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Registros recuperados: 8
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Bushmeat networks link the forest to urban areas in the trifrontier region between Brazil, Colombia, and Peru Ecology and Society
van Vliet, Nathalie; Center for International Forestry Research; vanvlietnathalie@yahoo.com; Jonhson Neves de Aquino, Lindon; Universidade Federal do Amazonas; lj.aquino@bol.com.br; Schor, Tatiana; Geography Department, Federal University of Amazonas; NEPECAB; tatiana.schor@gmail.com; Hernandez, Sara; Independent Expert in Environmental Economics; sarah-hernandez-p@hotmail.com; Nasi, Robert; Center for International Forestry Research; r.nasi@cgiar.org.
Recent studies have intended to quantify urban consumption and trade in Amazonian towns. However, little is still known about the different ways in which bushmeat is made available in urban areas, including commercial and noncommercial flows, and how those flows contribute to link forests to urban livelihoods. In this study we qualitatively describe the structure and functioning of bushmeat flows in terms of species, catchment area, stakeholders involved, and the motivations for their activity in the main towns of the Amazon trifrontier region between Brazil, Colombia, and Peru. We show that bushmeat trade to urban areas exists under an organized but invisible commodity chain providing a source of income to about 195 persons. Bushmeat is made available...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Amazon; Bushmeat; Exchange networks; Indigenous people; Trade; Urban areas.
Ano: 2015
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Combining Science and Traditional Ecological Knowledge: Monitoring Populations for Co-Management Ecology and Society
Moller, Henrik; University of Otago; henrik.moller@stonebow.otago.ac.nz; Berkes, Fikret; University of Manitoba; berkes@cc.umanitoba.ca; Lyver, Philip O'Brian; University of Otago; LyverP@landcareresearch.co.nz; Kislalioglu, Mina; University of Manitoba; mberkes@mts.net.
Using a combination of traditional ecological knowledge and science to monitor populations can greatly assist co-management for sustainable customary wildlife harvests by indigenous peoples. Case studies from Canada and New Zealand emphasize that, although traditional monitoring methods may often be imprecise and qualitative, they are nevertheless valuable because they are based on observations over long time periods, incorporate large sample sizes, are inexpensive, invite the participation of harvesters as researchers, and sometimes incorporate subtle multivariate cross checks for environmental change. A few simple rules suggested by traditional knowledge may produce good management outcomes consistent with fuzzy logic thinking. Science can sometimes...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Adaptive management; Catch per unit effort; Community-based conservation; Customary harvesting; Indigenous people; Population monitoring; Sustainability; New Zealand; Canada.
Ano: 2004
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Developing Indicators for Monitoring and Evaluating Joint Management Effectiveness in Protected Areas in the Northern Territory, Australia Ecology and Society
Izurieta, Arturo; Research Institute for Environment and Livelihoods, Charles Darwin University; arturo_izurieta@hotmail.com; Sithole, Bevlyne; Research Institute for Environment and Livelihoods, Charles Darwin University;; Stacey, Natasha; Research Institute for Environment and Livelihoods, Charles Darwin University; natasha.stacey@cdu.edu.au; Hunter-Xenie, Hmalan; Research Institute for Environment and Livelihoods, Charles Darwin University;; Campbell, Bruce; Research Institute for Environment and Livelihoods, Charles Darwin University;; Donohoe, Paul; Northern Land Council;; Brown, Jessie; Wardaman Traditional Owner;; Wilson, Lincoln; Department of Natural Resources, Environment, The Arts and Sport/NT Parks and Wildlife Service;.
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Adaptive management; Evaluation; Indigenous people; Joint management; Management effectiveness; Monitoring; Participation; Partnership; Protected areas.
Ano: 2011
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Dynamics of the botanical knowledge of the Laklãnõ-Xokleng indigenous people in Southern Brazil Acta Botanica
Heineberg,Marian Ruth; Hanazaki,Natalia.
ABSTRACT We analyzed the botanical knowledge of the Laklãnõ-Xokleng people in the Ibirama Laklãnõ Indigenous Territory. They are the last remnant of this ethnicity living in a unitary socio-political organization. The objective was to investigate the dynamics, distribution and transmission of botanical information. We interviewed 112 people in two villages about known and used plants. Data were collected through structured socioeconomic questionnaires, free lists and walk-in-the-woods tours. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and metrics of social network analysis. Of the 314 plants mentioned in the interviews, 77 % were currently used, 15 % were used in the past, and 8 % were known but never used. Men cited more plants than women. We found no...
Tipo: Info:eu-repo/semantics/article Palavras-chave: Cultural transmission; Indigenous people; Knowledge distribution; Laklãnõ; Plant knowledge dynamics; Social network analysis; Xokleng.
Ano: 2019 URL: http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0102-33062019000200254
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Dynamics of the botanical knowledge of the Laklãnõ-Xokleng indigenous people in Southern Brazil Acta Botanica
Heineberg,Marian Ruth; Hanazaki,Natalia.
ABSTRACT We analyzed the botanical knowledge of the Laklãnõ-Xokleng people in the Ibirama Laklãnõ Indigenous Territory. They are the last remnant of this ethnicity living in a unitary socio-political organization. The objective was to investigate the dynamics, distribution and transmission of botanical information. We interviewed 112 people in two villages about known and used plants. Data were collected through structured socioeconomic questionnaires, free lists and walk-in-the-woods tours. Data were analyzed using descriptive statistics and metrics of social network analysis. Of the 314 plants mentioned in the interviews, 77 % were currently used, 15 % were used in the past, and 8 % were known but never used. Men cited more plants than women. We found no...
Tipo: Info:eu-repo/semantics/article Palavras-chave: Cultural transmission; Indigenous people; Knowledge distribution; Laklãnõ; Plant knowledge dynamics; Social network analysis; Xokleng.
Ano: 2019 URL: http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0102-33062019005003102
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Empowering Local People through Community-based Resource Monitoring: a Comparison of Brazil and Namibia Ecology and Society
Rostant, Luke; University of the West Indies; lrostant@gmail.com; Marinelli, Carlos Eduardo; Instituto Socioambiental; caemari@gmail.com.
Biological resource monitoring systems are implemented in many countries and often depend on the participation of local people. It has been suggested that these systems empower local participants while promoting conservation. We reviewed three wildlife monitoring systems in indigenous lands and sustainable development reserves in Brazilian Amazonia and one in Namibian Caprivi conservancies, analyzing the strategies adopted and conditions that facilitated local empowerment, as well as potential impacts on conservation. This provided insights into potential avenues to strengthen empowerment outcomes of monitoring systems in Latin America and Africa. We assessed four dimensions of empowerment at individual and community scales: psychological, social,...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Acre; Amazô Nas; Caprivi; Community participation; Decentralization; Indigenous people; Protected area; Wildlife management.
Ano: 2012
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Pharmaceutical ethnobotany in the Mahabad (West Azerbaijan) biosphere reserve: ethno-pharmaceutical formulations, nutraceutical uses and quantitative aspects BJPS
Jafarirad,Saeed; Rasoulpour,Ibrahim.
This study endeavors to overcome the limits of an orally transmitted pharmacopoeia, and tries to utilize the large ethnobotany patrimony of the area to investigate the biological diversity. Thirty-five traditional practitioners from dissimilar ethnic groups including traditional health practitioners (THPs) and indigenous people were interviewed. A total of 35 species of plants, belonging to 20 families were recognized for the treatment of more than 26 types of ailments. Informant consensus factor (FIC) values of this study reflected the high agreement in the use of plants in the treatment of gastro-intestinal complaints, infectious, parasitic diseases and constipation among the informants. Constipation had the highest use-reports and 8 species of plants...
Tipo: Info:eu-repo/semantics/article Palavras-chave: Pharmaceutical Ethnobotany; Ethno-Medicinal Knowledge; Indigenous people; Nutraceutical aspects; Ethnobotany/trends; Biosphere/analysis; Medicine tradicional/utilization; Ethnopharmacology; Plants/drug effects; Phytochemicals/pharmacology.
Ano: 2019 URL: http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S1984-82502019000100501
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The Value of Tropical Forest to Local Communities: Complications, Caveats, and Cautions Ecology and Society
Sheil, Douglas; CIFOR (Center for International Forestry Research); d.sheil@cgiar.org; Wunder, Sven; CIFOR (Center for International Forestry Research); S.Wunder@cgiar.org.
The methods used to value tropical forests have the potential to influence how policy makers and others perceive forest lands. A small number of valuation studies achieve real impact. These are generally succinct accounts supporting a specific perception. However, such reports risk being used to justify inappropriate actions. The end users of such results are rarely those who produced them, and misunderstanding of key details is a concern. One defense is to ensure that shortcomings and common pitfalls are better appreciated by the ultimate users. In this article, we aim to reduce such risks by discussing how valuation studies should be assessed and challenged by users. We consider two concise, high-profile valuation papers here, by Peters and colleagues...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Cultural anthropology; Forest valuation; Indigenous people; Land-use change; Livelihood security; Local participation; Measurement biases; Nontimber forest products; Policy priorities; Tropical deforestation; Unit-area values; Unit-time values.
Ano: 2002
Registros recuperados: 8
Primeira ... 1 ... Última
 

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