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A boundary-spanning organization for transdisciplinary science on land stewardship: The Stewardship Network Ecology and Society
Fischer, A. Paige; School of Natural Resources and Environment, University of Michigan; apfisch@umich.edu.
Although people and organizations in the Great Lakes region, USA take seriously their role as stewards of natural resources, many lack capacity to fulfill that role in a meaningful way. Stepping into that gap, The Stewardship Network (TSN) envisions “a world of empowered, connected communities caring for land and water, now and forever,” and fulfills that vision through its mission to “connect, equip, and mobilize people and organizations to care for land and water in their communities.” TSN uses a scalable model of linked local and regional capacity building, science communication, civic engagement, and on-the-ground stewardship activities to achieve these goals. The model engages local and regional groups in an...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed article Palavras-chave: Great Lakes; Restoration; Social learning; Stewardship.
Ano: 2015
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A Critical Systems Approach to Social Learning: Building Adaptive Capacity in Social, Ecological, Epistemological (SEE) Systems Ecology and Society
McCarthy, Daniel D. P.; Waterloo Institute for Social innovation and Resilience (WISIR) University of Waterloo; dmccarth@uwaterloo.ca; Crandall, Debbe D.; Save the Oak Ridges Moraine Coalition; dcrandall@stormcoalition.org; Whitelaw, Graham S.; Queen's University; graham.whitelaw@queenu.ca; General, Zachariah; University of Waterloo; zachgeneral@gmail.com; Tsuji, Leonard J. S.; University of Waterloo; ljtsuji@uwaterloo.ca.
This paper presents a conceptual tool, or heuristic, for describing the epistemological context for social learning within complex social–ecological systems. The heuristic integrates several definitions of social learning that emphasize the importance of critical reflection and its collaborative nature and that it is rooted in and oriented toward practice through social interactions. The conceptual tool is useful in identifying and conceptually mapping different perspectives based on types of learning described along three dimensions: typology of knowledge; different levels of critical reflection; and scale. The heuristic was originally developed in the context of an environmental planning process in southern Ontario, Canada, and is applied to...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Adaptive capacity; Critical systems thinking; First Nations; Social learning.
Ano: 2011
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Adaptive Management and Social Learning in Collaborative and Community-Based Monitoring: a Study of Five Community-Based Forestry Organizations in the western USA Ecology and Society
Fernandez-Gimenez, Maria E.; Colorado State University; gimenez@warnercnr.colostate.edu; Ballard, Heidi L.; University of California - Davis; hballard@ucdavis.edu; Sturtevant, Victoria E.; Southern Oregon University; sturtevant@sou.edu.
Collaborative and community-based monitoring are becoming more frequent, yet few studies have examined the process and outcomes of these monitoring approaches. We studied 18 collaborative or community-based ecological assessment or monitoring projects undertaken by five community-based forestry organizations (CBFs), to investigate the objectives, process, and outcomes of collaborative ecological monitoring by CBF organizations. We found that collaborative monitoring can lead to shared ecological understanding among diverse participants, build trust internally and credibility externally, foster social learning and community-building, and advance adaptive management. The CBFs experienced challenges in recruiting and sustaining community participation in...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Adaptive management; Collaborative monitoring; Multiparty monitoring; Community-based monitoring; Resilience; Social-ecological systems; Social learning.
Ano: 2008
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Building Criminal Capital Behind Bars: Social Learning in Juvenile Corrections AgEcon
Bayer, Patrick; Pintoff, Randi; Pozen, David E..
This paper analyzes the influence that juvenile offenders serving time in the same correctional facility have on each other’s subsequent criminal behavior. The analysis is based on data on over 8,000 individuals serving time in 169 juvenile correctional facilities during a two-year period in Florida. These data provide a complete record of past crimes, facility assignments, and arrests and adjudications in the year following release for each individual. To control for the non-random assignment of juveniles to facilities, we include facility fixed effects in the analysis. This ensures that the impact of peers on recidivism is identified using only the variation in the length of time that any two individuals serving a sentence in the same facility happen to...
Tipo: Working or Discussion Paper Palavras-chave: Social learning; Peer effects; Social interactions; Recidivism; Juvenile crime; Human capital accumulation; Labor and Human Capital; H0; J0; J2; K1.
Ano: 2003 URL: http://purl.umn.edu/28511
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Credit Accessibility, Risk Attitude, and Social Learning: Investment Decisions of Aquaculture in Rural Indonesia AgEcon
Miyata, Sachiko; Sawada, Yasuyuki.
This study examines the factors that influenced poor Indonesian farmers to invest in floating net aquaculture after being relocated due to a reservoir construction project. To compare three primary decision factors, credit accessibility, risk attitudes, and social learning, (i.e., learning effects from others’ experience), we analyze 16 years of socio-economic retrospective data collected in the field interviews exclusively for this study. Our analysis reveals that credit accessibility and risk attitudes are the most important factors that influence the rate of aquaculture investment. Social learning as well as household education also influences the investment decision significantly. Our results suggest that developmen t projects that involve voluntary...
Tipo: Conference Paper or Presentation Palavras-chave: Household investment decision; Credit constraints; Risk attitudes; Social learning; Panel data; Farm Management; D1; D8; D12; Q22.
Ano: 2006 URL: http://purl.umn.edu/25669
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Does Participatory Planning Foster the Transformation Toward More Adaptive Social-Ecological Systems? Ecology and Society
Menzel, Susanne; Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research, Economics and Social Sciences; susanne.menzel@wsl.ch; Buchecker, Matthias; Swiss Federal Institute for Forest, Snow and Landscape Research, Economics and Social Sciences; matthias.buchecker@wsl.ch.
The need for social-ecological systems to become more adaptive is widely acknowledged. Social effects generated by participatory planning have been claimed to contribute to this transformation, but little empirical evidence is available that backs up or opposes this notion. We aimed to offer some insights regarding questions as to which social effects are formed in participatory planning processes and at what costs, and to then discuss their contribution to the transformation toward more adaptive social-ecological systems based on empirical evidence. Consequently, we investigated the social effects of participatory planning processes, including the social learning processes leading to them. We conducted semistructured interviews with members of advisory...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Comanagement; Participatory planning; Planning costs; Qualitative research; Social capital; Social learning; Time requirements.
Ano: 2013
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Education and Resilience: Social and Situated Learning among University and Secondary Students Ecology and Society
Krasny, Marianne E; Cornell University; mek2@cornell.edu; Tidball, Keith G.; Department of Natural Resources; Cornell University; kgt2@cornell.edu; Sriskandarajah, Nadarajah ; Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences; Nadarajah.Sriskandarajah@sol.slu.se.
Similar to research on social learning among adult participants in natural resources management, current research in the field of education claims that learning is situated in real-world practice, and occurs through recursive interactions between individual learners and their social and biophysical environment. In this article, we present an overview of the social and situated learning literatures from the fields of natural resources and education, and suggest ways in which educational programs for secondary and university students might be embedded in and contribute to efforts to enhance resilience of social–ecological systems at the local scale. We also describe three initiatives in which learning is situated in adaptive co-management and civic...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Synthesis Palavras-chave: Education; Learning; Natural resources management; Resilience; Situated learning; Social learning.
Ano: 2009
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Enabling Effective Problem-oriented Research for Sustainable Development Ecology and Society
Kueffer, Christoph; Institute of Integrative Biology, ETH Zurich; kueffer@env.ethz.ch; Underwood, Evelyn; Alliance for Global Sustainability, ETH Zurich;; Hirsch Hadorn, Gertrude; Institute for Environmental Decisions, ETH Zurich;; Holderegger, Rolf; Institute of Integrative Biology, ETH Zurich; WSL Swiss Federal Research Institute;; Pohl, Christian; Institute for Environmental Decisions, ETH Zurich;; Schirmer, Mario; Eawag;; Stauffacher, Michael; Institute for Environmental Decisions, ETH Zurich;; Wuelser, Gabriela; Institute for Environmental Decisions, ETH Zurich;; Edwards, Peter; Institute of Integrative Biology, ETH Zurich; Alliance for Global Sustainability, ETH Zurich;.
Environmental problems caused by human activities are increasing; biodiversity is disappearing at an unprecedented rate, soils are being irreversibly damaged, freshwater is increasingly in short supply, and the climate is changing. To reverse or even to reduce these trends will require a radical transformation in the relationship between humans and the natural environment. Just how this can be achieved within, at most, a few decades is unknown, but it is clear that academia must play a crucial role. Many believe, however, that academic institutions need to become more effective in helping societies move toward sustainability. We first synthesize current thinking about this crisis of research effectiveness. We argue that those involved in producing...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Synthesis Palavras-chave: Interdisciplinarity; Knowing-doing gap; Outreach; Participation; Post-normal science; Problem-oriented research; Research partnership; Research policy; Science-policy nexus; Social learning; Transdisciplinarity; Transition management.
Ano: 2012
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Exploring dynamic mechanisms of learning networks for resource conservation Ecology and Society
Matous, Petr; University of Tokyo; University of Sydney; petr@civil.t.u-tokyo.ac.jp; Todo, Yasuyuki; Waseda University; yastodo@waseda.jp.
The importance of networks for social-ecological processes has been recognized in the literature; however, existing studies have not sufficiently addressed the dynamic nature of networks. Using data on the social learning networks of 265 farmers in Ethiopia for 2011 and 2012 and stochastic actor-oriented modeling, we explain the mechanisms of network evolution and soil conservation. The farmers’ preferences for information exchange within the same social groups support the creation of interactive, clustered, nonhierarchical structures within the evolving learning networks, which contributed to the diffusion of the practice of composting. The introduced methods can be applied to determine whether and how social networks can be used to facilitate...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Composting; Ethiopia; Network dynamics; Social learning; Soil conservation; Stochastic actor-oriented modeling.
Ano: 2015
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Facilitating collective action and enhancing local knowledge: a herbal medicine case study in Talaandig communities, Philippines AgEcon
Hartanto, Herlina; Valmores, Cecil.
The indigenous people of Talaanding in Basac village, Bukidnon, the Philippines, had to deal with a high occurrence of disease and a high number of malnourished children in their village. This situation was due to the inability of the local health clinic to provide adequate health service and medicine to the community. Using an approach that promotes social learning and collective action, a CIFOR Adaptive Collaborative Management (ACM) research team facilitated a group of women, mostly the village health workers, in addressing their local health problems by using their local knowledge of medicinal plants and herbal medicines. This paper describes the ACM concept and the social learning processes that the women went through in identifying their...
Tipo: Working or Discussion Paper Palavras-chave: Social learning; Local knowledge; Medicinal plants; Adaptive collaborative management; Philippines; Health Economics and Policy.
Ano: 2006 URL: http://purl.umn.edu/50072
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From Scorecard to Social Learning: A Reflective Coassessment Approach for Promoting Multiagency Cooperation in Natural Resource Management Ecology and Society
Roux, Dirk J; Monash South Africa; International Water Centre; dirk.roux@adm.monash.edu; Murray, Kevin; Insight Modelling Services;; Nel, Jeanne L; Council for Scientific and Industrial Research;; Hill, Liesl; Council for Scientific and Industrial Research;; Roux, Hermien; North West Department of Agriculture, Conservation, Environment and Rural Development;; Driver, Amanda; South African National Biodiversity Institute;.
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Adaptive management; Bridging agents; Cross-sector cooperation; Freshwater conservation; Integrated water resources management; Management effectiveness evaluation; Reflective coassessment; Social learning.
Ano: 2011
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How does the context and design of participatory decision making processes affect their outcomes? Evidence from sustainable land management in global drylands Ecology and Society
de Vente, Joris; Spanish National Research Council (CEBAS-CSIC); joris@cebas.csic.es; Reed, Mark S.; Institute for Agri-Food Research and Innovation and Centre for Rural Economy, School of Agriculture, Food and Rural Development, Newcastle University; mark.reed@newcastle.ac.uk; Stringer, Lindsay C.; Sustainability Research Institute, School of Earth and Environment, University of Leeds; l.stringer@leeds.ac.uk; Valente, Sandra; Centre for Environmental and Marine Studies (CESAM), Department of Environment and Planning, University of Aveiro; sandra.valente@ua.pt.
Although the design of participatory processes to manage social-ecological systems needs to be adapted to local contexts, it is unclear which elements of process design might be universal. We use empirical evidence to analyze the extent to which context and process design can enable or impede stakeholder participation and facilitate beneficial environmental and social outcomes. To explore the role of design and minor variations in local context on the outcomes of participatory processes, we interviewed participants and facilitators from 11 case studies in which different process designs were used to select sustainable land management options in Spain and Portugal. We analyzed interview data using quantitative and qualitative approaches. Results showed that...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Drylands; Environmental management; Land degradation; Social learning; Stakeholder engagement; Sustainable land management.
Ano: 2016
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How social learning influences further collaboration: experiences from an international collaborative water project Ecology and Society
Bressers, Hans; Twente Centre for Studies in Technology and Sustainable Development (CSTM), University of Twente; j.t.a.bressers@utwente.nl; Augustijn, Denie C. M.; Department of Water Engineering and Management, University of Twente; d.c.m.augustijn@utwente.nl.
Social learning in collaborative settings can play an important role in reducing water management problems. In this paper we analyze the nature and effects of these learning processes in an international collaborative setting. We assert that social interactions contribute to substantive and relational learning, which involves changes in the motivations, cognitions and resources of individual actors. In addition, interactions may contribute to social learning, which is the case when actors develop collective outcomes on which further collaboration can be based. We use these theoretical insights to examine a water project in which Dutch and Romanian actors collaborate. Their interactions changed their individual motivations, cognitions, and resources and led...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: International collaboration; Romania; Social learning; Water resource management.
Ano: 2014
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Implementing Participatory Water Management: Recent Advances in Theory, Practice, and Evaluation Ecology and Society
von Korff, Yorck; Lisode; Cemagref / Irstea UMR G-EAU; yorck.von-korff@lisode.com; Daniell, Katherine A; The Australian National University; Cemagref / Irstea UMR G-EAU; k.a.daniell@gmail.com; Moellenkamp, Sabine; University of Osnabrueck; sabine.moellenkamp@gmx.de; Bots, Pieter; Delft University of Technology; p.w.g.bots@tudelft.nl; Bijlsma, Rianne M; University of Twente; Deltares; r.m.bredenhoff@gmail.com.
Many current water planning and management problems are riddled with high levels of complexity, uncertainty, and conflict, so-called “messes” or “wicked problems.” The realization that there is a need to consider a wide variety of values, knowledge, and perspectives in a collaborative decision making process has led to a multitude of new methods and processes being proposed to aid water planning and management, which include participatory forms of modeling, planning, and decision aiding processes. However, despite extensive scientific discussions, scholars have largely been unable to provide satisfactory responses to two pivotal questions: (1) What are the benefits of using participatory approaches?; (2) How exactly...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed article Palavras-chave: Adaptive management; Collaborative decision making; Evaluation; Interactive planning; Participatory modeling; Participatory research; Process design; Public participation; Social learning; Stakeholder participation; Water resources management.
Ano: 2012
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Informal Participatory Platforms for Adaptive Management. Insights into Niche-finding, Collaborative Design and Outcomes from a Participatory Process in the Rhine Basin Ecology and Society
Moellenkamp, Sabine; University of Osnabrueck, Institute of Environmental Systems Research; sabine.moellenkamp@usf.uni-osnabrueck.de; Lamers, Machiel; International Centre for Integrated assessment and Sustainable development (ICIS) - Maastricht University; machiel.lamers@icis.unimaas.nl; Huesmann, Christian; University of Osnabrueck, Institute of Environmental Systems Research; christian.huesmann@gmx.de; Rotter, Sophie; Seecon Deutschland GmbH; sophie.rotter@seecon.org; Pahl-Wostl, Claudia; University of Osnabrueck, Institute of Environmental Systems Research; pahl@usf.uni-osnabrueck.de; Speil, Karina; Seecon Deutschland GmbH; karina.speil@gmx.de; Pohl, Wiebke; University of Osnabrueck, Institute of Environmental Systems Research; wiebkepohl@googlemail.com.
New regulatory water management requirements on an international level increasingly challenge the capacity of regional water managers to adapt. Stakeholder participation can contribute to dealing with these challenges because it facilitates the incorporation of various forms of knowledge and interests into policy-making and decision-making processes. Also, by providing space for informal multi-stakeholder platforms, management experiments can be established more easily in rigid regulatory settings, allowing for social learning to take place. Stakeholder participation is currently stipulated by several legal provisions, such as the Water Framework Directive, which plays an increasingly important role in European water management. Drawing on recent...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Synthesis Palavras-chave: Adaptive water management; Co-design; Informal participatory platforms; Social learning; Stakeholder participation.
Ano: 2010
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Intermediate Collaborative Adaptive Management Strategies Build Stakeholder Capacity Ecology and Society
Monroe, Martha C.; School of Forest Resources and Conservation, University of Florida; mcmonroe@ufl.edu; Plate, Richard; School of Forest Resources and Conservation, University of Florida; richarp33@gmail.com; Oxarart, Annie; School of Forest Resources and Conservation, University of Florida; oxarart@ufl.edu.
Efforts to implement collaborative adaptive management (CAM) often suffer from challenges, such as an unwillingness of managers to share power, unresolved conflicts between stakeholders, and lack of capacity among stakeholders. Some aspects considered essential to CAM, e.g., trust and stakeholder capacity, may be more usefully viewed as goals for intermediate strategies rather than a set of initial conditions. From this perspective, intermediate steps that focus on social learning and building experience could overcome commonly cited barriers to CAM. An exploration of Springs Basin Working Groups, organized around major clusters of freshwater springs in north Florida, provides a case study of how these intermediate steps enable participants to become more...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Collaborative adaptive management; Florida USA; Public participation; Reasonable Person Model; Social learning; Stakeholder capacity.
Ano: 2013
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Learning About a New Technology: Pineapple In Ghana AgEcon
Conley, Timothy G.; Udry, Christopher R..
This paper investigates the role of social learning in the diffusion of a new agricultural technology in a developing country: Ghana. We use unique data on farmers’ communication patterns to define each individual’s information neighborhood, the set of others from whom he might learn. Our empirical strategy is to test whether farmers change their input decisions to align with those of their neighbors who were successful in previous periods. We present evidence that farmers adopt successful neighbors’ practices, conditional on many potentially confounding factors including the physical proximity of plots, credit arrangements, clan membership, and soil characteristics.
Tipo: Working or Discussion Paper Palavras-chave: Social learning; Technology; Innovation; Crop Production/Industries; Research and Development/Tech Change/Emerging Technologies; 031; 012; 013.
Ano: 2000 URL: http://purl.umn.edu/28400
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Learning as You Journey: Anishinaabe Perception of Social-ecological Environments and Adaptive Learning Ecology and Society
Davidson-Hunt, Iain; University of Manitoba; Iain_Davidson-Hunt@umanitoba.ca; Berkes, Fikret; University of Manitoba; berkes@cc.umanitoba.ca.
This paper explores the linkages between social-ecological resilience and adaptive learning. We refer to adaptive learning as a method to capture the two-way relationship between people and their social-ecological environment. In this paper, we focus on traditional ecological knowledge. Research was undertaken with the Anishinaabe people of Iskatewizaagegan No. 39 Independent First Nation, in northwestern Ontario, Canada. The research was carried out over two field seasons, with verification workshops following each field season. The methodology was based on site visits and transects determined by the elders as appropriate to answer a specific question, find specific plants, or locate plant communities. During site visits and transect walks, research...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Anishinaabe; Canadian North; Adaptive learning; Boreal; Ecological perception; Ethnoecology; Resilience; Social learning; Social-ecological systems; Sustainability science; Traditional ecological knowledge.
Ano: 2003
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Learning in Adaptive Management: Insights from Published Practice Ecology and Society
Fabricius, Christo; Sustainability Research Unit, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, South Africa; christo.fabricius@nmmu.ac.za; Cundill, Georgina; Department of Environmental Science, Rhodes University, Grahamstown, South Africa; georgina.cundill@gmail.com.
Adaptive management is often advocated as a solution to understanding and managing complexity in social-ecological systems. Given the centrality of learning in adaptive management, it remains unclear how learning in adaptive management is understood to occur, who learns, what they learn about, and how they learn. We conducted a systematic review using the Thomson Reuters Web of Science, and searched specifically for examples of the practical implementation of adaptive management between 2011 and 2013, i.e., excluding articles that suggested frameworks, models, or recommendations for future action. This provided a subset of 22 papers that were analyzed using five elements: the aims of adaptive management as stated in each paper; the reported achievements...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Adaptive management; Biological conservation; Ecosystem management; Governance; Social learning.
Ano: 2014
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Managing Change toward Adaptive Water Management through Social Learning Ecology and Society
Pahl-Wostl, Claudia; University of Osnabrueck; pahl@usf.uni-osnabrueck.de; Sendzimir, Jan; International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis; sendzim@iiasa.ac.at; Jeffrey, Paul; Cranfield University; p.j.jeffrey@cranfield.ac.uk; Aerts, Jeroen; Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam; jeroen.aerts@ivm.vu.nl; Berkamp, Ger; IUCN - The World Conservation Union; GJB@hq.iucn.org; Cross, Katharine; IUCN - The World Conservation Union; Katharine.Cross@iucn.org.
The management of water resources is currently undergoing a paradigm shift toward a more integrated and participatory management style. This paper highlights the need to fully take into account the complexity of the systems to be managed and to give more attention to uncertainties. Achieving this requires adaptive management approaches that can more generally be defined as systematic strategies for improving management policies and practices by learning from the outcomes of previous management actions. This paper describes how the principles of adaptive water management might improve the conceptual and methodological base for sustainable and integrated water management in an uncertain and complex world. Critical debate is structured around four questions:...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Adaptive management; Integrated water resources management; Social learning; Adaptive governance; Change management; Uncertainty.
Ano: 2007
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