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Framing sustainability in a telecoupled world. Repositório Alice
LIU, J.; HULL, V.; BATISTELLA, M.; DEFRIES, R.; DIETZ, T.; FU, F.; HERTEL, T. W.; IZAURRALDE, R. C.; LAMBIN, E. F.; LI, S.; MARTINELLI, L. A.; MCCONNELL, W. J.; MORAN, E. F.; NAYLOR, R.; OUYANG, Z.; POLENSKE, K. R.; REENBERG, A.; ROCHA, G. DE M.; SIMMONS, C. S.; VERBURG, P. H.; VITOUSEK, P. M.; ZHANG, F.; ZHU, C..
Interactions between distant places are increasingly widespread and influential, often leading to unexpected outcomes with profound implications for sustainability. Numerous sustainability studies have been conducted within a particular place with little attention to the impacts of distant interactions on sustainability in multiple places. although distant forces have been studied, they are usually treated as exogenous variables and feedbacks have rarely been considered. To understand and integrate various distant interactions better, we propose an integrated framework based on telecoupling, an umbrella concept that refers to socioeconomic and environmental interactions over distances. The concept of telecoupling is a logical extension of research on...
Tipo: Artigo em periódico indexado (ALICE) Palavras-chave: Agents; Causes; Coupled human-environment systems; Coupled human and natural systems; Coupled socialecological systems; Dispersal; Distant interactions; Effects; Feedbacks; Flows; Globalization; Investment; Knowledge transfer; Migration; Socioeconomic and environmental interactions; Species invasion; Sustainability; Technology transfer; Teleconnection; Telecoupling; Trade; Transnational land deals; Water transfer.
Ano: 2013 URL: http://www.alice.cnptia.embrapa.br/handle/doc/961534
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Framing Sustainability in a Telecoupled World Ecology and Society
Liu, Jianguo; Michigan State University, USA; liuji@msu.edu; Hull, Vanessa; Michigan State University, USA; hullvane@csis.msu.edu; Batistella, Mateus; EMBRAPA Satellite Monitoring, Campinas, SP, Brazil; mb@cnpm.embrapa.br; DeFries, Ruth; Columbia University, USA; rd2402@columbia.edu; Dietz, Thomas; Michigan State University, USA; tdietz@msu.edu; Fu, Feng; Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA; fufengenergy@gmail.com; Hertel, Thomas W.; Purdue University, USA; hertel@purdue.edu; Izaurralde, R. Cesar; University of Maryland, USA; cesar.izaurralde@pnnl.gov; Lambin, Eric F.; Stanford University, USA; elambin@stanford.edu; Li, Shuxin; Michigan State University, USA; lishu@msu.edu; McConnell, William J.; Michigan State University, USA; mcconn64@msu.edu; Moran, Emilio F.; Michigan State University, USA; moranef@msu.edu; Naylor, Rosamond; Stanford University, USA; Roz@stanford.edu; Ouyang, Zhiyun; Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China; zyouyang@rcees.ac.cn; Polenske, Karen R.; Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA; krp@mit.edu; Reenberg, Anette; University of Copenhagen, Copenhagen, Denmark; Ar@geogr.ku.dk; Simmons, Cynthia S.; Michigan State University, USA; simmo108@msu.edu; Verburg, Peter H.; Institute for Environmental Studies, VU University Amsterdam, Netherlands; Peter.Verburg@ivm.vu.nl; Vitousek, Peter M.; Stanford University, USA; vitousek@leland.stanford.edu; Zhang, Fusuo; China Agricultural University, Beijing, China; zhangfs@cau.edu.cn; Zhu, Chunquan; International Union for Conservation of Nature, China; caomu1963@126.com.
Interactions between distant places are increasingly widespread and influential, often leading to unexpected outcomes with profound implications for sustainability. Numerous sustainability studies have been conducted within a particular place with little attention to the impacts of distant interactions on sustainability in multiple places. Although distant forces have been studied, they are usually treated as exogenous variables and feedbacks have rarely been considered. To understand and integrate various distant interactions better, we propose an integrated framework based on telecoupling, an umbrella concept that refers to socioeconomic and environmental interactions over distances. The concept of telecoupling is a logical extension of research on...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Synthesis Palavras-chave: Agents; Causes; Coupled human-environment systems; Coupled human and natural systems; Coupled social-ecological systems; Dispersal; Distant interactions; Effects; Feedbacks; Flows; Globalization; Investment; Knowledge transfer; Migration; Socioeconomic and environmental interactions; Species invasion; Sustainability; Technology transfer; Teleconnection; Telecoupling; Trade; Transnational land deals; Water transfer.
Ano: 2013
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Multiple telecouplings and their complex interrelationships Ecology and Society
Liu, Jianguo; Center for Systems Integration and Sustainability, Michigan State University; liuji@msu.edu; Hull, Vanessa; Center for Systems Integration and Sustainability, Michigan State University; hullvane@msu.edu; Luo, Junyan; Center for Systems Integration and Sustainability, Michigan State University; Systems In Motion; JLuo@Entertainment.com; Yang, Wu; Center for Systems Integration and Sustainability, Michigan State University; Conservation International; yangwu1201@gmail.com; Liu, Wei; Center for Systems Integration and Sustainability, Michigan State University; International Institute for Applied Systems Analysis (IIASA); wliu@helppanda.org; Vogt, Christine; Department of Community Sustainability, Michigan State University; chrisv@asu.edu; Xu, Zhenci; Center for Systems Integration and Sustainability, Michigan State University; xuzhenci@msu.edu; Yang, Hongbo; Center for Systems Integration and Sustainability, Michigan State University; yanghongbo01@gmail.com; Zhang, Jindong; Center for Systems Integration and Sustainability, Michigan State University; zhangjd224@163.com; An, Li; Department of Geography, San Diego State University; lan@mail.sdsu.edu; Chen, Xiaodong; Department of Geography, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; chenxd@email.unc.edu; Li, Shuxin; Center for Systems Integration and Sustainability, Michigan State University; lishu@msu.edu; Ouyang, Zhiyun; State Key Laboratory of Urban and Regional Ecology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences; zyouyang@rcees.ac.cn; Xu, Weihua; State Key Laboratory of Urban and Regional Ecology, Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences; xuweihua@rcees.ac.cn; Zhang, Hemin; Wolong Nature Reserve; 2892959098@qq.com.
Increasingly, the world is becoming socioeconomically and environmentally connected, but many studies have focused on human-environment interactions within a particular area. Although some studies have considered the impacts of external factors, there is little research on multiple reciprocal socioeconomic and environmental interactions between a focal area and other areas. Here we address this important knowledge gap by applying the new integrated framework of telecouplings (socioeconomic and environmental interactions between two or more areas over distances). Results show that even a protected area - i.e., the Wolong Nature Reserve for giant pandas in southwest China - has multiple telecoupling processes with the rest of the world; these include panda...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: China; Conservation; Cross-scale interactions; Environmental interactions; Giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca); Human-environment interactions; Information dissemination; Nature reserve; Socioeconomic interactions; Telecoupling; Telecoupling framework; Wolong Nature Reserve.
Ano: 2015
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Synthesis of human-nature feedbacks Ecology and Society
Hull, Vanessa; Center for Systems Integration and Sustainability (CSIS), Michigan State University; hullvane@msu.edu; Tuanmu, Mao-Ning; Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, Yale University; Center for Systems Integration and Sustainability (CSIS), Michigan State University; mao-ning.tuanmu@yale.edu; Liu, Jianguo; Center for Systems Integration and Sustainability (CSIS), Michigan State University; liuji@msu.edu.
In today’s globalized world, humans and nature are inextricably linked. The coupled human and natural systems (CHANS) framework provides a lens with which to understand such complex interactions. One of the central components of the CHANS framework involves examining feedbacks among human and natural systems, which form when effects from one system on another system feed back to affect the first system. Despite developments in understanding feedbacks in single disciplines, interdisciplinary research on CHANS feedbacks to date is scant and often site-specific, a shortcoming that prevents complex coupled systems from being fully understood. The special feature “Exploring Feedbacks in Coupled Human and Natural Systems (CHANS)”...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Reports Palavras-chave: CHANS; Feedback; Policy; Sustainability; Telecoupling; Time lag.
Ano: 2015
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Urban water sustainability: framework and application Ecology and Society
Yang, Wu; Department of Environmental Science, Zhejiang University, China; wyang@zju.edu.cn; Hyndman, David W.; Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Michigan State University, USA; hyndman@msu.edu; Winkler, Julie A.; Department of Geography, Michigan State University, USA; winkler@msu.edu; Deines, Jillian M.; Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Michigan State University, USA; Center for Systems Integration and Sustainability, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Michigan State University, USA; jillian.deines@gmail.com; Lupi, Frank; Center for Systems Integration and Sustainability, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Michigan State University, USA; Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics, Michigan State University, USA; lupi@msu.edu; Luo, Lifeng; Department of Geography, Michigan State University, USA; lluo@msu.edu; Li, Yunkai; Department of Hydraulic Engineering, China Agriculture University, China; liyunkai@126.com; Basso, Bruno; Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Michigan State University, USA; basso@msu.edu; Zheng, Chunmiao; School of Environmental Science and Engineering, South University of Science and Technology of China, China; Center for Water Research, College of Engineering, Peking University, China; Department of Geological Sciences, University of Alabama, USA; czheng@pku.edu.cn; Ma, Dongchun; Beijing Water Science and Technology Institute, China; State Key Lab of Urban and Regional Ecology, Research Center for Eco-environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China; mdc@bwsti.com; Li, Shuxin; Center for Systems Integration and Sustainability, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Michigan State University, USA; lishu@msu.edu; Liu, Xiao; Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, Michigan State University, USA; liuxia32@msu.edu; Zheng, Hua; State Key Lab of Urban and Regional Ecology, Research Center for Eco-environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China; zhenghua@rcees.ac.cn; Cao, Guoliang; Center for Water Research, College of Engineering, Peking University, China; gliang.cao@gmail.com; Meng, Qingyi; Beijing Water Science and Technology Institute, China; mqy@bwsti.com; Ouyang, Zhiyun; State Key Lab of Urban and Regional Ecology, Research Center for Eco-environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, China; zyouyang@rcees.ac.cn; Liu, Jianguo; Center for Systems Integration and Sustainability, Department of Fisheries and Wildlife, Michigan State University, USA; liuji@msu.edu.
Urban areas such as megacities (those with populations greater than 10 million) are hotspots of global water use and thus face intense water management challenges. Urban areas are influenced by local interactions between human and natural systems and interact with distant systems through flows of water, food, energy, people, information, and capital. However, analyses of water sustainability and the management of water flows in urban areas are often fragmented. There is a strong need to apply integrated frameworks to systematically analyze urban water dynamics and factors that influence these dynamics. We apply the framework of telecoupling (socioeconomic and environmental interactions over distances) to analyze urban water issues, using Beijing as a...
Tipo: Peer-Reviewed Synthesis Palavras-chave: Environmental governance; Megacity; Spillover effects; Sustainability; Systems approach; Telecoupling; Virtual water; Water management.
Ano: 2016
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