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Registros recuperados: 24
Primeira ... 12 ... Última
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Can Local Ecological Knowledge Contribute to Wildlife Management? Case Studies of Migratory Birds Ecology and Society
Gilchrist, Grant; ; grant.gilchrist@ec.gc.ca; Mallory, Mark; ; mark.mallory@ec.gc.ca; Merkel, Flemming; ;.
Sound management of wildlife species, particularly those that are harvested, requires extensive information on their natural history and demography. For many global wildlife populations, however, insufficient scientific information exists, and alternative data sources may need to be considered in management decisions. In some circumstances, local ecological knowledge (LEK) can serve as a useful, complementary data source, and may be particularly valuable when managing wildlife populations that occur in remote locations inhabited by indigenous peoples. Although several published papers discuss the general benefits of LEK, few attempt to examine the reliability of information generated through this approach. We review four case studies of marine birds in...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Arctic; Inuit; LEK; Local ecological knowledge; Marine birds; Population declines; TEK; Traditional ecological knowledge.
Ano: 2005
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Community-Based Conservation and Traditional Ecological Knowledge: Implications for Social-Ecological Resilience Ecology and Society
Our review highlights how traditional ecological knowledge influences people's adaptive capacity to social-ecological change and identifies a set of mechanisms that contribute to such capacity in the context of community-based biodiversity conservation initiatives. Twenty-three publications, including twenty-nine case studies, were reviewed with the aim of investigating how local knowledge, community-based conservation, and resilience interrelate in social-ecological systems. We highlight that such relationships have not been systematically addressed in regions where a great number of community conservation initiatives are found; and we identify a set of factors that foster people's adaptive capacity to social-ecological change and a number of social...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Adaptive capacity; Biodiversity conservation; Community-based conservation; Ecosystem services; Local ecological knowledge; Natural resource management; Social-ecological change; Social-ecological resilience; Traditional ecological knowledge.
Ano: 2013
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Comparing Expert-Based Science With Local Ecological Knowledge: What Are We Afraid Of? Ecology and Society
Gilchrist, Grant; Canadian Wildlife Service National Wildlife Research Centre. 1125 Colonel By Drive, Raven Road, Carleton University. Ottawa, Canada. K1A 0H3; grant.gilchrist@ec.gc.ca; Mallory, Mark L; Canadian Wildlife Service; mark.mallory@ec.gc.ca.
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Response Palavras-chave: Arctic; Ecological science; LEK; Local ecological knowledge; Wildlife management..
Ano: 2007
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Consilient knowledge in fisheries: a case study of three species of wolffish (Anarhichadidae) listed under the Canadian Species at Risk Act Ecology and Society
Dawe, Jennifer; Memorial University of Newfoundland and Labrador; jennifer.dawe@gmail.com; Schneider, David; Memorial University of Newfoundland and Labrador; David.Schneider@mun.ca.
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed article Palavras-chave: Bycatch; Fishery surveys; Local ecological knowledge; Species at risk; Wolffish.
Ano: 2014
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Ecosystem and Social Construction: an Interdisciplinary Case Study of the Shurkul Lake Landscape in Khorezm, Uzbekistan. Ecology and Society
Shanafield, Margaret; National Centre for Groundwater Resarch and Training, Flinders University; mshanafield@yahoo.com; Ismailova, Bashorat; ZEF/UNESCO Khorezm Project; bashorat.ismailova@gmail.com; Saito, Laurel; University of Nevada Reno; lsaito@cabnr.unr.edu.
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Connectedness to nature; Central Asia; Lake ecosystem; Landscape; Local ecological knowledge; Perception; Shurkul lake; Social construction.
Ano: 2011
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Expert and Generalist Local Knowledge about Land-cover Change on South Africa’s Wild Coast: Can Local Ecological Knowledge Add Value to Science? Ecology and Society
Chalmers, Nigel; Rhodes University, South Africa;; Fabricius, Christo; Rhodes University, South Africa; c.fabricius@ru.ac.za.
Local ecological knowledge (LEK) can shed light on ecosystem change, especially in under-researched areas such as South Africa’s Wild Coast. However, for ecosystem planning purposes, it is necessary to assess the accuracy and validity of LEK, and determine where such knowledge is situated in a community, and how evenly it is spread. Furthermore, it is relevant to ask: does LEK add value to science, and how do science and local knowledge complement one another? We assessed change in woodland and forest cover in the Nqabara Administrative Area on South Africa’s Wild Coast between 1974 and 2001. The inhabitants of Nqabara are “traditional” Xhosa-speaking people who are highly dependent on natural resources for their...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Cultivation; Fire; GIS; Land-cover change; Landscape ecology; Local ecological knowledge; Politics; Scientific knowledge; Vegetation.
Ano: 2007
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Grazing game: a learning tool for adaptive management in response to climate variability in semiarid areas of Ghana Ecology and Society
Villamor, Grace B; Department of Ecology and Natural Resources Management, Center for Development Research, University of Bonn; gracev@uni-bonn.de; Badmos, Biola K; Kwara State University, Malete, Nigeria; biolakz@yahoo.com.
In West Africa, the most extreme predicted effects of climate change are expected to occur in desert and grassland areas. It is crucial for local populations in this region to better understand what such projections signify to them to identify sound adaptation policies and interventions. We developed a game, called the “grazing game,” and conducted trials with local farmers at multiple study sites as a learning tool to better understand their behavior in response to climate variability under semiarid conditions in West Africa and to facilitate social learning. The grazing game was designed to reveal the processes that lead to overgrazing and desertification based on the players’ interactions with environmental conditions and...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Anticipatory learning; Coping strategies; Dry lands; Local ecological knowledge; Overgrazing; Rainfall fluctuations; Role-playing games.
Ano: 2016
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How accurate is the local ecological knowledge of protected area practitioners? Ecology and Society
Cook, Carly N.; University of Melbourne; University of Queensland; carly.cook@unimelb.edu.au; Wardell-Johnson, Grant; Curtin University; G.Wardell-Johnson@curtin.edu.au; Carter, R. W.; University of the Sunshine Coast; Bcarter@usc.edu.au; Hockings, Marc; University of Queensland; m.hockings@uq.edu.au.
The scarcity of environmental data means that other sources of information are needed to complement empirical evidence for conservation decisions. By regularly interacting with their local environment, protected area practitioners may generate local ecological knowledge (LEK) that can be used to inform management decisions. However, the accuracy of LEK is generally poorly understood, and no studies have assessed the accuracy of practitioners’ personal knowledge, leading to a vital gap in our ability to best use this information to guide management. We measured the accuracy of practitioners’ knowledge of the vegetation condition within protected areas, relative to an empirical vegetation condition assessment tool. Despite the vast...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Conservation decisions; Environmental management; Evaluation; Local ecological knowledge; Vegetation condition.
Ano: 2014
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Integrating local pastoral knowledge, participatory mapping, and species distribution modeling for risk assessment of invasive rubber vine (Cryptostegia grandiflora) in Ethiopia’s Afar region Ecology and Society
Luizza, Matthew W.; Colorado State University, Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory; mwluizza@rams.colostate.edu; Wakie, Tewodros; Colorado State University, Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory; tewodros.wakie@colostate.edu; Evangelista, Paul H.; Colorado State University, Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory; paul.evangelista@colostate.edu; Jarnevich, Catherine S.; U.S. Geological Survey, Fort Collins Science Center; jarnevichc@usgs.gov.
The threats posed by invasive plants span ecosystems and economies worldwide. Local knowledge of biological invasions has proven beneficial for invasive species research, but to date no work has integrated this knowledge with species distribution modeling for invasion risk assessments. In this study, we integrated pastoral knowledge with Maxent modeling to assess the suitable habitat and potential impacts of invasive Cryptostegia grandiflora Robx. Ex R.Br. (rubber vine) in Ethiopia’s Afar region. We conducted focus groups with seven villages across the Amibara and Awash-Fentale districts. Pastoral knowledge revealed the growing threat of rubber vine, which to date has received limited attention in Ethiopia, and whose presence in Afar was...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Afar region; Citizen science; Cryptostegia grandiflora; Ethiopia; Invasive species; Local ecological knowledge; Maxent; Participatory mapping; Pastoral livelihoods; Risk assessment; Rubber vine; Species distribution modeling.
Ano: 2016
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Integrating Traditional and Evolutionary Knowledge in Biodiversity Conservation: a Population Level Case Study Ecology and Society
Fraser, Dylan J; Department of Biology, Dalhousie University; dylan.fraser@dal.ca; Coon, Thomas; Cree Trapper's Association; tourism@nation.mistissini.qc.ca; Prince, Michael R.; Cree Nation of Mistissini, Quebec; tourism@nation.mistissini.qc.ca; Dion, Rene; Grand Council of the Crees of Quebec; rdion@gcc.ca; Bernatchez, Louis; Department of Biology, Laval University; louis.bernatchez@bio.ulaval.ca.
Despite their dual importance in the assessment of endangered/threatened species, there have been few attempts to integrate traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) and evolutionary biology knowledge (EBK) at the population level. We contrasted long-term aboriginal TEK with previously obtained EBK in the context of seasonal migratory habits and population biology of a salmonid fish, brook charr, (Salvelinus fontinalis) inhabiting a large, remote postglacial lake. Compilation of TEK spanning four decades involved analytical workshops, semidirective interviews, and collaborative fieldwork with local aboriginal informants and fishing guides. We found that TEK complemented EBK of brook charr by providing concordant and additional information about (1) population...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Biodiversity; Conservation; Cree; Evolutionary biology; Fish; James Bay; Local ecological knowledge; Migration; Northern research; Traditional ecological knowledge; Traditional knowledge..
Ano: 2006
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Integrating Traditional Ecological Knowledge and Ecological Science: a Question of Scale Ecology and Society
The benefits and challenges of integrating traditional ecological knowledge and scientific knowledge have led to extensive discussions over the past decades, but much work is still needed to facilitate the articulation and co-application of these two types of knowledge. Through two case studies, we examined the integration of traditional ecological knowledge and scientific knowledge by emphasizing their complementarity across spatial and temporal scales. We expected that combining Inuit traditional ecological knowledge and scientific knowledge would expand the spatial and temporal scales of currently documented knowledge on the arctic fox (Vulpes lagopus) and the greater snow goose (Chen caerulescens atlantica), two important tundra species. Using...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Arctic; Inuit; Protected area; Scale; Chen caerulescens atlantica; Traditional ecological knowledge; Vulpes lagopus; Alopex lagopus; Local ecological knowledge; Scientific knowledge.
Ano: 2009
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Integration of Local Ecological Knowledge and Conventional Science: a Study of Seven Community-Based Forestry Organizations in the USA Ecology and Society
Ballard, Heidi L; University of California - Davis; hballard@ucdavis.edu; Fernandez-Gimenez, Maria E; Colorado State University; gimenez@warnercnr.colostate.edu; Sturtevant, Victoria E; Southern Oregon University; sturtevant@sou.edu.
Natural resource management decisions can be based on incomplete knowledge when they lack scientific research, monitoring, and assessment and/or simultaneously fail to draw on local ecological knowledge. Many community-based forestry organizations in the United States attempt to address these knowledge gaps with an integrated ecological stewardship approach that balances ecological, social, and economic goals. This paper examines the use and integration of local knowledge and conventional science in ecological stewardship and monitoring by seven community-based forestry demonstration projects. Through document reviews and interviews with both participants and partners of all of these community-based organizations, we found that all the community-based...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Civic science; Community-based forestry; Community-based natural resource management; Conventional science; Ecological assessment; Ecological monitoring; Local ecological knowledge; Scientific knowledge.
Ano: 2008
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Local knowledge production, transmission, and the importance of village leaders in a network of Tibetan pastoralists coping with environmental change Ecology and Society
Hopping, Kelly A.; Graduate Degree Program in Ecology, Colorado State University; Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory, Colorado State University; khopping@stanford.edu; Yangzong, Ciren; Geography Department, Tibet University; ciy022@hotmail.com; Klein, Julia A.; Graduate Degree Program in Ecology, Colorado State University; Natural Resource Ecology Laboratory, Colorado State University; Department of Ecosystem Science and Sustainability, Colorado State University; julia.klein@colostate.edu.
Changing climate, social institutions, and natural resource management policies are reshaping the dynamics of social-ecological systems globally, with subsistence-based communities likely to be among the most vulnerable to the impacts of global change. These communities’ local ecological knowledge is increasingly recognized as a source of adaptive capacity for them as well as a crucial source of information to be incorporated into scientific understanding and policy making. We interviewed Tibetan pastoralists about their observations of environmental changes, their interpretations of the causes of these changes, and the ways in which they acquire and transmit this knowledge. We found that community members tended to agree that changing climate is...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Cultural consensus analysis global change; Local ecological knowledge; Pastoralism; Social networks; Tibetan Plateau.
Ano: 2016
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Local Management Practices for Dealing with Change and Uncertainty: A Cross-scale Comparison of Cases in Sweden and Tanzania Ecology and Society
Belfrage, Kristina; Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences; Kristina.Belfrage@lbutv.slu.se.
We investigated and compared management practices for dealing with uncertainty in agroecosystem dynamics in two cases of smallholder farming in different parts of the world: northeast Tanzania and east-central Sweden. Qualitative research methods were applied to map farmers' practices related to agroecosystem management. The practices are clustered according to a framework of ecosystem services relevant for agricultural production and discussed using a theoretical model of ecosystem dynamics. Almost half of the identified practices were found to be similar in both cases, with similar approaches for adjusting to and dealing with local variability and disturbance. Practices that embraced the ecological roles of wild as well as domesticated flora and fauna...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Mbulu highlands; Roslagen; Sweden; Tanzania; Agroecosystem; Biodiversity; Bioindicators; Local ecological knowledge; Management practices; Resilience; Traditional ecological knowledge.
Ano: 2004
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Many Eyes on Nature: Diverse Perspectives in the Cape Horn Biosphere Reserve and Their Relevance for Conservation Ecology and Society
Berghoefer, Uta; Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ; uta.berghoefer@gmx.de; Rozzi, Ricardo; University of North Texas; Universidad de Magallanes (Chile); rozzi@unt.edu; Jax, Kurt; Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ; kurt.jax@ufz.de.
Relationships between humans and nature take multiple forms. This is a fundamental issue in conservation but one that is often neglected, leading to poor conservation outcomes. It is thus imperative that we come to understand better the complex relationships between humans and nature. To do so, we need to examine “nature” and the often assumed dichotomy between humans and nature. We conducted a qualitative social research inquiry to explore the societal relationships with nature in the Cape Horn Biosphere Reserve in Chile. From the results, we developed a framework that illustrates how different “natures” are created in the three-way relationship among the individual, society, and the physical world. We further...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Biodiversity; Biosphere reserve; Chile; Conflicts; Conservation; Local ecological knowledge; Participation; Protected areas; Valuation.
Ano: 2010
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Market integration does not affect traditional ecological knowledge but contributes additional pressure on plant resources Acta Botanica
Silva,Temóteo Luiz Lima da; Campos,Juliana Loureiro de Almeida; Alves,Ângelo Giuseppe Chaves; Albuquerque,Ulysses Paulino.
ABSTRACT Market integration can affect the manner in which individuals learn about and use natural resources. The present study explores the influence of market integration on the traditional ecological knowledge (TEK) and use of natural resources in handicraft production among the Fulni-ô indigenous people of Northeast Brazil. We collect data from 67 artisans about their traditional and non-traditional handicrafts, which are mainly produced for external trade demand (our proxy for market integration). Data regarding the distribution of knowledge among different segments of the population, according to socioeconomic variables, and the comparison of plant biomass used for traditional and non-traditional handicrafts, reveals that integration does not affect...
Tipo: Info:eu-repo/semantics/article Palavras-chave: Biodiversity conservation; Cultural changes; Handicrafts; Indians; Local ecological knowledge; Market participation.
Ano: 2019 URL: http://www.scielo.br/scielo.php?script=sci_arttext&pid=S0102-33062019000200232
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On Using Expert-Based Science to “Test” Local Ecological Knowledge Ecology and Society
Brook, Ryan K; University of Manitoba; ryan_brook@umanitoba.ca.
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Response Palavras-chave: Arctic; Empowerment; Expert-based science; Local ecological knowledge; Wildlife management.
Ano: 2005
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Perception-based Methods to Evaluate Conservation Impact in Forests Managed Through Popular Participation Ecology and Society
Lund, Jens F; University of Copenhagen; jens@life.ku.dk; Balooni, Kulbhushan; Indian Institute of Management Kozhikode; kbalooni@yahoo.com; Puri, Lila; Institute of Forestry, Tribhuvan University; lpu@life.ku.dk.
We reviewed construct validity in perception-based methods assessing status and/or trend of forest condition as applied in 19 empirical studies that evaluated the conservation impact of popular participation in forest management. Perception-based methods focus on eliciting peoples’ assessment of the status and/or trend in forest condition or indicators of forest condition through interviews, surveys, or participatory rural appraisal techniques. We found that individual studies generally did not attend to the issue of construct validity in relation to each particular approach to perception-based assessment of status and/or trend in forest condition. Furthermore, the studies provided very little documentation of the construct validity of the...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Conservation; Forest; Impact; Local ecological knowledge; Validity.
Ano: 2010
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Power Asymmetries in Small-Scale Fisheries: a Barrier to Governance Transformability? Ecology and Society
Crona, Beatrice; Stockholm Resilience Center, Stockholm University, Sweden; beatrice.crona@stockholmresilience.su.se.
Both global and local environmental problems call for the transformation of many contemporary and unsustainable governance approaches. Therefore, recent interest has sprung up around factors that facilitate and hinder societies from transforming governance of natural resources. Using a social-network approach, we study links between informal power structures and knowledge sharing and consensus building. We examine how this interaction may have affected the (in)ability of a community to move from open-access to some form of collective action for resource management. Individuals occupying central positions in a knowledge network can be instrumental in determining which knowledge and interpretation of ecological signals is most dominant. If the same...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Comanagement; Governance; Local ecological knowledge; Natural resources; Power; Social networks; Transformation.
Ano: 2010
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Social-Ecological Guilds: Putting People into Marine Historical Ecology Ecology and Society
Shackeroff, Janna M; International Coordinator NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program ; janna.shackeroff@noaa.gov; Campbell, Lisa M; Duke University; lcampbe@duke.edu; Crowder, Larry B; Duke University Marine Laboratory; lcrowder@duke.edu.
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Conservation; Coral reefs; Local ecological knowledge; Marine historical ecology; Social-ecological systems; Traditional ecological knowledge.
Ano: 2011
Registros recuperados: 24
Primeira ... 12 ... Última
 

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