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Registros recuperados: 17
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Can Law Foster Social-Ecological Resilience? Ecology and Society
Garmestani, Ahjond S.; Environmental Protection Agency, USA; garmestani.ahjond@epa.gov; Allen, Craig R.; U.S. Geological Survey - Nebraska Cooperative Fish & Wildlife Research Unit, School of Natural Resources, University of Nebraska, Lincoln, NE, USA. ; allencr@unl.edu; Benson, Melinda H.; Department of Geography and Environmental Studies, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM, USA.; mhbenson@unm.edu.
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Adaptive governance; Adaptive management; Law; Social-ecological resilience.
Ano: 2013
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Community-Based Conservation and Traditional Ecological Knowledge: Implications for Social-Ecological Resilience Ecology and Society
Our review highlights how traditional ecological knowledge influences people's adaptive capacity to social-ecological change and identifies a set of mechanisms that contribute to such capacity in the context of community-based biodiversity conservation initiatives. Twenty-three publications, including twenty-nine case studies, were reviewed with the aim of investigating how local knowledge, community-based conservation, and resilience interrelate in social-ecological systems. We highlight that such relationships have not been systematically addressed in regions where a great number of community conservation initiatives are found; and we identify a set of factors that foster people's adaptive capacity to social-ecological change and a number of social...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Adaptive capacity; Biodiversity conservation; Community-based conservation; Ecosystem services; Local ecological knowledge; Natural resource management; Social-ecological change; Social-ecological resilience; Traditional ecological knowledge.
Ano: 2013
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Culturally significant fisheries: keystones for management of freshwater social-ecological systems Ecology and Society
Noble, Mae; Fenner School of Environment and Society, The Australian National University; mae.noble@anu.edu.au; Duncan, Phil; Gamilaroi Traditional Owner, NSW Aboriginal Land Council; phil.duncan@alc.org.au; Perry, Darren; Murray Lower Darling Rivers Indigenous Nations; ngintait@gmail.com; Prosper, Kerry; Paq'tnekek Mi'kmaq First Nations; kerryp@paqtnkek.ca; Rose, Denis; Gunditj Mirring Traditional Owners Aboriginal Corporation; Denis@gunditjmirring.com; Schnierer, Stephan; School of Environment, Science and Engineering, Southern Cross University; stephan.schnierer@scu.edu.au; Tipa, Gail; Tipa and Associates Ltd.; gttipa@vodafone.co.nz; Williams, Erica; National Institute of Water and Atmospheric Research; Erica.Williams@niwa.co.nz; Woods, Rene; National Cultural Flows Program; Murray Lower Darling River Indigenous Nations; woodsre83@gmail.com; Pittock, Jamie; Fenner School of Environment and Society, The Australian National University; jamie.pittock@anu.edu.au.
Indigenous peoples of North America, Australia, and New Zealand have a long tradition of harvesting freshwater animals. Over generations of reliance and subsistence harvesting, Indigenous peoples have acquired a profound understanding of these freshwater animals and ecosystems that have become embedded within their cultural identity. We have identified trans-Pacific parallels in the cultural significance of several freshwater animal groups, such as eels, other finfish, bivalves, and crayfish, to Indigenous peoples and their understanding and respect for the freshwater ecosystems on which their community survival depends. In recognizing such cultural connections, we found that non-Indigenous peoples can appreciate the deep significance of freshwater animals...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Synthesis Palavras-chave: Adaptive freshwater management; Aquatic resources; Bivalve; Comanagement; Crayfish; Cultural keystone species; Eel; Indigenous ecological knowledge; Indigenous water rights; Lamprey; Salmon; Social-ecological resilience.
Ano: 2016
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Dietary Changes over Time in a Caiçara Community from the Brazilian Atlantic Forest Ecology and Society
MacCord, Priscila L.; Universidade Estadual de Campinas; pmaccord@gmail.com; Begossi, Alpina; Universidade Estadual de Campinas; alpinab@uol.com.br.
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Atlantic Forest; Brazil; Caiç Ara; Social-ecological resilience; Dietary change; Fish consumption; Animal protein; Food delocalization; Niche breadth.
Ano: 2006
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Does Adaptive Management of Natural Resources Enhance Resilience to Climate Change? Ecology and Society
Tompkins, Emma L; Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research, University of East Anglia; e.tompkins@uea.ac.uk; Adger, W. Neil; Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research, University of East Anglia; n.adger@uea.ac.uk.
Emerging insights from adaptive and community-based resource management suggest that building resilience into both human and ecological systems is an effective way to cope with environmental change characterized by future surprises or unknowable risks. We argue that these emerging insights have implications for policies and strategies for responding to climate change. We review perspectives on collective action for natural resource management to inform understanding of climate response capacity. We demonstrate the importance of social learning, specifically in relation to the acceptance of strategies that build social and ecological resilience. Societies and communities dependent on natural resources need to enhance their capacity to adapt to the impacts...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Caribbean; Trinidad and Tobago; Adaptive capacity; Climate change; Community-based management; Natural resource management; Social-ecological resilience.
Ano: 2004
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Educating for resilience in the North: building a toolbox for teachers Ecology and Society
Spellman, Katie V.; Resilience and Adaptation Program, University of Alaska Fairbanks; katie.spellman@alaska.edu.
Communities at far northern latitudes must respond rapidly to the many complex problems that are arising from changing climate. An emerging body of theoretical and empirical work has explored the role that education plays in enhancing the resilience and adaptability of social-ecological systems. To foster effective, local, and timely responses of high-latitude communities to climate-driven social-ecological change, educators need access to successful and efficient teaching tools to foster resilience-promoting feedbacks. The potential for existing teaching practices to address this need, however, must be investigated and communicated to teachers. Here, I review the education and sustainability science literature for attributes of resilience to which formal...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Synthesis Palavras-chave: Alaska; Citizen science; Human capital; Metacognition; Pedagogy; Scenarios thinking; Sense of place; Social capital; Social-ecological resilience; Systems thinking.
Ano: 2015
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Enhancing Adaptive Capacity in Food Systems: Learning at Farmers' Markets in Sweden Ecology and Society
Milestad, Rebecka; Department of Urban and Rural Studies, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences; Division of Environmental Strategies Research, Royal Institute of Technology; rebecka.milestad@sol.slu.se; Westberg, Lotten; Department of Urban and Rural Studies, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences;; Geber, Ulrika; County Administrative Board of Stockholm;.
This article examines how local food systems in the form of farmers' markets can enhance adaptive capacity and build social-ecological resilience. It does this by exploring the learning potential among farmers and customers. Learning can enable actors to adapt successfully and thus build adaptive capacity. Three forms of learning are investigated: instrumental, communicative, and emancipatory. These forms of learning constitute the foundation for lasting changes of behaviors. Local food systems are characterized by close links and opportunities for face-to-face interactions between consumers and producers of food, and are also institutions where farmers and customers can express and act upon their ethical values concerning food. However, local food systems...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Adaptive capacity; Learning; Local food systems; Farmers' markets; Short food chains; Social-ecological resilience.
Ano: 2010
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Governance of Aquatic Agricultural Systems: Analyzing Representation, Power, and Accountability Ecology and Society
Ratner, Blake D.; WorldFish; b.ratner@cgiar.org; Cohen, Philippa; ARC Centre of Excellence for Coral Reef Studies, James Cook University; WorldFish; p.cohen@cgiar.org; Barman, Benoy; WorldFish; b.barman@cgiar.org; Mam, Kosal; WorldFish; k.mam@cgiar.org; Nagoli, Joseph; WorldFish; j.nagoli@cgiar.org; Allison, Edward H.; School of International Development, University of East Anglia; WorldFish; e.allison@cgiar.org.
Aquatic agricultural systems in developing countries face increasing competition from multiple stakeholders over rights to access and use natural resources, land, water, wetlands, and fisheries, essential to rural livelihoods. A key implication is the need to strengthen governance to enable equitable decision making amidst competition that spans sectors and scales, building capacities for resilience, and for transformations in institutions that perpetuate poverty. In this paper we provide a simple framework to analyze the governance context for aquatic agricultural system development focused on three dimensions: stakeholder representation, distribution of power, and mechanisms of accountability. Case studies from Cambodia, Bangladesh, Malawi/Mozambique,...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Accountability; Bangladesh; Cambodia; Civil society; Coastal zone management; Environmental governance; Livelihoods; Malawi; Mozambique; Power; Social-ecological resilience; Solomon Islands; Stakeholder representation; Wetlands.
Ano: 2013
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Linking classroom learning and research to advance ideas about social-ecological resilience Ecology and Society
Ban, Natalie C.; School of Environmental Studies, University of Victoria; nban@uvic.ca; Boyd, Emily; School of Archaeology, Geography and Environmental Sciences, University of Reading; Stockholm Resilience Centre, Stockholm University.; emily.boyd@reading.ac.uk; Cox, Michael; Environmental Studies Program, Dartmouth College; michael.e.cox@dartmouth.edu; Meek, Chanda L.; Department of Political Science, University of Alaska Fairbanks; clmeek@alaska.edu; Schoon, Michael; School of Sustainability, Arizona State University; michael.schoon@asu.edu; Villamayor-Tomas, Sergio; Division of Resource Economics, Humboldt University; villamayortomas@gmail.com.
There is an increasing demand in higher education institutions for training in complex environmental problems. Such training requires a careful mix of conventional methods and innovative solutions, a task not always easy to accomplish. In this paper we review literature on this theme, highlight relevant advances in the pedagogical literature, and report on some examples resulting from our recent efforts to teach complex environmental issues. The examples range from full credit courses in sustainable development and research methods to project-based and in-class activity units. A consensus from the literature is that lectures are not sufficient to fully engage students in these issues. A conclusion from the review of examples is that problem-based and...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Insight Palavras-chave: Complex systems; Interdisciplinarity; Pedagogy; Problem-based learning; Project-based learning; Social-ecological resilience; Social-ecological systems; Teaching.
Ano: 2015
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Local perceptions on social-ecological dynamics in Latin America in three community-based natural resource management systems Ecology and Society
Several examples of community-based natural resource management in Latin American social-ecological systems exist in which communities control the management of common-pool resources. Understanding community perceptions of the performance of these systems is essential to involve communities in sustainable management strategies. In this analysis of three areas in Colombia, Mexico, and Argentina, we analyzed the local perceptions of the social and environmental challenges faced by these social-ecological systems and how these challenges and drivers affect their resilience. To do this, we combined prospective structural analysis to unravel stakeholders’ perceptions of each system’s functioning along with network analysis to assess...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Argentina; Colombia; Common-pool resources; Environmental challenges; Governance; Mexico; Network analysis; Ostrom; Prospective structural analysis; Social-ecological resilience.
Ano: 2015
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Probing the interfaces between the social sciences and social-ecological resilience: insights from integrative and hybrid perspectives in the social sciences Ecology and Society
Stone-Jovicich, Samantha; CSIRO Land and Water Flagship, Adaptive Social and Economic Sciences Program; samantha.stone-jovicich@csiro.au.
Social scientists, and scholars in related interdisciplinary fields, have critiqued resilience thinking’s oversimplification of social dimensions of coupled social-ecological systems. Resilience scholars have countered with “where is the ecology” in social analyses? My aim is to contribute to current efforts to strengthen inter- and transdisciplinary debate and inquiry between the social-ecological resilience community and the social sciences. I synthesize three social science perspectives, which stress the complex, dynamic, and multiscalar interconnections between the biophysical and social realms in explaining social-environmental change, and which place both the social and ecology centre stage in their analyses:...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Synthesis Palavras-chave: Actor-network theory; Agency; ANT; Human-environment relations; Hybrid perspectives; Interdisciplinary; Normative issues; Political ecology; Power; Social-ecological resilience; Social-ecological systems; Social sciences; Social systems; Transdisciplinary; World systems analysis.
Ano: 2015
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Small islands, valuable insights: systems of customary resource use and resilience to climate change in the Pacific Ecology and Society
McMillen, Heather L; University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa; hmcmille@hawaii.edu; Ticktin, Tamara; University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa; ticktin@hawaii.edu; Friedlander, Alan; National Geographic Society-Pristine Seas Project; University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa; alan.Friedlander@hawaii.edu; Jupiter, Stacy D; Wildlife Conservation Society Fiji Country Program; sjupiter@wcs.org; Thaman, Randolph; University of the South Pacific; randolph.thaman@usp.ac.fj; Campbell, John; University of Waikato; j.campbell@waikato.ac.nz; Veitayaki, Joeli; University of the South Pacific; joeli.veitayaki@usp.ac.fj; Giambelluca, Thomas; University of Hawaiʻi at Mānoa; Nagoya University; thomas@hawaii.edu; Nihmei, Salesa; SPREP; salesan@sprep.org; Rupeni, Etika; IUCN/Locally Managed Marine Network; etika.rupeni@iucn.org; Apis-Overhoff, Lucille; University of the South Pacific; lu.overhoff@gmail.com; Aalbersberg, William; University of the South Pacific; william.aalbersberg@usp.ac.fj; Orcherton, Dan F.; Centre for Sustainable Technology and Development, Fiji National University; dan.orcherton@fnu.ac.fj.
Understanding how social-ecological systems are and can be resilient to climate change is one of the world's most crucial problems today. It requires knowledge at local and global scales, the integration of natural and social sciences, and a focus on biocultural diversity. Small Pacific Islands and the knowledge-practice-belief systems of their peoples have a long history of resilience to environmental variability and unpredictability, including in areas with marginal habitats and with periodic, severe disturbance (e.g., drought, flood, storms, and tsunami). We review the state of research on these knowledge systems as it pertains to resilience and adaptation, and we highlight critical research needs to address the interrelated areas of: (1) local-scale...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Synthesis Palavras-chave: Biocultural diversity; Climate; Customary; Indigenous and local ecological knowledge; Pacific Islands; Social-ecological resilience.
Ano: 2014
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Social Capital and Social-Ecological Resilience in the Asteroussia Mountains, Southern Crete, Greece Ecology and Society
Kizos, Thanasis; Department of Geography, University of the Aegean; akizos@aegean.gr; Detsis, Vassilis; Department of Home Economics & Ecology, Harokopio University;; Iosifides, Theodoros; Department of Geography, University of the Aegean;; Metaxakis, Minas; Department of Geography, University of the Aegean;.
Social-ecological resilience (SER) expresses the capacity of a social-ecological system to adapt and transform. We investigated the ways in which different types and transformations of social capital influence the SER of a region. The study area, the Asteroussia Mountains in southern Crete, Greece, is a typical semiarid hilly/mountainous area of the eastern Mediterranean in which land degradation is one of the most important issues in land management, mostly related to overgrazing because of the growing size of the flocks of sheep and goats. The approach followed was qualitative, with in-depth interviews with a small number of key stakeholders in the area. The findings indicate many important changes in the area in terms of its production, economy, and...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Crete; Greece; Land degradation and desertification; Social-ecological resilience; Social-ecological system.
Ano: 2014
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Social Thresholds and their Translation into Social-ecological Management Practices Ecology and Society
Christensen, Lisa; Yukon College; lc.yukon@gmail.com; Krogman, Naomi; University of Alberta; naomi.krogman@ualberta.ca.
The objective of this paper is to provide a preliminary discussion of how to improve our conceptualization of social thresholds using (1) a more sociological analysis of social resilience, and (2) results from research carried out in collaboration with the Champagne and Aishihik First Nations of the Yukon Territory, Canada. Our sociological analysis of the concept of resilience begins with a review of the literature followed by placement of the concept in the domain of sociological theory to gain insight into its strengths and limitations. A new notion of social thresholds is proposed and case study research discussed to support the proposition. Our findings suggest that rather than view social thresholds as breakpoints between two regimes, as thresholds...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Functionalism; Social-ecological resilience; Thresholds; Yukon Territory.
Ano: 2012
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The Political Economy of Cross-Scale Networks in Resource Co-Management Ecology and Society
Adger, W. Neil; Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research; n.adger@uea.ac.uk; Brown, Katrina; University of East Anglia; k.brown@uea.ac.uk; Tompkins, Emma L.; University of East Anglia; e.tompkins@uea.ac.uk.
We investigate linkages between stakeholders in resource management that occur at different spatial and institutional levels and identify the winners and losers in such interactions. So-called cross-scale interactions emerge because of the benefits to individual stakeholder groups in undertaking them or the high costs of not undertaking them. Hence there are uneven gains from cross-scale interactions that are themselves an integral part of social-ecological system governance. The political economy framework outlined here suggests that the determinants of the emergence of cross-scale interactions are the exercise of relative power between stakeholders and their costs of accessing and creating linkages. Cross-scale interactions by powerful stakeholders have...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Insight Palavras-chave: Caribbean; Institutions; Marine protected areas; Natural resource management; Power; Social-ecological resilience; Transaction costs..
Ano: 2005
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The Politics of Social-ecological Resilience and Sustainable Socio-technical Transitions Ecology and Society
Smith, Adrian; SPRU - Science & Technology Policy Research, University of Sussex; a.g.smith@sussex.ac.uk; Stirling, Andy; SPRU - Science & Technology Policy Research, University of Sussex; a.c.stirling@sussex.ac.uk.
Technology-focused literature on socio-technical transitions shares some of the complex systems sensibilities of social-ecological systems research. We contend that the sharing of lessons between these areas of study must attend particularly to the common governance challenges that confront both approaches. Here, we focus on critical experience arising from reactions to a transition management approach to governing sustainable socio-technical transformations. Questions over who governs, whose system framings count, and whose sustainability gets prioritized are all pertinent to social-ecological systems research. We conclude that future research in both areas should deal more centrally and explicitly with these inherently political dimensions of...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Synthesis Palavras-chave: Governance; Social-ecological resilience; Socio-technical transitions.
Ano: 2010
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The role of social learning for social-ecological systems in Korean village groves restoration Ecology and Society
Lee, Eunju; Civic Ecology Lab, Department of Natural Resources, Cornell University; el372@cornell.edu; Krasny, Marianne E.; Civic Ecology Lab, Department of Natural Resources, Cornell University; mek2@cornell.edu.
Recently, social learning has been recognized as a means to foster adaptation to changing conditions, and more broadly, social-ecological systems resilience. However, the discussion of social learning and social-ecological resilience in different cultural contexts is limited. In this study we introduce the Korean Village Groves Restoration Project (VGRP) through the lens of social learning, and discuss implications of the VGRP for resilience in villages impacted by industrialization and decline of traditional forest resources. We conducted open-ended interviews with VGRP leaders, government and NGO officials, and residents in four villages in South Korea, and found that villages responded to ecosystem change in ways that could be explained by the...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: Korean village groves; Multiple loop learning; Natural resource management; Social-ecological resilience; Social learning.
Ano: 2015
Registros recuperados: 17
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