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Registros recuperados: 147
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A Governing Framework for Climate Change Adaptation in the Built Environment Ecology and Society
Mazmanian, Daniel A.; University of Southern California; mazmania@price.usc.edu; Jurewitz, John; Pomona College; john.jurewitz@gmail.com; Nelson, Hal T.; Claremont Graduate University; hal.nelson@cgu.edu.
Developing an approach to governing adaptation to climate change is severely hampered by the dictatorship of the present when the needs of future generations are inadequately represented in current policy making. We posit this problem as a function of the attributes of adaptation policy making, including deep uncertainty and nonstationarity, where past observations are not reliable predictors of future outcomes. Our research links organizational decision-making attributes with adaptation decision making and identifies cases in which adaptation actions cause spillovers, free riding, and distributional impacts. We develop a governing framework for adaptation that we believe will enable policy, planning, and major long-term development decisions to be made...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Adaptive management; California; Climate change adaptation; Governance; Planning.
Ano: 2013
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A Life-Cycle Perspective on Governing Cooperative Enterprises in Agriculture AgEcon
Hueth, Brent; Reynolds, Anne.
Tipo: Journal Article Palavras-chave: Cooperatives; Governance; Life Cycle; Competition; Finance; Agribusiness; Q12; Q13; Q14.
Ano: 2011 URL: http://purl.umn.edu/117411
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A mixed-methods approach to assessing success in transitioning water management institutions: a case study of the Platte River Basin, Nebraska Ecology and Society
Hoffman Babbitt, Christina; School of Natural Resources, University of Nebraska-Lincoln; christinahoffmanm@gmail.com; Burbach, Mark; School of Natural Resources, University of Nebraska-Lincoln; mburbach1@unl.edu; Pennisi, Lisa; School of Natural Resources, University of Nebraska-Lincoln; lpennisi2@unl.edu.
To address increasing conflicts between surface water and groundwater users, the state of Nebraska has adopted a more localized and integrated approach in managing water resources. Integrated approaches offer promise in better managing connected water resources within the state; however, little review of the potential benefits and/or challenges of these actions has been conducted. This case study uses both qualitative and quantitative data collection efforts to take an in-depth look at how this new and innovative management system is working through the eyes of stakeholders living and working in the basin. Data collection reveals that overall the current water management system is working relatively well, even though it is still in its infancy. However,...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Common pool resources; Governance; Integrated water resources management; Mixed-methods research.
Ano: 2015
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A systemic framework for context-based decision making in natural resource management: reflections on an integrative assessment of water and livelihood security outcomes following policy reform in South Africa Ecology and Society
Pollard, Sharon; The Association for Water and Rural Development; sharon@award.org.za; Biggs, Harry; SANParks; Harry.Biggs@sanparks.org; Du Toit, Derick R; The Association for Water and Rural Development; derick@award.org.za.
We aimed to contribute to the field of natural resource management (NRM) by introducing an alternative systemic context-based framework for planning, research, and decision making, which we expressed practically in the development of a decision-making “tool” or method. This holistic framework was developed in the process of studying a specific catchment area, i.e., the Sand River Catchment, but we have proposed that it can be generalized to studying the complexities of other catchment areas. Using the lens of systemic resilience to think about dynamic and complex environments differently, we have reflected on the development of a systemic framework for understanding water and livelihood security under transformation in postapartheid...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Complexity; Decision making; Dynamic; Governance; IWRM; Livelihood security; Resilience; SES; Social-ecological systems; Transdisciplinarity; Transformation.
Ano: 2014
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A Typology of Benefit Sharing Arrangements for the Governance of Social-Ecological Systems in Developing Countries Ecology and Society
Nkhata, Bimo Abraham; Water Research Node, Monash South Africa; bimo.nkhata@monash.edu; Mosimane, Alfons; Centre for Environment, Agriculture and Development, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa; alfons.mosimane@gmail.com; Downsborough, Linda; Water Research Node, Monash South Africa; Linda.Downsborough@monash.edu; Breen, Charles; Centre for Environment, Agriculture and Development, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa; breenc@telkomsa.net; Roux, Dirk J; Water Research Node, Monash South Africa; dirk.roux@monash.edu.
This study explores and interprets relevant literature to construct a typology of benefit sharing arrangements for the governance of social-ecological systems in developing countries. The typology comprises three generic categories of benefit sharing arrangements: collaborative, market-oriented, and egalitarian. We contend that the three categories provide a useful basis for exploring and classifying the different societal arrangements required for governance of social-ecological systems. The typology we present is founded on a related set of explicit assumptions that can be used to explore and better understand the linkages among ecosystem services, benefit sharing, and governance. Issues that are strongly related to sustainability in developing countries...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Synthesis Palavras-chave: Benefit sharing; Developing countries; Ecosystem services; Governance; Social-ecological systems; Typology.
Ano: 2012
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A Typology of Indigenous Engagement in Australian Environmental Management: Implications for Knowledge Integration and Social-ecological System Sustainability Ecology and Society
Hill, Rosemary; CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences; James Cook University, School of Earth and Environmental Sciences; ro.hill@csiro.au; Grant, Chrissy; CTG Services; chrissy@webone.com.au; George, Melissa; Consultant; melissa@georgefenton.com.au; Robinson, Catherine J; CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences; catherine.robinson@csiro.au; Jackson, Sue; CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences; sue.jackson@csiro.au; Abel, Nick; CSIRO Ecosystem Sciences; nick.abel@csiro.au.
Indigenous peoples now engage with many decentralized approaches to environmental management that offer opportunities for integration of Indigenous Ecological Knowledge (IEK) and western science to promote cultural diversity in the management of social-ecological system sustainability. Nevertheless, processes of combining IEK with western science are diverse and affected by numerous factors, including the adaptive co-management context, the intrinsic characteristics of the natural resources, and the governance systems. We present a typology of Indigenous engagement in environmental management, derived through comparative analysis of 21 Australian case studies, and consider its implications for the integration of IEK with western science. Sociological and...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Environmental planning; Indigenous ecological knowledge; Integration; Intercultural; Governance; Natural resource management.
Ano: 2012
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Adaptive Comanagement in the Venice Lagoon? An Analysis of Current Water and Environmental Management Practices and Prospects for Change Ecology and Society
Munaretto, Stefania; University IUAV of Venice, Faculty of Urban and Regional Planning, Venice, Italy; VU University - Institute for Environmental Studies (IVM), Amsterdam, Netherlands; stefania.munaretto@ivm.vu.nl; Huitema, Dave; VU University - Institute for Environmental Studies (IVM), Amsterdam, Netherlands; dave.huitema@ivm.vu.nl.
Adaptive comanagement (ACM) is often suggested as a way of handling the modern challenges of environmental governance, which include uncertainty and complexity. ACM is a novel combination of the learning dimension of adaptive management and the linkage dimension of comanagement. As has been suggested, there is a need for more insight on enabling policy environments for ACM success and failure. Picking up on this agenda we provide a case study of the world famous Venice lagoon in Italy. We address the following questions: first, to what extent are four institutional prescriptions typically associated with ACM currently practiced in the Venice system? Second, to what extent is learning taking place in the Venice system? Third, how is learning related to the...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Adaptiveness; Comanagement; Governance; Institutions; Learning; Venice lagoon.
Ano: 2012
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Adaptive Co-management Networks: a Comparative Analysis of Two Fishery Conservation Areas in Sweden Ecology and Society
Rova, Carl; Division of Social Science/Political Science Unit, Luleå University of Technology, Sweden; carl.rova@ltu.se.
Co-management constitutes a certain type of institutional arrangement that has gained increased attention among both policy makers and researchers involved in the field of natural resource management. Yet the concept of co-management is broad, and our knowledge about how different kinds of management structures affect the ability to deal with challenges pertinent to the commons is limited. One of these challenges is to foster an adaptive management process, i.e., a process in which rules are continuously revised and changed according to what is known about the ecological system. We aim to address the relationship between different kinds of co-management structures and adaptive management. To this end, we conducted a comparative case study of two Fishery...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Adaptive management; Co-management; Governance; Natural resource management; Social networks; Social network analysis; SNA.
Ano: 2010
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Addressing surprise and uncertain futures in marine science, marine governance, and society Ecology and Society
Thrush, Simon F; Institute of Marine Science, The University of Auckland; School of Environment, The University of Auckland; simon.thrush@auckland.ac.nz; Lewis, Nick; School of Environment, The University of Auckland; n.lewis@auckland.ac.nz; Le Heron, Richard; School of Environment, The University of Auckland; r.leheron@auckland.ac.nz; Fisher, Karen T; School of Environment, The University of Auckland; k.fisher@auckland.ac.nz; Lundquist, Carolyn J; Institute of Marine Science, The University of Auckland; National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, Hamilton, New Zealand; carolyn.lundquist@niwa.co.nz; Hewitt, Judi; National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research, Hamilton, New Zealand; Judi.Hewitt@niwa.co.nz.
On an increasingly populated planet, with decreasing biodiversity and limited new opportunities to tap unexploited natural resources, there is a clear need to adjust aspects of marine management and governance. Although sectarian management has succeeded in addressing and managing some important threats to marine ecosystems, unintended consequences are often associated with overlooking nonlinear interactions and cumulative impacts that increase the risk of surprises in social-ecological systems. In this paper, we begin to untangle science-governance-society (SGS) interdependencies in marine systems by considering how to recognize the risk of surprise in social and ecological dynamics. Equally important is drawing attention to our state of preparedness,...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Insight Palavras-chave: Governance; Management; Marine ecosystems; Regime shift; Resilience; Science; Society.
Ano: 2016
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Agriculture in a Water-Scarce World AgEcon
Gilmour, Brad; Jotanovic, Aleksandar; Gurung, Rajendra Kumar; Polcyn, Tania; Deng, Hugh.
With a relatively small population and 7% of the world's available freshwater resources, Canada is well placed for a world of water scarcity where the real value of water in its many uses becomes more and more apparent. However, action is necessary to ensure that Canada continues to benefit from the social, economic and environmental goods and services derived from water resources. Experience and analysis suggests that policy and incentives play critical roles in the sustainable exploitation of natural resources. In particular, properly valuing water in all its forms and uses appears to be critical. Analysis abroad has underlined the benefits of clearly delineating the roles of regulators, resource managers, infrastructure operators and service...
Tipo: Report Palavras-chave: Water; Governance; Scarcity; Incentives; Sustainability; Valuation; Accountability; Transparency; Environmental Economics and Policy; Institutional and Behavioral Economics; International Relations/Trade; Resource /Energy Economics and Policy.
Ano: 2007 URL: http://purl.umn.edu/46689
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Aligning Key Concepts for Global Change Policy: Robustness, Resilience, and Sustainability Ecology and Society
Anderies, John M; Arizona State University; m.anderies@asu.edu; Folke, Carl; Beijer Institute for Ecological Economics; Stockholm Resilience Center, Stockholm University; carl.folke@beijer.kva.se; Walker, Brian; CSIRO Ecosystem Science; Brian.Walker@csiro.au; Ostrom, Elinor; Indiana University; ostrom@indiana.edu.
Globalization, the process by which local social-ecological systems (SESs) are becoming linked in a global network, presents policy scientists and practitioners with unique and difficult challenges. Although local SESs can be extremely complex, when they become more tightly linked in the global system, complexity increases very rapidly as multi-scale and multi-level processes become more important. Here, we argue that addressing these multi-scale and multi-level challenges requires a collection of theories and models. We suggest that the conceptual domains of sustainability, resilience, and robustness provide a sufficiently rich collection of theories and models, but overlapping definitions and confusion about how these conceptual domains articulate with...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Fragility; Global change; Governance; Institutions; Resilience; Robustness; Sustainability.
Ano: 2013
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Are good ideas enough?: The impact of socio-economic and regulatory factors on GMO commercialisation Biol. Res.
Vàzquez-Salat,Núria.
In recent years scientific literature has seen an increase in publications describing new transgenic applications. Although technically-sound, these promising developments might not necessarily translate into products available to the consumer. This article highlights the impact of external factors on the commercial viability of Genetically Modified (GM) animals in the pharmaceutical and food sectors. Through the division of the production chain into three Policy Domains -Science, Market and Public- I present an overview of the broad range of regulatory and socio-economic components that impacts on the path towards commercialisation of GM animals. To further illustrate the unique combination of forces that influence each application, I provide an in-depth...
Tipo: Journal article Palavras-chave: Genetically modified organisms; GM animals; Policy domains; Governance; Socio-economic factors.
Ano: 2013 URL: http://www.scielo.cl/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0716-97602013000400002
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Are We Entering an Era of Concatenated Global Crises? Ecology and Society
Biggs, Duan; ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University, Townsville Australia; ancientantwren@gmail.com; Biggs, Reinette (Oonsie); Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University, Sweden; oonsie.biggs@stockholmresilience.su.se; Dakos, Vasilis; Department of Aquatic Ecology & Water Quality Management, Wageningen University; vasileios.dakos@wur.nl; Scholes, Robert J; CSIR Natural Resources and the Environment, Pretoria, South Africa; BScholes@csir.co.za; Schoon, Michael; School of Human Evolution and Social Change, Arizona State University; Michael.Schoon@asu.edu.
An increase in the frequency and intensity of environmental crises associated with accelerating human-induced global change is of substantial concern to policy makers. The potential impacts, especially on the poor, are exacerbated in an increasingly connected world that enables the emergence of crises that are coupled in time and space. We discuss two factors that can interact to contribute to such an increased concatenation of crises: (1) the increasing strength of global vs. local drivers of change, so that changes become increasingly synchronized; and (2) unprecedented potential for the propagation of crises, and an enhanced risk of management interventions in one region becoming drivers elsewhere, because of increased connectivity. We discuss the...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Insight Palavras-chave: Concatenation; Connectivity; Crisis; Disaster; Food price crisis; Governance; Learning; Thresholds.
Ano: 2011
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Beyond Economic Instruments - Social Capital, Governance and Rural Institutional Innovation AgEcon
Murray, Catherine.
Economic instruments, or market based instruments try to bring market advantages to social dilemma situations, where private actions do not lead to socially optimal outcomes. Economic instruments try to redress such market failure. They try to create incentives for firms and individuals to act in the public interest. Such situations can be regarded as ‘social dilemma’. An alternative mechanism to solve social dilemma is to use cooperation amongst individuals, by facilitating and utilising social capital. The use of social capital is remains largely underexplored as a policy option, although this trend is changing, most notably in European rural development. Using evidence from research conducted on agricultural and rural institutions in central and Eastern...
Tipo: Conference Paper or Presentation Palavras-chave: Social capital; Institutions; Governance; Central and eastern Europe; Community/Rural/Urban Development; Environmental Economics and Policy; Political Economy.
Ano: 2008 URL: http://purl.umn.edu/96662
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Biodiversity governance and social-ecological system dynamics: transformation in the Australian Alps Ecology and Society
Lockwood, Michael; Geography and Environmental Studies, School of Land & Food, University of Tasmania; Michael.Lockwood@utas.edu.au; Mitchell, Michael; Geography and Environmental Studies, School of Land & Food, University of Tasmania; Michael.Mitchell@utas.edu.au; Moore, Susan A.; School of Veterinary and Life Sciences, Murdoch University ; S.Moore@murdoch.edu.au; Clement, Sarah; School of Veterinary and Life Sciences, Murdoch University ; S.Clement@murdoch.edu.au.
Biodiversity conservation continues to be a challenging task for societies worldwide. We undertook a resilience assessment to address the following question: What are the ramifications of social-ecological system dynamics for biodiversity governance of a nationally significant landscape? Resilience assessment offers promise for guiding response strategies, potentially enabling consideration of ecological, social, economic, and governance influences on biodiversity-related activities. Most resilience assessments have, however, struggled to effectively incorporate governance influences. We applied a modified version of the Resilience Alliance workbook approach to explicitly address governance influences at each stage of an assessment of internationally...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Adaptive cycle; Biodiversity; Climate change; Governance; Resilience assessment; Transformation.
Ano: 2014
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Bridging, Linking, and Bonding Social Capital in Collective Action: The Case of Kalahan Forest Reserve in the Philippines AgEcon
Dahal, Ganga Ram; Adhikari, Krishna Prasad.
This paper seeks to identify the factors which are responsible for successful management of natural resources when communities are given opportunities to manage those resources. Applying the social capital framework, it analyzes empirical data from the well known case of Kalahan Educational Foundation, the Philippines. The study confirms previous findings, which have emphasized the high level of cohesion and traditional norms among a homogeneous community of indigenous peoples (bonding social capital) as a success factor. This study further identifies that for effective management of collective action, mobilization of bridging and linking social capital are equally important as they do not only help mobilize external resources but, at times, also promote...
Tipo: Conference Paper or Presentation Palavras-chave: Kalahan PO; Philippines; Bonding; Bridging; Linking Social Capital; Governance; Collective Action; Labor and Human Capital; Resource /Energy Economics and Policy.
Ano: 2008 URL: http://purl.umn.edu/44352
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Can Co-Management Improve the Governance of A Common- Pool Resource? Lessons From A Framed Field Experiment in A Marine Protected Area in the Colombian Caribbean AgEcon
Moreno-Sanchez, Rocio del Pilar; Maldonado, Jorge Higinio.
Complexities associated with the management of common pool resources (CPR) threaten governance at some marine protected areas (MPA). In this paper, using economic experimental games (EEG), we investigate the effects of both external regulation and the complementarities between internal regulation and non-coercive authority intervention—what we call co-management—on fishermen’s extraction decisions. We perform EEG with fishermen inhabiting the influence zone of an MPA in the Colombian Caribbean. The results show that co- management exhibits the best results, both in terms of resource sustainability and reduction in extraction, highlighting the importance of strategies that recognize communities as key actors in the decision-making process for the...
Tipo: Working or Discussion Paper Palavras-chave: Common-pool resources; Governance; Co-management; Experimental economic games; Fisheries; Latin America.; Environmental Economics and Policy; C93; C72; D02; D70; Q01; Q22; Q28; C23; C25.
Ano: 2009 URL: http://purl.umn.edu/60731
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Can multicriteria assessment tools help build trust into organic products? Ecology and Society
Freyer, Bernhard; University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences (BOKU); bernhard.freyer@boku.ac.at; Bingen, Jim; Michigan State University, USA; bingen@msu.edu; Paxton, Rebecca; University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences (BOKU); Rebecca.Paxton@boku.ac.at.
In a continuously expanding, globalizing, and industrializing organic market, organic consumers confront increasing complexity in organic product representation, labeling, and information that challenges how they build trust in organic products. We present a conceptual framework to analyze how consumers might build and practice trust in the organic agrifood chain. We asked specifically about the role of multicriteria assessment tools (MCATs) for trust building. We identified three consumer trust types: uninformed trust in labels (type 1); informed trust in extensive information, control, and certification (type 2); and informed and engaged trust in forms of close farmer–consumer relationships (type 3). Three concepts of...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Insight Palavras-chave: Ethics; Governance; Multicriteria assessment tools; Organic farming; Reflexivity; Reflectivity; Systems thinking; Trust.
Ano: 2014
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Catalonian pork value chain’s resilience: ready for environmental challenge? AgEcon
Soldevila, Victoria; Viladomiu, Lourdes; Frances, Gemma.
The hog production model in Catalonia (Spain) has been, until recently, an example of success. Inventories and production have been increasing substantially and the sector has proven to have great export potential. Also, the Catalonian hog model has allowed the survival of crops and fruits’ small farms, through diversification with pork. Part of this success is based on the organizational system of the value chain or, as we call, “governance instruments” of the value chain. These “governance instruments” are, on one hand, contract relationships between agribusiness firms (specially, in feed sector) and farms and, on the other, a Marketing Board to fix pig prices (Mercolleida). However, recently, there have been some tensions in hog production model in...
Tipo: Conference Paper or Presentation Palavras-chave: Hog production model; Pork value chain; Governance; Critical Success Factor analysis; Environmental regulations.; Agricultural and Food Policy.
Ano: 2009 URL: http://purl.umn.edu/58134
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Centralized versus Individual: Governance of Farmer Professional Cooperatives in China AgEcon
Jia, Xiangping; Hu, Yamei; Hendrikse, George W.J.; Huang, Jikun.
Based on a national representative survey conducted in 2009, this study shows that the decision-making within Farmer Professional Cooperatives (FPCs) in China is decentralized to individual farmers. However, there is a trend that the decision rights of farming are decomposed to marketing, production and input procuring. While the rights for production and input procuring stay with family farmers, marketing rights tend to be collectivized. Compared to FPCs having external initiating sources, FPCs initiated by farmers are more inclined to introduce centralized decision-making. The governance structure of FPCs in transition China presents hybrid forms of both hierarchy and family farming.
Tipo: Conference Paper or Presentation Palavras-chave: Farmer; Cooperatives; Governance; China; Agricultural and Food Policy; Institutional and Behavioral Economics; Political Economy; L14; Q13; Q18.
Ano: 2010 URL: http://purl.umn.edu/90803
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