidse@hcu-hamburg.de; Deppisch, Sonja; HafenCity University Hamburg; sonja.deppisch@hcu-hamburg.de.
Today’s multifaceted environmental problems, including climate change, necessitate interdisciplinary research. It is however difficult to combine disciplines to study such complex phenomena. We analyzed the experience we gained in applying a particular method of interdisciplinary integration, the ‘bridging concept.’ We outlined the entire process of developing, utilizing, and adapting social-ecological resilience as a bridging concept in a research project involving seven different disciplines. We focused on the tensions and opportunities arising from interdisciplinary dialogue and the understandings and manifestations of resilience in the disciplines involved. By evaluating the specific cognitive and social functions of...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Insight Palavras-chave: Adaptation; Bridging concept; Climate change; Interdisciplinarity; Resilience.
Ano: 2014
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