Sabiia Seb
PortuguêsEspañolEnglish
Embrapa
        Busca avançada

Botão Atualizar


Botão Atualizar

Ordenar por: RelevânciaAutorTítuloAnoImprime registros no formato resumido
Registros recuperados: 2
Primeira ... 1 ... Última
Imagem não selecionada

Imprime registro no formato completo
Managing for Old Growth in Frequent-fire Landscapes Ecology and Society
Fiedler, Carl E.; College of Forestry and Conservation, University of Montana; carl.fiedler@umontana.edu; Friederici, Peter; School of Communication, Northern Arizona University; peter.friederici@nau.edu; Petruncio, Mark; Forestry Program, Yakama Nation; petruncio@yakama.com; Denton, Charles; Ecological Restoration Institute; Charles.Denton@nau.edu; Hacker, W. David; Forestry Department, New Mexico Highlands University; david_hacker@nmhu.edu.
There is no one-size-fits-all approach to managing frequent-fire, old-growth forests. However, there are general guidelines to follow: 1) set objectives for both structure (tree density, diameter distribution, tree species composition, spatial arrangement, amount of coarse woody debris) and function (nutrient cycling, desired tree species regeneration); 2) prioritize treatments according to ecological, economic, and social needs and risks; 3) identify the potential treatments (natural fire, prescribed fire, silvicultural cutting) that best meet the objectives and scale of the project; and 4) implement the treatment(s). We discuss each of these guidelines in this article.
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed article Palavras-chave: Fire; Forest management; Function; Silvicultural treatments; Structure; Thinning.
Ano: 2007
Imagem não selecionada

Imprime registro no formato completo
Monitoring Old Growth in Frequent-fire Landscapes Ecology and Society
Fiedler, Carl E.; College of Forestry and Conservation, University of Montana; carl.fiedler@umontana.edu; Friederici, Peter; School of Communication, Northern Arizona University; peter.friederici@nau.edu; Petruncio, Mark; Forestry Program, Yakama Nation; petruncio@yakama.com.
In this article, we discuss how to monitor the structural and functional attributes of old growth, as well as its associated plant communities and wildlife, both to determine the possible need for treatment and to assess post-treatment progress toward desired conditions. Monitoring can be used to detect conditions (or agents) that threaten existing old growth and also to document indicators of healthy, functioning old-growth systems.
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed article Palavras-chave: Disturbance agents; Monitoring; Physiological/functional indicators; Risk assessment; Structural indicators.
Ano: 2007
Registros recuperados: 2
Primeira ... 1 ... Última
 

Empresa Brasileira de Pesquisa Agropecuária - Embrapa
Todos os direitos reservados, conforme Lei n° 9.610
Política de Privacidade
Área restrita

Embrapa
Parque Estação Biológica - PqEB s/n°
Brasília, DF - Brasil - CEP 70770-901
Fone: (61) 3448-4433 - Fax: (61) 3448-4890 / 3448-4891 SAC: https://www.embrapa.br/fale-conosco

Valid HTML 4.01 Transitional