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Combined effects of global climate change and nutrient enrichment on the physiology of three temperate maerl species ArchiMer
Qui-minet, Zujaila Nohemy; Coudret, Jérôme; Davoult, Dominique; Grall, Jacques; Mendez‐sandin, Miguel; Cariou, Thierry; Martin, Sophie.
Made up of calcareous coralline algae, maerl beds play a major role as ecosystem engineers in coastal areas throughout the world. They undergo strong anthropogenic pressures, which may threaten their survival. The aim of this study was to gain insight into the future of maerl beds in the context of global and local changes. We examined the effects of rising temperatures (+3°C) and ocean acidification (−0.3 pH units) according to temperature and pH projections (i.e., the RCP 8.5 scenario), and nutrient (N and P) availability on three temperate maerl species (Lithothamnion corallioides, Phymatolithon calcareum, and Lithophyllum incrustans) in the laboratory in winter and summer conditions. Physiological rates of primary production, respiration, and...
Tipo: Text Palavras-chave: Calcification; Maerl; Nitrate; Ocean acidification; Ocean warming; Phosphate; Photosynthesis; Respiration.
Ano: 2019 URL: https://archimer.ifremer.fr/doc/00595/70722/68955.pdf
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Ecological and socioeconomic strategies to sustain Caribbean coral reefs in a high-CO2 world ArchiMer
Andersson, Andreas J.; Venn, Alexander A.; Pendleton, Linwood; Brathwaite, Angelique; Camp, Emma; Cooley, Sarah; Gedhill, Dwight; Koch, Marguerite; Maliki, Samir; Manfrino, Carrie.
The Caribbean and Western Atlantic region hosts one of the world’s most diverse geopolitical regions and a unique marine biota distinct from tropical seas in the Pacific and Indian Oceans. While this region varies in human population density, GDP and wealth, coral reefs, and their associated ecosystem services, are central to people’s livelihoods. Unfortunately, the region’s reefs have experienced extensive degradation over the last several decades. This degradation has been attributed to a combination of disease, overfishing, and multiple pressures from other human activities. Furthermore, the Caribbean region has experienced rapid ocean warming and acidification as a result of climate change that will continue and accelerate throughout the 21st century....
Tipo: Text Palavras-chave: Caribbean; Coral reef; Restoration; Climate change; Ocean acidification; Ecosystem services.
Ano: 2019 URL: https://archimer.ifremer.fr/doc/00495/60684/64180.pdf
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Evaluation of a semi-automatic system for long-term seawater carbonate chemistry manipulation RChHN
TORRES,RODRIGO; MANRIQUEZ,PATRICIO H; DUARTE,CRISTIAN; NAVARRO,JORGE M; LAGOS,NELSON A; VARGAS,CRISTIAN A; LARDIES,MARCO A.
The assessment of the effects of Ocean Acidification (OA) on marine life has received increasing attention in recent marine research. On a mesocosmic scale, the CO2 levels in seawater can be manipulated to evaluate experimentally the consequences of OA on marine organisms (vertebrates and invertebrates). An ideal manipulation of carbonate chemistry should mimic exactly the changes to carbonate chemistry, which will occur in years to come. Although some methods have been described in the literature, here we describe in detail a simple, robust and inexpensive system to produce CO2-enriched seawater by bubbling the seawater with air-CO2 mixtures. The system uses mass flow controllers (MFC) to blend atmospheric air with pure CO2 to produce two pCO2 levels. The...
Tipo: Journal article Palavras-chave: Carbonate chemistry manipulation; Ocean acidification.
Ano: 2013 URL: http://www.scielo.cl/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0716-078X2013000400006
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Management strategies for coral reefs and people under global environmental change: 25 years of scientific research ArchiMer
Comte, Adrien; Pendleton, Linwood H.; ,.
Coral reef ecosystems and the people who depend on them are increasingly exposed to the adverse effects of global environmental change (GEC), including increases in sea-surface temperature and ocean acidification. Managers and decision-makers need a better understanding of the options available for action in the face of these changes. We refine a typology of actions developed by Gattuso et al. (2015) that could serve in prioritizing strategies to deal with the impacts of GEC on reefs and people. Using the typology we refined, we investigate the scientific effort devoted to four types of management strategies: mitigate, protect, repair, adapt that we tie to the components of the chain of impact they affect: ecological vulnerability or social vulnerability....
Tipo: Text Palavras-chave: Coral reefs; Climate change; Ocean acidification; Management; Adaptation.
Ano: 2018 URL: https://archimer.ifremer.fr/doc/00418/52917/53872.pdf
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Non-additive effects of ocean acidification in combination with warming on the larval proteome of the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas ArchiMer
Harney, Ewan; Artigaud, Sebastien; Le Souchu, Pierrick; Miner, Philippe; Corporeau, Charlotte; Essid, Hafida; Pichereau, Vianney; Nunes, Flavia.
Increasing atmospheric carbon dioxide results in ocean acidification and warming, significantly impacting marine invertebrate larvae development. We investigated how ocean acidification in combination with warming affected D-veliger larvae of the Pacific oyster Crassostrea gigas. Larvae were reared for 40 h under either control (pH 8.1, 20 °C), acidified (pH 7.9, 20 °C), warm (pH 8.1, 22 °C) or warm acidified (pH 7.9, 20 °C) conditions. Larvae in acidified conditions were significantly smaller than in the control, but warm acidified conditions mitigated negative effects on size, and increased calcification. A proteomic approach employing two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) was used to quantify proteins and relate their abundance to phenotypic traits. In...
Tipo: Text Palavras-chave: Crassostrea gigas; Ocean acidification; Larval development; ATP synthase; GAPDH; Superoxide dismutase.
Ano: 2016 URL: http://archimer.ifremer.fr/doc/00299/40985/40076.pdf
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Ocean Futures Under Ocean Acidification, Marine Protection, and Changing Fishing Pressures Explored Using a Worldwide Suite of Ecosystem Models ArchiMer
Olsen, Erik; Kaplan, Isaac C.; Ainsworth, Cameron; Fay, Gavin; Gaichas, Sarah; Gamble, Robert; Girardin, Raphael; Eide, Cecilie H.; Ihde, Thomas F.; Morzaria-luna, Hem Nalini; Johnson, Kelli F.; Savina-rolland, Marie; Townsend, Howard; Weijerman, Mariska; Fulton, Elizabeth A.; Link, Jason S..
Ecosystem-based management (EBM) of the ocean considers all impacts on and uses of marine and coastal systems. In recent years, there has been a heightened interest in EBM tools that allow testing of alternative management options and help identify tradeoffs among human uses. End-to-end ecosystem modeling frameworks that consider a wide range of management options are a means to provide integrated solutions to the complex ocean management problems encountered in EBM. Here, we leverage the global advances in ecosystem modeling to explore common opportunities and challenges for ecosystem-based management, including changes in ocean acidification, spatial management, and fishing pressure across eight Atlantis (atlantis.cmar.csiro.au) end-to-end ecosystem...
Tipo: Text Palavras-chave: Ecosystem-based management; Fisheries management; Ocean acidification; Marine protected areas; Atlantis ecosystem model.
Ano: 2018 URL: https://archimer.ifremer.fr/doc/00428/53948/55094.pdf
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Oceans and Human Health: A Rising Tide of Challenges and Opportunities for Europe ArchiMer
Fleming, L.e.; Mcdonough, N.; Austen, M.; Mee, L.; Moore, Michael; Hess, Philipp; Depledge, M.h.; White, M.; Philippart, Katja; Bradbrook, P.; Smalley, A..
The European Marine Board recently published a position paper on linking oceans and human health as a strategic research priority for Europe. With this position paper as a reference, the March 2014 Cornwall Oceans and Human Health Workshop brought together key scientists, policy makers, funders, business, and non governmental organisations from Europe and the US to review the recent interdisciplinary and cutting edge research in oceans and human health specifically the growing evidence of the impacts of oceans and seas on human health and wellbeing (and the effects of humans on the oceans). These impacts are a complex mixture of negative influences (e.g. from climate change and extreme weather to harmful algal blooms and chemical pollution) and beneficial...
Tipo: Text Palavras-chave: Harmful algal blooms; Microbial pollution; Anthropogenic chemicals; Marine biotechnology; Climate change; Ocean acidification; Fisheries; Aquaculture; Seafood; Blue carbon; Marine energy; Blue gym; Ocean literacy; Risks; Benefits; EU Policy.
Ano: 2014 URL: http://archimer.ifremer.fr/doc/00192/30328/29066.pdf
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Planetary Boundaries: Exploring the Safe Operating Space for Humanity Ecology and Society
Steffen, Will; Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University; Australian National University, Australia; will.steffen@anu.edu.au; Noone, Kevin; Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University; Department of Applied Environmental Science, Stockholm University; kevin.noone@stockholmresilience.su.se; Chapin, F. Stuart III; Institute of Arctic Biology, University of Alaska Fairbanks; fschapiniii@alaska.edu; Lambin, Eric; Department of Geography, University of Louvain; lambin@geog.ucl.ac.be; Lenton, Timothy M; School of Environmental Sciences, University of East Anglia; t.lenton@uea.ac.uk; Scheffer, Marten; Aquatic Ecology and Water Quality Management Group, Wageningen University; Marten.Scheffer@wur.nl; Folke, Carl; Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University; The Beijer Institute of Ecological Economics, Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences; carl.folke@beijer.kva.se; Schellnhuber, Hans Joachim; Potsdam Institute for Climate Impact Research; Environmental Change Institute and Tyndall Centre, Oxford University ; schellnhuber@pik-potsdam.de; de Wit, Cynthia A; Department of Applied Environmental Science, Stockholm University; cynthia.de.wit@itm.su.se; Hughes, Terry; ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University; terry.hughes@jcu.edu.au; van der Leeuw, Sander; School of Human Evolution and Social Change, Arizona State University; vanderle@asu.edu; Rodhe, Henning; Department of Meteorology, Stockholm University; rodhe@misu.su.se; Snyder, Peter K; Department of Soil, Water, and Climate, University of Minnesota; pksnyder@umn.edu; Costanza, Robert; Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University; Gund Institute for Ecological Economics, University of Vermont; rcostanz@uvm.edu; Svedin, Uno; Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University; uno.svedin@formas.se; Falkenmark, Malin; Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University; Stockholm International Water Institute; malin.falkenmark@siwi.org; Karlberg, Louise; Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University; Stockholm Environment Institute; louise.karlberg@stockholmresilience.su.se; Corell, Robert W; The H. John Heinz III Center for Science, Economics and the Environment ; Corell@heinzctr.org; Fabry, Victoria J; Department of Biological Sciences, California State University San Marcos; fabry@csusm.edu; Hansen, James; NASA Goddard Institute for Space Studies; James.E.Hansen@nasa.gov; Walker, Brian; Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University; CSIRO Sustainable Ecosystems; Brian.Walker@csiro.au; Liverman, Diana; Environmental Change Institute, School of Geography and the Environment; Institute of the Environment, University of Arizona ; diana.liverman@eci.ox.ac.uk; Richardson, Katherine; Earth System Science Centre, University of Copenhagen; kari@science.ku.dk; Crutzen, Paul; Max Planck Institute for Chemistry; air@mpch-mainz.mpg.de; Foley, Jonathan; Institute on the Environment, University of Minnesota; jfoley@umn.edu.
Anthropogenic pressures on the Earth System have reached a scale where abrupt global environmental change can no longer be excluded. We propose a new approach to global sustainability in which we define planetary boundaries within which we expect that humanity can operate safely. Transgressing one or more planetary boundaries may be deleterious or even catastrophic due to the risk of crossing thresholds that will trigger non-linear, abrupt environmental change within continental- to planetary-scale systems. We have identified nine planetary boundaries and, drawing upon current scientific understanding, we propose quantifications for seven of them. These seven are climate change (CO2 concentration in the atmosphere <350 ppm and/or a maximum change...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Atmospheric aerosol loading; Biogeochemical nitrogen cycle; Biological diversity; Chemical pollution; Climate change; Earth; Global freshwater use; Land system change; Ocean acidification; Phosphorus cycle; Planetary boundaries; Stratospheric ozone; Sustainability.
Ano: 2009
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Solutions for ecosystem-level protection of ocean systems under climate change ArchiMer
Queiros, Ana M.; Huebert, Klaus B.; Keyl, Friedemann; Fernandes, Jose A.; Stolte, Willem; Maar, Marie; Kay, Susan; Jones, Miranda C.; Hamon, Katell; Hendriksen, Gerrit; Vermard, Youen; Marchal, Paul; Teal, Lorna R.; Somerfield, Paul J.; Austen, Melanie C.; Barange, Manuel; Sell, Anne F.; Allen, Icarus; Peck, Myron A..
The Paris Conference of Parties (COP21) agreement renewed momentum for action against climate change, creating the space for solutions for conservation of the ocean addressing two of its largest threats: climate change and ocean acidification (CCOA). Recent arguments that ocean policies disregard a mature conservation research field and that protected areas cannot address climate change may be oversimplistic at this time when dynamic solutions for the management of changing oceans are needed. We propose a novel approach, based on spatial meta-analysis of climate impact models, to improve the positioning of marine protected areas to limit CCOA impacts. We do this by estimating the vulnerability of ocean ecosystems to CCOA in a spatially explicit manner and...
Tipo: Text Palavras-chave: Climate change; Conservation; COP21; Ecosystem model; Habitat; Marine spatial planning; Ocean; Ocean acidification; Species distribution; Warming.
Ano: 2016 URL: http://archimer.ifremer.fr/doc/00360/47089/48566.pdf
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The planktonic stages of the salmon louse ( Lepeophtheirus salmonis) are tolerant of end-of-century p CO2 concentrations ArchiMer
Thompson, Cameron R.s.; Fields, David M.; Bjelland, Reidun M.; Chan, Vera Bin San; Durif, Caroline M.f.; Mount, Andrew; Runge, Jeffrey A.; Shema, Steven D.; Skiftesvik, Anne Berit; Browman, Howard I..
The copepod Lepeophtheirus salmonis is an obligate ectoparasite of salmonids. Salmon lice are major pests in salmon aquaculture and due to its economic impact Lepeoph- theirus salmonis is one of the most well studied species of marine parasite. However, there is limited understanding of how increased concentration of pCO2 associated with ocean acidification will impact host-parasite relationships. We investigated the effects of increased pCO2 on growth and metabolic rates in the planktonic stages, rearing L. salmonis from eggs to 12 days post hatch copepodids under three treatment levels: Control (416 matm), Mid (747 matm), and High (942 matm). The pCO2 treatment had a significant effect on oxygen consumption rate with the High treatment animals exhibiting...
Tipo: Text Palavras-chave: Salmon lice; Copepod; Ocean acidification; Parasite; Energetics; Metabolism; Growth; Lipid; Lepeophtheirus salmonis; Aquaculture.
Ano: 2019 URL: https://archimer.ifremer.fr/doc/00588/69998/67911.pdf
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