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Registros recuperados: 9
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Can scenario-planning support community-based natural resource management? Experiences from three countries in Latin America Ecology and Society
Waylen, Kerry A; Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences Group, The James Hutton Institute; kerry.waylen@hutton.ac.uk; Martin-Ortega, Julia; Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences Group, The James Hutton Institute; Sustainability Research Institute, School of Earth and the Environment and water@leeds, University of Leeds; J.MartinOrtega@leeds.ac.uk; Blackstock, Kirsty L; Social, Economic and Geographical Sciences Group, The James Hutton Institute; kirsty.blackstock@hutton.ac.uk; Brown, Iain; Information and Computational Sciences Group, The James Hutton Institute; iain.brown@hutton.ac.uk; Escalante Semerena, Roberto Ivan; Faculty of Economics, National Autonomous University of Mexico (UNAM); semerena@unam.mx; Farah Quijano, Maria Adelaida; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana-Faculty of Environmental and Rural Studies; mafarahq@gmail.com; Ortiz-Guerrero, Cesar E.; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana; c.ortiz@javeriana.edu.co.
Community-based natural resource management (CBNRM) is a concept critical to managing social-ecological systems but whose implementation needs strengthening. Scenario planning is one approach that may offer benefits relevant to CBNRM but whose potential is not yet well understood. Therefore, we designed, trialed, and evaluated a scenario-planning method intended to support CBNRM in three cases, located in Colombia, Mexico, and Argentina. Implementing scenario planning was judged as worthwhile in all three cases, although aspects of it were challenging to facilitate. The benefits generated were relevant to strengthening CBNRM: encouraging the participation of local people and using their knowledge, enhanced consideration of and adaptation to future change,...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Argentina; Climate change; Colombia; Community-based conservation; Futures thinking; Mexico; Participation; Scenario methods; Wicked problems.
Ano: 2015
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Combining Science and Traditional Ecological Knowledge: Monitoring Populations for Co-Management Ecology and Society
Moller, Henrik; University of Otago; henrik.moller@stonebow.otago.ac.nz; Berkes, Fikret; University of Manitoba; berkes@cc.umanitoba.ca; Lyver, Philip O'Brian; University of Otago; LyverP@landcareresearch.co.nz; Kislalioglu, Mina; University of Manitoba; mberkes@mts.net.
Using a combination of traditional ecological knowledge and science to monitor populations can greatly assist co-management for sustainable customary wildlife harvests by indigenous peoples. Case studies from Canada and New Zealand emphasize that, although traditional monitoring methods may often be imprecise and qualitative, they are nevertheless valuable because they are based on observations over long time periods, incorporate large sample sizes, are inexpensive, invite the participation of harvesters as researchers, and sometimes incorporate subtle multivariate cross checks for environmental change. A few simple rules suggested by traditional knowledge may produce good management outcomes consistent with fuzzy logic thinking. Science can sometimes...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Adaptive management; Catch per unit effort; Community-based conservation; Customary harvesting; Indigenous people; Population monitoring; Sustainability; New Zealand; Canada.
Ano: 2004
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Community-Based Conservation and Traditional Ecological Knowledge: Implications for Social-Ecological Resilience Ecology and Society
Our review highlights how traditional ecological knowledge influences people's adaptive capacity to social-ecological change and identifies a set of mechanisms that contribute to such capacity in the context of community-based biodiversity conservation initiatives. Twenty-three publications, including twenty-nine case studies, were reviewed with the aim of investigating how local knowledge, community-based conservation, and resilience interrelate in social-ecological systems. We highlight that such relationships have not been systematically addressed in regions where a great number of community conservation initiatives are found; and we identify a set of factors that foster people's adaptive capacity to social-ecological change and a number of social...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Adaptive capacity; Biodiversity conservation; Community-based conservation; Ecosystem services; Local ecological knowledge; Natural resource management; Social-ecological change; Social-ecological resilience; Traditional ecological knowledge.
Ano: 2013
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Growth, Collapse, and Reorganization of the Annapurna Conservation Area, Nepal: an Analysis of Institutional Resilience Ecology and Society
Baral, Nabin; Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation, Virginia Tech; nbaral@vt.edu; Stern, Marc J; Department of Forest Resources and Environmental Conservation, Virginia Tech; mjstern@vt.edu; Heinen, Joel T; Department of Earth and Environment, Florida International University ; heinenj@fiu.edu.
Community-based conservation institutions can be conceptualized as complex adaptive systems that pass through a cycle of growth, maturation, collapse, and reorganization. We test the applicability of this four-phase adaptive cycle in the institutional context of the Annapurna Conservation Area (ACA), Nepal. We use the adaptive cycle to assess changes in structures and processes and to explore the past, present, and possible future trends in ACA. We focus on the crisis brought about by the Maoist insurgency and changes that took place in ACA during and after this period. Our analysis suggests that the conservation institution has passed through one and a half forms of the adaptive cycle in five major historical periods in the Annapurna region since 1960. It...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Annapurna; Adaptive cycle; Community-based conservation; Protected areas management; Resilience; Social-ecological system; Sustainability science.
Ano: 2010
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Innovation in Management Plans for Community Conserved Areas: Experiences from Australian Indigenous Protected Areas Ecology and Society
Davies, Jocelyn; CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences; Jocelyn.Davies@csiro.au; Hill, Rosemary; CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences; ro.hill@csiro.au; Walsh, Fiona J; CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences; Fiona.Walsh@csiro.au; Sandford, Marcus; Australian Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities; Indigenous Protected Areas Program; marcus.sandford@environment.gov.au; Smyth, Dermot; Smyth and Bahrdt Consultants; Charles Darwin University; dermot@sbconsultants.com.au; Holmes, Miles C; Beit Holmes and Associates Pty Ltd; University of Queensland; Milesholmes@internode.on.net.
Increasing attention to formal recognition of indigenous and community conserved areas (ICCAs) as part of national and/or global protected area systems is generating novel encounters between the customary institutions through which indigenous peoples and local communities manage these traditional estates and the bureaucratic institutions of protected area management planning. Although management plans are widely considered to be important to effective management of protected areas, little guidance has been available about how their form and content can effectively reflect the distinctive socio-cultural and political characteristics of ICCAs. This gap has been particularly apparent in Australia where a trend to rapidly increased formal engagement of...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Aboriginal land management; Community-based conservation; Indigenous community conserved areas; Indigenous protected areas; Management effectiveness; Planning.
Ano: 2013
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Integrating traditional knowledge when it appears to conflict with conservation: lessons from the discovery and protection of sitatunga in Ghana Ecology and Society
McPherson, Jana M.; Centre for Conservation Research, Calgary Zoological Society; janam@calgaryzoo.com; Sammy, Joy; Centre for Conservation Research, Calgary Zoological Society; Protected Areas and Poverty Reduction Canada-Africa Learning Alliance, Vancouver Island University; joy.sammy@gmail.com; Sheppard, Donna J.; Centre for Conservation Research, Calgary Zoological Society; Nature Conservation Research Centre; Protected Areas and Poverty Reduction Canada-Africa Learning Alliance, Vancouver Island University; Rural Studies, School of Environmental Design and Rural Development, University of Guelph; donnas@calgaryzoo.com; Mason, John J.; Nature Conservation Research Centre; jos091963@gmail.com; Brichieri-Colombi, Typhenn A.; Centre for Conservation Research, Calgary Zoological Society; TyphenBC@calgaryzoo.com; Moehrenschlager, Axel; Centre for Conservation Research, Calgary Zoological Society; axelm@calgaryzoo.com.
Cultural traditions can conflict with modern conservation goals when they promote damage to fragile environments or the harvest of imperiled species. We explore whether and how traditional, culturally motivated species exploitation can nonetheless aid conservation by examining the recent “discovery” in Avu Lagoon, Ghana, of sitatunga (Tragelaphus spekii gratus), a species familiar to locals, but not previously scientifically recorded in Ghana and regionally assumed extinct. Specifically, we investigate what role traditional beliefs, allied hunting practices, and the associated traditional ecological knowledge have played in the species’ discovery and subsequent community-based conservation; how they might influence future...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Anlo-Keta Lagoon Complex; Community-based conservation; Local knowledge; Shrines; Traditional beliefs; Traditional ecological knowledge; Traditional species harvest; Tragelaphus spekii gratus.
Ano: 2016
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Motivating residents to combat invasive species on private lands: social norms and community reciprocity Ecology and Society
Niemiec, Rebecca M; Emmett Interdisciplinary Program in Environment and Resources, Stanford University; rniemiec@stanford.edu; Ardoin, Nicole M; Graduate School of Education and Woods Institute for the Environment, Stanford University; nmardoin@stanford.edu; Wharton, Candace B; Hawaiʻi Community College, Hilo; cbwharto@hawaii.edu; Asner, Gregory P; Department of Global Ecology, Carnegie Institution for Science; gpa@carnegiescience.edu.
Invasive species (IS) threaten biodiversity and ecosystem functioning. To achieve landscape-scale reductions in IS and the associated gains for biodiversity, IS control efforts must be expanded across private lands. Enhancing IS control across private lands requires an understanding of the factors that motivate residents to engage or prohibit residents from engaging in efforts to control IS. Drawing from the collective interest model and literature, we sought to understand how a wide range of interpersonal, intrapersonal, and contextual factors might influence resident action around combating the invasive tree albizia (Falcataria moluccana), in the Puna District of Hawaiʻi. To do so, we used a cross-sectional survey of 243 residents and elastic...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Community-based conservation; Conservation; Environmental behavior; Hawaiʻ I; Invasive species; Private lands.
Ano: 2016
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Moving Toward Spatial Solutions in Marine Conservation with Indigenous Communities Ecology and Society
Ban, Natalie C; Project Seahorse; University of British Columbia Fisheries Centre; n.ban@fisheries.ubc.ca; Vincent, Amanda C.J.; Project Seahorse; University of British Columbia Fisheries Centre; a.vincent@fisheries.ubc.ca.
Community and resource user support has often been declared as essential to achieving globally agreed targets for marine protection. Given that indigenous people in Canada have resource use rights, we engaged two indigenous communities in British Columbia for their views on marine planning and protected areas. We developed a three-phased approach for executing our research: building research partnerships, carrying out individual interviews, and holding community discussion sessions. Participants expressed a common goal of recovering depleted species and ensuring the sustainability of indigenous fishing. We found strong support for spatial protection measures, and significant overlaps amongst participants in the areas suggested for protection. The most...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Aboriginal fisheries; British Columbia; Canada; Commercial fisheries; Community-based conservation; Indigenous communities; Marine conservation; Marine protected areas.
Ano: 2008
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Sustainability or Colonialism? Legislative obstacles to research and development of natural products and patents on traditional knowledge in Brazil Acta Botanica
Pedrollo,Camilo Tomazini; Kinupp,Valdely Ferreira.
ABSTRACTHistorically, developed countries have benefited from the biodiversity and traditional knowledge of developing countries. Since the Convention on Biological Diversity (CBD) was approved, the world-view regarding access to biological resources has changed. This change marked the introduction of legal agreements regarding access to genetic resources, traditional knowledge and benefit sharing, seeking a fair return for owners and local communities. Unfortunately, as with most national laws, these legal devices complicated collection programs and research initiatives, and diminished the emphasis on the discovery of natural products. There remains a lack of discussion on the establishment of a fair international market value for the access to genetic...
Tipo: Info:eu-repo/semantics/other Palavras-chave: Community-based conservation; Ecosystem management; Ethics; Human rights; Politics and policy.
Ano: 2015 URL: http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0102-33062015000300452
Registros recuperados: 9
Primeira ... 1 ... Última
 

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