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Registros recuperados: 6
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Design considerations for community-based stream monitoring to detect changes in Pacific salmon habitats Ecology and Society
Lagasse, Cory R.; School of Resource and Environmental Management, Simon Fraser University; clagasse@sfu.ca; Ou, Wanli; School of Resource and Environmental Management, Simon Fraser University; wanli_ou@sfu.ca; Honka, Leah D.; School of Resource and Environmental Management, Simon Fraser University; lhonka@sfu.ca; Atlas, William I.; Qqs Projects Society; salmon@qqsprojects.org; Hutton, Claire N.; Independent Resource Management Consultant; TNC Canada; chutton@tnc.org; Kotaska, Jana; Institute for Resources, Environment and Sustainability, University of British Columbia; jkotaska@icloud.com; Hocking, Morgan D.; Hakai Network for Coastal People, Ecosystems and Management, Simon Fraser University; School of Environmental Studies, University of Victoria; morganhocking@gmail.com.
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Adaptive governance; Ecosystem-based management; First Nations management; Great Bear Rainforest; Pacific salmon; Power analysis; Stream monitoring.
Ano: 2014
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Evolutionary History, Habitat Disturbance Regimes, and Anthropogenic Changes: What Do These Mean for Resilience of Pacific Salmon Populations? Ecology and Society
Waples, Robin S.; NOAA Fisheries Northwest Fisheries Science Center; robin.waples@noaa.gov; Beechie, Tim; NOAA Fisheries, Northwest Fisheries Science Center Environmental Conservation Division; Tim.Beechie@noaa.gov; Pess, George R.; NOAA Fisheries, Northwest Fisheries Science Center Environmental Conservation Division; George.Pess@noaa.gov.
Because resilience of a biological system is a product of its evolutionary history, the historical template that describes the relationships between species and their dynamic habitats is an important point of reference. Habitats used by Pacific salmon have been quite variable throughout their evolutionary history, and these habitats can be characterized by four key attributes of disturbance regimes: frequency, magnitude, duration, and predictability. Over the past two centuries, major anthropogenic changes to salmon ecosystems have dramatically altered disturbance regimes that the species experience. To the extent that these disturbance regimes assume characteristics outside the range of the historical template, resilience of salmon populations might be...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Synthesis Palavras-chave: Climate change; Duration; Frequency; Historical template; Magnitude; Pacific Northwest; Oncorhynchus; Pacific salmon; Predictability..
Ano: 2009
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Freshwater Ecosystems and Resilience of Pacific Salmon: Habitat Management Based on Natural Variability Ecology and Society
Bisson, Peter A; U.S. Forest Service; pbisson@fs.fed.us; Dunham, Jason B; U.S. Geological Survey; jdunham@usgs.gov; Reeves, Gordon H; U.S. Forest Service; greeves@fs.fed.us.
In spite of numerous habitat restoration programs in fresh waters with an aggregate annual funding of millions of dollars, many populations of Pacific salmon remain significantly imperiled. Habitat restoration strategies that address limited environmental attributes and partial salmon life-history requirements or approaches that attempt to force aquatic habitat to conform to idealized but ecologically unsustainable conditions may partly explain this lack of response. Natural watershed processes generate highly variable environmental conditions and population responses, i.e., multiple life histories, that are often not considered in restoration. Examples from several locations underscore the importance of natural variability to the resilience of Pacific...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed article Palavras-chave: Pacific salmon; Habitat restoration; Watershed processes; Natural variation.
Ano: 2009
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Merits and Limits of Ecosystem Protection for Conserving Wild Salmon in a Northern Coastal British Columbia River Ecology and Society
Hill, Aaron C.; Watershed Watch Salmon Society; Flathead Lake Biological Station, University of Montana; hillfish@telus.net; Bansak, Thomas S.; Flathead Lake Biological Station, University of Montana; tom.bansak@umontana.edu; Ellis, Bonnie K.; Flathead Lake Biological Station, University of Montana; bonnie.ellis@umontana.edu; Stanford, Jack A.; Flathead Lake Biological Station, University of Montana; jack.stanford@umontana.edu.
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Conservation; Ecology; Fisheries management; Habitat; Kitlope River; Pacific salmon; Resilience; Salmon stronghold.
Ano: 2010
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Reconnecting Social and Ecological Resilience in Salmon Ecosystems Ecology and Society
Bottom, Daniel L.; NOAA Fisheries, Northwest Fisheries Science Center; Dan.Bottom@noaa.gov; Jones, Kim K.; Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife; kim.jones@oregonstate.edu; Simenstad, Charles A; University of Washington; simenstd@u.washington.edu; Smith, Courtland L; Department of Anthropology, Oregon State University; csmith@oregonstate.edu.
Fishery management programs designed to control Pacific salmon (Oncorhynchus spp.) for optimum production have failed to prevent widespread fish population decline and have caused greater uncertainty for salmon, their ecosystems, and the people who depend upon them. In this special feature introduction, we explore several key attributes of ecosystem resilience that have been overlooked by traditional salmon management approaches. The dynamics of salmon ecosystems involve social–ecological interactions across multiple scales that create difficult mismatches with the many jurisdictions that manage fisheries and other natural resources. Of particular importance to ecosystem resilience are large-scale shifts in oceanic and climatic regimes or in...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed article Palavras-chave: Fishery management; Pacific Northwest; Pacific salmon; Resilience; Salmon ecosystem.
Ano: 2009
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Resilient Salmon, Resilient Fisheries for British Columbia, Canada Ecology and Society
Healey, Michael C; University of British Columbia; CALFED Bay-Delta Program; healey@interchange.ubc.ca.
Salmon are inherently resilient species. However, this resiliency has been undermined in British Columbia by a century of centralized, command-and-control management focused initially on maximizing yield and, more recently, on economic efficiency. Community and cultural resiliency have also been undermined, especially by the recent emphasis on economic efficiency, which has concentrated access in the hands of a few and has disenfranchised fishery-dependent communities. Recent declines in both salmon stocks and salmon prices have revealed the systemic failure of the current management system. If salmon and their fisheries are to become viable again, radically new management policies are needed. For the salmon species, the emphasis must shift from maximizing...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Synthesis Palavras-chave: Fishery management; Pacific salmon; Resilience; Sustainable fisheries.
Ano: 2009
Registros recuperados: 6
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